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(1) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Teacher's Guide Only - No Video) Teacher’s Guide Only - No Video (PDF avaliable lower left)
(Photos)

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen. The production looks at three broad topics: The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains; The Buildings; The Present and Future

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SGLPTG
(A) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Entire Program) Teacher’s Guide – Lower Left (PDF)
(Photos)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen. The production looks at three broad topics: The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains; The Buildings; The Present and Future

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SGLPTG
(B) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Chapter 1 - The Beginning) Teacher’s Guide – Lower Left (PDF)

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA The Beginning - The video visits buildings with some of the earliest stained glass windows in the state, including churches and courthouses. (Photos)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen.

Many communities across the state have used these stained glass windows to tell their stories – their connection to God, the homestead experience or life on the Great Plains. Windows can be found in private homes, churches, courthouse, schools, and even in barns.

The production looks at three broad topics.

The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains
Stained glass windows originally were developed in the Middle East. Early stained glass artists learned to use metals like gold, cobalt, copper and others to create vibrant colors in glass. Centuries later, settlers who immigrated to the Great Plains brought their stained glass traditions with them. In South Dakota, these colorful windows often tell the same stories as windows found in Europe and the Middle East about religion, art and memories.

The Buildings
Churches are most commonly associated with stained glass. Some windows depict biblical figures or stories and some are merely decorative. But not all stained glass is connected to religious communities. Throughout South Dakota there are buildings where stained glass tells stories of our state, individual communities, prominent families, epic events, or sometimes mystical people and places. The State Capitol building is home to many beautiful windows, but the art form is found across the state in schools, courthouses and homes.

The Present and Future
Many of the stained glass windows found across the state are showing the ravages of time. The restoration of a stained glass window is expensive and time consuming, but those who love and respect these beautiful pieces of history are finding ways to restore them. Creating stained glass remains a living art form, and many of today’s artists continue to carry on the storytelling tradition in their contemporary creations. Technology is allowing today’s craftsmen to create more contemporary designs with vivid color choices.

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SGLPTG
(C) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Chapter 2 - What Is Stained Glass) Teacher’s Guide – Lower Left (PDF)

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA What Is Stained Glass - Dr. Barbara Johnson, a South Dakota Humanities Scholar, describes some of the history of how stained glass came to be, both naturally and as an art form. She explains the basic process for creating stained glass. Stained glass was important in churches in the Middle Ages to help relate church teachings to a largely illiterate audience through visual communication. (Photos)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen.

Many communities across the state have used these stained glass windows to tell their stories – their connection to God, the homestead experience or life on the Great Plains. Windows can be found in private homes, churches, courthouse, schools, and even in barns.

The production looks at three broad topics.

The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains
Stained glass windows originally were developed in the Middle East. Early stained glass artists learned to use metals like gold, cobalt, copper and others to create vibrant colors in glass. Centuries later, settlers who immigrated to the Great Plains brought their stained glass traditions with them. In South Dakota, these colorful windows often tell the same stories as windows found in Europe and the Middle East about religion, art and memories.

The Buildings
Churches are most commonly associated with stained glass. Some windows depict biblical figures or stories and some are merely decorative. But not all stained glass is connected to religious communities. Throughout South Dakota there are buildings where stained glass tells stories of our state, individual communities, prominent families, epic events, or sometimes mystical people and places. The State Capitol building is home to many beautiful windows, but the art form is found across the state in schools, courthouses and homes.

The Present and Future
Many of the stained glass windows found across the state are showing the ravages of time. The restoration of a stained glass window is expensive and time consuming, but those who love and respect these beautiful pieces of history are finding ways to restore them. Creating stained glass remains a living art form, and many of today’s artists continue to carry on the storytelling tradition in their contemporary creations. Technology is allowing today’s craftsmen to create more contemporary designs with vivid color choices.

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SGLPTG
(D) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Chapter 3 - The Story Behind the Story Teller) Teacher’s Guide – Lower Left (PDF)

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA The Story Behind the Story Teller - Dr. Johnson relates how she researches stained glass windows in South Dakota and how she has learned about their history as well as the history of the people who purchased or created them. (Photos)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen.

