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Buddy's Book Club: You are My Wish Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

You are My Wish (SD Library Search) by Maryann Cusimano Love, Philomel Books - Do you like spending time with your grandmother…? So do I! We make cookies, read together and play games. I wonder what other kids do with their grandmothers? Read You are My Wish to see what grandma bears do with their grandbears. 

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 1a - Trouble At School (Owáyawa-ta Wóiyotiyekiye) Activity Ideas Below Description

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Resources (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

The Berenstain Bears (Click "Caregivers")

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
Brother has been kept home from school for a few days with the flu and neglects to do the schoolwork that Sister delivered from his teacher. As a result, Brother’s next math test mark is zero and he doesn’t know how to break the bad news to Mama and Papa. He turns to Gramps and Gran for help and learns that getting a problem out in the open, goes a long way toward solving it. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla tónačhaŋ khúža čha wayáwa í šni. Čhaŋkhé waúŋspekhiye kiŋ thiyáta takúku awówaši ečhúŋ čhíŋ éyaš wówapi eyá iyáyekhiye kiŋ átaš él étuŋwe šni. Yuŋkȟáŋ heháŋl wayáwa khí na wówiyawa wóuŋspe iyútȟapi k’uŋ héhaŋ taŋyáŋkel ečhúŋ šni. Húŋku kiŋ é na atkúku kiŋ onáȟ’uŋwičhayiŋ kta ikȟópȟa čha tȟuŋkášitku kiŋ é na kȟúŋšitku kiŋ wóokiye wičhákila. Wahókuŋkhiyapi na tókhel wóglušna aphíkiyiŋ kte héči okíyakapi. Hetáŋ wóuŋspe waŋ waŋkátuya čha ičú.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version? (Arthur Emotion Interactive for Children)

Search the SDLN Library Card Catalog for the books at your library or receive them on loan.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Weekdays, 1:00pm CT
Lakota Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV Ch3, Sundays, 9:00am CT (watch online)

Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher. Printable images of the characters from the program. (Select a character by clicking the picture. The character images should be used if a child cannot read the word mother, father, brother or sister.)
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 1b - Visit the Dentist (Hiáphiye ektá) Activity Ideas Below Description

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Resources (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

The Berenstain Bears (Click "Caregivers")

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
When Sister gets her first loose tooth, Brother teases her that the dentist will extract it with a big yanking tool. After Sister watches Brother get a cavity filled, she discovers that her dentist is a very gentle fellow and he assures her that most baby teeth don’t need yanking. They fall out all on their own. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ tȟokéya hí waŋ oglógleke. Matȟó Hokšíla gluškéhaŋ na hiáphiye kiŋ iyúžipa tȟáŋka uŋ kíčiyužuŋ kta kéye. Yuŋkȟáŋ Matȟó Hokšíla íŋš-eyá hí waŋ oȟlóke ló. Aphíkičičhiye k’uŋ héhaŋ tȟaŋkšítku waŋyáŋg nážiŋ yuŋkȟáŋ owáhečheča. Hiáphiye kiŋ hé iwáštegla khuwá kta čha akíbleziŋ na agná hé kičhí wóglaka yuŋkȟáŋ hí k’uŋ hé takómni nažúŋ kta čha iníhiŋčiyiŋ kte šni kéye.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version? (Arthur Emotion Interactive for Children)

Search the SDLN Library Card Catalog for the books at your library or receive them on loan.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Weekdays, 1:00pm CT
Lakota Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV Ch3, Sundays, 9:00am CT (watch online)

Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher. Printable images of the characters from the program. (Select a character by clicking the picture. The character images should be used if a child cannot read the word mother, father, brother or sister.)

Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 2a - Mighty Milton (Wóšikšičeka Waŋ Iglúwičakȟe) Activity Ideas Below Description

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Resources (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

The Berenstain Bears (Click "Caregivers")

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
When a new cub at school is teased by Too-Tall and the gang for his lack of sporting ability, Brother takes it upon himself to help his new friend renew his self-esteem by finding value in the things he can do well. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Owáyawa-ta wayáwa waŋ lečhála í yuŋkȟáŋ Háŋskela é na kȟoláwičhaye kiŋ ób šičáya khuwápi na škalwáyuphike šni kiŋ uŋ iȟáȟapi. Yuŋkȟáŋ Matȟó Hokšíla úŋšila na táku iwáyuphika héči hená slolkíyiŋ kta čha ókiye. Héčhel yuwáš’akiŋ na nakúŋ iglúonihaŋ kta čha íyopaštakiŋ kte.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version? (Arthur Emotion Interactive for Children)

Search the SDLN Library Card Catalog for the books at your library or receive them on loan.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Weekdays, 1:00pm CT
Lakota Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV Ch3, Sundays, 9:00am CT (watch online)

Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher. Printable images of the characters from the program. (Select a character by clicking the picture. The character images should be used if a child cannot read the word mother, father, brother or sister.)
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 2b Mama’s New Job (Húŋkupi kiŋ wówaši lečhála tȟáwa kiŋ) Activity Ideas Below Description

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Resources (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

The Berenstain Bears (Click "Caregivers")

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
When Mama decides to open her own quilt shop, Papa and the cubs are convinced they won’t be able to cope around the house without her. However it’s only when they stop thinking about themselves and start thinking about supporting Mama and her new endeavor do Papa and the cubs band together to share the load and make it work. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla húŋku kiŋ owíŋža paškíškapi owíyopȟeye waŋží íŋyaŋgkhiyiŋ kta gluštáŋ. Ho éyaš atkúku kiŋ é na čhiŋčála kiŋ išnála taŋyáŋ thiglépi okíhipi šni kéčhaŋič’iŋpi. Kítaŋȟčiŋ awáič’ičhiŋpi kiŋ hé ayúštaŋpi yuŋkȟáŋ tókheškhe húŋku kiŋ wówaši ečhúŋ kta patítaŋpi kta héči awáčhiŋpi okíhipi. Ptáyela wówaši ečhúŋpi háŋtaŋš táku ke éyaš ečhél ikíčiyayapi kta čha akíblezapi.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version? (Arthur Emotion Interactive for Children)

Search the SDLN Library Card Catalog for the books at your library or receive them on loan.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Weekdays, 1:00pm CT
Lakota Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV Ch3, Sundays, 9:00am CT (watch online)

Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher. Printable images of the characters from the program. (Select a character by clicking the picture. The character images should be used if a child cannot read the word mother, father, brother or sister.)
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 3a - Go To School (Wayáwapi) Activity Ideas Below Description

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Resources (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

The Berenstain Bears (Click "Caregivers")

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
Too-Tall and the gang amuse themselves at Sister’s expense by warning her how hard third grade will be and how strict Teacher Jane is. Brother tries unsuccessfully to convince Sis not to worry. Mama reminisces about Sister starting kindergarten and reflects on how her daughter’s feelings back then were exactly the same. Sure enough, when Sister starts grade three she enjoys the new experience just like she did when she started kindergarten. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Háŋskela é na kȟoláwičhaye kiŋ ób Matȟó Hokšíla tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ oštéšteya khuwápi. Wóuŋspe ičíyamni kiŋ oéčhuŋ šíča kéyapi, ho naháŋ waúŋspewičhakhiya waŋ Jane ečíyapi kiŋ hé očhíŋšiča kéyapi. Matȟó Hokšíla čhaŋl’ásniye wačhíŋ yéš áta héčhena kigná-phičašniyaŋ iníhaŋ. Ho éyaš húŋku kiŋ wakíksuye-khiya yuŋkȟáŋ héhaŋni iyéčheȟčiŋ wačhíŋyuza čha kiksúye. Ho éyaš húŋku kiŋ tókhel wíyukčaŋ kiŋ ečhéȟčiŋ iyéčhetu yuŋkȟáŋ Matȟó hokšíla tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ wóuŋspe ičíyamni kiŋ ektá ópȟa háŋl húŋku kiŋ iyéčhel íŋš-eyá iyókiphiič’iye.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version? (Arthur Emotion Interactive for Children)

Search the SDLN Library Card Catalog for the books at your library or receive them on loan.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Weekdays, 1:00pm CT
Lakota Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV Ch3, Sundays, 9:00am CT (watch online)

Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher. Printable images of the characters from the program. (Select a character by clicking the picture. The character images should be used if a child cannot read the word mother, father, brother or sister.)

Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 3b - A Week at Grandma’s (Tȟokȟáŋl Thiíyuŋkapi) Activity Ideas Below Description

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Resources (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

The Berenstain Bears (Click "Caregivers")

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
When Mama and Papa go off on a second honeymoon, Brother and Sister are certain they’re in for the most boring time of their lives spending an entire week with their grandparents. However the cubs’ preconception that old people are boring does a complete turnaround as they end up having an even better time than their parents - thanks to their anything but boring grandparents. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla húŋku na atkúku kiŋ okíčhiyuze wókiksuye uŋ tȟáŋtaŋhaŋ wóasnikiye ičúpi kte. Yuŋkȟáŋ Matȟó Hokšíla é na tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ oíyokiphi yuhápi kte šni kéčhaŋič’iŋpi, ičhíŋ okó waŋží heháŋyaŋ átaya kȟúŋšitku thí kiŋ ektá yaŋkápi kta čha hé uŋ. Ho éyaš ipáweȟya awíwičhayukčaŋpi čha akíblezapi ičhíŋ wakáŋla kiŋ henáos áta khilípi na héčhiya ókowaŋžila okhílita. Iyé thípi kiŋ hétu ke éyaš héčhel iyókiphiič’iyapi šni.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version? (Arthur Emotion Interactive for Children)

Search the SDLN Library Card Catalog for the books at your library or receive them on loan.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Weekdays, 1:00pm CT
Lakota Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV Ch3, Sundays, 9:00am CT (watch online)

Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher. Printable images of the characters from the program. (Select a character by clicking the picture. The character images should be used if a child cannot read the word mother, father, brother or sister.)
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 4a - Trouble With Pets (Waníyaŋpi waŋ theȟíya awáŋyaŋkapi) Activity Ideas Below Description

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Resources (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

The Berenstain Bears (Click "Caregivers")

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
Brother and Sister adopt one of Farmer Ben’s new puppies and soon discover that having a pet is a big responsibility. When the two pet owners leave to play with friends, the puppy stays behind and destroys the living room. As a result, the puppy is banished to the backyard. Brother and Sister apologize for neglecting their duties and Mama and Papa decide to give the cubs and the puppy a second chance. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Wóžu wičháša waŋ Ben ečíyapi kiŋ šuŋȟpála eyá lečhála wičhátȟuŋpi čha wičháyuha yuŋkȟáŋ Matȟó Hokšíla é na tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ waŋží waníyaŋpi s’e yuhápi. Éyaš itȟáhena wóiksape tȟáŋka čha ablézapi. Watóhaŋl kȟoláwičhayapi kiŋ ób škátapi kta čha éna yaŋké-khiyapi yuŋkȟáŋ tȟokȟáŋl úŋpi kiŋ hé ečhúŋhaŋ šuŋȟpála k’uŋ hé oásnikiye kiŋ áta iháŋgwičhakhiye. Hé uŋ thilázata ečé yuhá iyówiŋkhiyapi na ečhél šuŋȟpála tȟáwapi kiŋ él éwačhiŋpi šni kiŋ hé awíčhakičiktuŋžapi kta wičhákilapi. Yuŋkȟáŋ heháŋl húŋkupi na atkúkupi nuphíŋ phiyá awáŋyaŋg iyútȟe-wičhakhiyapi kta gluštáŋpi.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version? (Arthur Emotion Interactive for Children)

Search the SDLN Library Card Catalog for the books at your library or receive them on loan.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Weekdays, 1:00pm CT
Lakota Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV Ch3, Sundays, 9:00am CT (watch online)

Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher. Printable images of the characters from the program. (Select a character by clicking the picture. The character images should be used if a child cannot read the word mother, father, brother or sister.)
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 4b The Sitter (