Many communities across the state have used these stained glass windows to tell their stories – their connection to God, the homestead experience or life on the Great Plains. Windows can be found in private homes, churches, courthouse, schools, and even in barns.

The production looks at three broad topics.

The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains
Stained glass windows originally were developed in the Middle East. Early stained glass artists learned to use metals like gold, cobalt, copper and others to create vibrant colors in glass. Centuries later, settlers who immigrated to the Great Plains brought their stained glass traditions with them. In South Dakota, these colorful windows often tell the same stories as windows found in Europe and the Middle East about religion, art and memories.

The Buildings
Churches are most commonly associated with stained glass. Some windows depict biblical figures or stories and some are merely decorative. But not all stained glass is connected to religious communities. Throughout South Dakota there are buildings where stained glass tells stories of our state, individual communities, prominent families, epic events, or sometimes mystical people and places. The State Capitol building is home to many beautiful windows, but the art form is found across the state in schools, courthouses and homes.

The Present and Future
Many of the stained glass windows found across the state are showing the ravages of time. The restoration of a stained glass window is expensive and time consuming, but those who love and respect these beautiful pieces of history are finding ways to restore them. Creating stained glass remains a living art form, and many of today’s artists continue to carry on the storytelling tradition in their contemporary creations. Technology is allowing today’s craftsmen to create more contemporary designs with vivid color choices.

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SGLPTG
(E) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Chapter 4 - Native American Culture) Teacher’s Guide – Lower Left (PDF)

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA Native American Culture - The video reports on stained glass windows in South Dakota Indian reservations that relate Lakota spirituality. (Photos)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen.

Many communities across the state have used these stained glass windows to tell their stories – their connection to God, the homestead experience or life on the Great Plains. Windows can be found in private homes, churches, courthouse, schools, and even in barns.

The production looks at three broad topics.

The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains
Stained glass windows originally were developed in the Middle East. Early stained glass artists learned to use metals like gold, cobalt, copper and others to create vibrant colors in glass. Centuries later, settlers who immigrated to the Great Plains brought their stained glass traditions with them. In South Dakota, these colorful windows often tell the same stories as windows found in Europe and the Middle East about religion, art and memories.

The Buildings
Churches are most commonly associated with stained glass. Some windows depict biblical figures or stories and some are merely decorative. But not all stained glass is connected to religious communities. Throughout South Dakota there are buildings where stained glass tells stories of our state, individual communities, prominent families, epic events, or sometimes mystical people and places. The State Capitol building is home to many beautiful windows, but the art form is found across the state in schools, courthouses and homes.

The Present and Future
Many of the stained glass windows found across the state are showing the ravages of time. The restoration of a stained glass window is expensive and time consuming, but those who love and respect these beautiful pieces of history are finding ways to restore them. Creating stained glass remains a living art form, and many of today’s artists continue to carry on the storytelling tradition in their contemporary creations. Technology is allowing today’s craftsmen to create more contemporary designs with vivid color choices.

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SGLPTG
(F) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Chapter 5 - Reading the Windows) Teacher’s Guide – Lower Left (PDF)

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA Reading the Windows - The video visits Pierre and examines stained glass windows in the State Capitol as well as churches, considering the different ways that the windows tell stories, including their use of color. (Photos)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen.

Many communities across the state have used these stained glass windows to tell their stories – their connection to God, the homestead experience or life on the Great Plains. Windows can be found in private homes, churches, courthouse, schools, and even in barns.

The production looks at three broad topics.

The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains
Stained glass windows originally were developed in the Middle East. Early stained glass artists learned to use metals like gold, cobalt, copper and others to create vibrant colors in glass. Centuries later, settlers who immigrated to the Great Plains brought their stained glass traditions with them. In South Dakota, these colorful windows often tell the same stories as windows found in Europe and the Middle East about religion, art and memories.

The Buildings
Churches are most commonly associated with stained glass. Some windows depict biblical figures or stories and some are merely decorative. But not all stained glass is connected to religious communities. Throughout South Dakota there are buildings where stained glass tells stories of our state, individual communities, prominent families, epic events, or sometimes mystical people and places. The State Capitol building is home to many beautiful windows, but the art form is found across the state in schools, courthouses and homes.

The Present and Future
Many of the stained glass windows found across the state are showing the ravages of time. The restoration of a stained glass window is expensive and time consuming, but those who love and respect these beautiful pieces of history are finding ways to restore them. Creating stained glass remains a living art form, and many of today’s artists continue to carry on the storytelling tradition in their contemporary creations. Technology is allowing today’s craftsmen to create more contemporary designs with vivid color choices.

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SGLPTG
(G) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Chapter 6 - The Importance of Color) Teacher’s Guide – Lower Left (PDF)

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA The Importance of Color - The various meanings of colors in stained glass as well as the ways of producing color are explained. St. Anthony’s Church in Hoven has windows in the Munich Pictorial Style. The church is also an example of how local citizens used stained glass to promote local values. In depicting a Biblical story about Joseph, the father of Jesus, the early German settlers revised the story to emphasize German values. The stained glass windows of the VA Hospital in Hot Springs depict the values of the institution in the caring for wounded soldiers. (Photos)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen.

Many communities across the state have used these stained glass windows to tell their stories – their connection to God, the homestead experience or life on the Great Plains. Windows can be found in private homes, churches, courthouse, schools, and even in barns.

The production looks at three broad topics.

The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains
Stained glass windows originally were developed in the Middle East. Early stained glass artists learned to use metals like gold, cobalt, copper and others to create vibrant colors in glass. Centuries later, settlers who immigrated to the Great Plains brought their stained glass traditions with them. In South Dakota, these colorful windows often tell the same stories as windows found in Europe and the Middle East about religion, art and memories.

The Buildings
Churches are most commonly associated with stained glass. Some windows depict biblical figures or stories and some are merely decorative. But not all stained glass is connected to religious communities. Throughout South Dakota there are buildings where stained glass tells stories of our state, individual communities, prominent families, epic events, or sometimes mystical people and places. The State Capitol building is home to many beautiful windows, but the art form is found across the state in schools, courthouses and homes.

The Present and Future
Many of the stained glass windows found across the state are showing the ravages of time. The restoration of a stained glass window is expensive and time consuming, but those who love and respect these beautiful pieces of history are finding ways to restore them. Creating stained glass remains a living art form, and many of today’s artists continue to carry on the storytelling tradition in their contemporary creations. Technology is allowing today’s craftsmen to create more contemporary designs with vivid color choices.

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SGLPTG
(H) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Chapter 7 - Stained Glass in Our Homes) Teacher’s Guide – Lower Left (PDF)

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA Stained Glass in Our Homes - The video also visits two private homes with stained glass windows, noting that they can have more personal meanings as well. (Photos)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen.

Many communities across the state have used these stained glass windows to tell their stories – their connection to God, the homestead experience or life on the Great Plains. Windows can be found in private homes, churches, courthouse, schools, and even in barns.

The production looks at three broad topics.

The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains
Stained glass windows originally were developed in the Middle East. Early stained glass artists learned to use metals like gold, cobalt, copper and others to create vibrant colors in glass. Centuries later, settlers who immigrated to the Great Plains brought their stained glass traditions with them. In South Dakota, these colorful windows often tell the same stories as windows found in Europe and the Middle East about religion, art and memories.

The Buildings
Churches are most commonly associated with stained glass. Some windows depict biblical figures or stories and some are merely decorative. But not all stained glass is connected to religious communities. Throughout South Dakota there are buildings where stained glass tells stories of our state, individual communities, prominent families, epic events, or sometimes mystical people and places. The State Capitol building is home to many beautiful windows, but the art form is found across the state in schools, courthouses and homes.

The Present and Future
Many of the stained glass windows found across the state are showing the ravages of time. The restoration of a stained glass window is expensive and time consuming, but those who love and respect these beautiful pieces of history are finding ways to restore them. Creating stained glass remains a living art form, and many of today’s artists continue to carry on the storytelling tradition in their contemporary creations. Technology is allowing today’s craftsmen to create more contemporary designs with vivid color choices.

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SGLPTG
(I) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Chapter 8 - The Wild West) Teacher’s Guide – Lower Left (PDF)

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA The Wild West - The video visits Deadwood, where several stained glass windows from a now demolished historic church have been reused in newer buildings. Other windows rescued from old buildings are also seen. (Photos)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen.

Many communities across the state have used these stained glass windows to tell their stories – their connection to God, the homestead experience or life on the Great Plains. Windows can be found in private homes, churches, courthouse, schools, and even in barns.

The production looks at three broad topics.

The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains
Stained glass windows originally were developed in the Middle East. Early stained glass artists learned to use metals like gold, cobalt, copper and others to create vibrant colors in glass. Centuries later, settlers who immigrated to the Great Plains brought their stained glass traditions with them. In South Dakota, these colorful windows often tell the same stories as windows found in Europe and the Middle East about religion, art and memories.

The Buildings
Churches are most commonly associated with stained glass. Some windows depict biblical figures or stories and some are merely decorative. But not all stained glass is connected to religious communities. Throughout South Dakota there are buildings where stained glass tells stories of our state, individual communities, prominent families, epic events, or sometimes mystical people and places. The State Capitol building is home to many beautiful windows, but the art form is found across the state in schools, courthouses and homes.

The Present and Future
Many of the stained glass windows found across the state are showing the ravages of time. The restoration of a stained glass window is expensive and time consuming, but those who love and respect these beautiful pieces of history are finding ways to restore them. Creating stained glass remains a living art form, and many of today’s artists continue to carry on the storytelling tradition in their contemporary creations. Technology is allowing today’s craftsmen to create more contemporary designs with vivid color choices.

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SGLPTG
(J) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Chapter 9 - Protecting Stained Glass) Teacher’s Guide – Lower Left (PDF)

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA Protecting Stained Glass - A visit to a closed church in Zell raises the issue of preserving stained glass windows, which can be impossible to replace, and the importance of documenting and studying windows. The video also visits churches in Aberdeen, Sisseton, and Blue Cloud Abbey, in Marvin. (Photos)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen.

Many communities across the state have used these stained glass windows to tell their stories – their connection to God, the homestead experience or life on the Great Plains. Windows can be found in private homes, churches, courthouse, schools, and even in barns.

The production looks at three broad topics.

The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains
Stained glass windows originally were developed in the Middle East. Early stained glass artists learned to use metals like gold, cobalt, copper and others to create vibrant colors in glass. Centuries later, settlers who immigrated to the Great Plains brought their stained glass traditions with them. In South Dakota, these colorful windows often tell the same stories as windows found in Europe and the Middle East about religion, art and memories.

The Buildings
Churches are most commonly associated with stained glass. Some windows depict biblical figures or stories and some are merely decorative. But not all stained glass is connected to religious communities. Throughout South Dakota there are buildings where stained glass tells stories of our state, individual communities, prominent families, epic events, or sometimes mystical people and places. The State Capitol building is home to many beautiful windows, but the art form is found across the state in schools, courthouses and homes.

The Present and Future
Many of the stained glass windows found across the state are showing the ravages of time. The restoration of a stained glass window is expensive and time consuming, but those who love and respect these beautiful pieces of history are finding ways to restore them. Creating stained glass remains a living art form, and many of today’s artists continue to carry on the storytelling tradition in their contemporary creations. Technology is allowing today’s craftsmen to create more contemporary designs with vivid color choices.

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SGLPTG
(K) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Chapter 10 - Salvation to Forgiveness) Teacher’s Guide – Lower Left (PDF)

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA Salvation to Forgiveness - The state penitentiary in Sioux Falls features stained glass windows made by a prisoner. (Photos)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen.

Many communities across the state have used these stained glass windows to tell their stories – their connection to God, the homestead experience or life on the Great Plains. Windows can be found in private homes, churches, courthouse, schools, and even in barns.

The production looks at three broad topics.

The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains
Stained glass windows originally were developed in the Middle East. Early stained glass artists learned to use metals like gold, cobalt, copper and others to create vibrant colors in glass. Centuries later, settlers who immigrated to the Great Plains brought their stained glass traditions with them. In South Dakota, these colorful windows often tell the same stories as windows found in Europe and the Middle East about religion, art and memories.

The Buildings
Churches are most commonly associated with stained glass. Some windows depict biblical figures or stories and some are merely decorative. But not all stained glass is connected to religious communities. Throughout South Dakota there are buildings where stained glass tells stories of our state, individual communities, prominent families, epic events, or sometimes mystical people and places. The State Capitol building is home to many beautiful windows, but the art form is found across the state in schools, courthouses and homes.

The Present and Future
Many of the stained glass windows found across the state are showing the ravages of time. The restoration of a stained glass window is expensive and time consuming, but those who love and respect these beautiful pieces of history are finding ways to restore them. Creating stained glass remains a living art form, and many of today’s artists continue to carry on the storytelling tradition in their contemporary creations. Technology is allowing today’s craftsmen to create more contemporary designs with vivid color choices.

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SGLPTG
(L) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Chapter 11 - Historic to Present) Teacher’s Guide – Lower Left (PDF)

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA Historic to Present - Sioux Falls is home to many buildings with stained glass windows, including some by noted artist Louis Comfort Tiffany. Dakota Stained Glass in Sioux Falls restores and preserves stained glass windows. (Photos)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen.

Many communities across the state have used these stained glass windows to tell their stories – their connection to God, the homestead experience or life on the Great Plains. Windows can be found in private homes, churches, courthouse, schools, and even in barns.

The production looks at three broad topics.

The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains
Stained glass windows originally were developed in the Middle East. Early stained glass artists learned to use metals like gold, cobalt, copper and others to create vibrant colors in glass. Centuries later, settlers who immigrated to the Great Plains brought their stained glass traditions with them. In South Dakota, these colorful windows often tell the same stories as windows found in Europe and the Middle East about religion, art and memories.

The Buildings
Churches are most commonly associated with stained glass. Some windows depict biblical figures or stories and some are merely decorative. But not all stained glass is connected to religious communities. Throughout South Dakota there are buildings where stained glass tells stories of our state, individual communities, prominent families, epic events, or sometimes mystical people and places. The State Capitol building is home to many beautiful windows, but the art form is found across the state in schools, courthouses and homes.

The Present and Future
Many of the stained glass windows found across the state are showing the ravages of time. The restoration of a stained glass window is expensive and time consuming, but those who love and respect these beautiful pieces of history are finding ways to restore them. Creating stained glass remains a living art form, and many of today’s artists continue to carry on the storytelling tradition in their contemporary creations. Technology is allowing today’s craftsmen to create more contemporary designs with vivid color choices.

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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(M) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Chapter 12 - Preserving History) Teacher’s Guide – Lower Left (PDF)

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA Preserving History - After a few summary comments, a final montage shows images of stained glass windows from all the buildings visited in the video. (Photos)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen.

Many communities across the state have used these stained glass windows to tell their stories – their connection to God, the homestead experience or life on the Great Plains. Windows can be found in private homes, churches, courthouse, schools, and even in barns.

The production looks at three broad topics.

The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains
Stained glass windows originally were developed in the Middle East. Early stained glass artists learned to use metals like gold, cobalt, copper and others to create vibrant colors in glass. Centuries later, settlers who immigrated to the Great Plains brought their stained glass traditions with them. In South Dakota, these colorful windows often tell the same stories as windows found in Europe and the Middle East about religion, art and memories.

The Buildings
Churches are most commonly associated with stained glass. Some windows depict biblical figures or stories and some are merely decorative. But not all stained glass is connected to religious communities. Throughout South Dakota there are buildings where stained glass tells stories of our state, individual communities, prominent families, epic events, or sometimes mystical people and places. The State Capitol building is home to many beautiful windows, but the art form is found across the state in schools, courthouses and homes.

The Present and Future
Many of the stained glass windows found across the state are showing the ravages of time. The restoration of a stained glass window is expensive and time consuming, but those who love and respect these beautiful pieces of history are finding ways to restore them. Creating stained glass remains a living art form, and many of today’s artists continue to carry on the storytelling tradition in their contemporary creations. Technology is allowing today’s craftsmen to create more contemporary designs with vivid color choices.

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SGLPTG

South Dakota Public Broadcasting
Education and Outreach Department
(800) 456-0766 | Edservices@sdpb.org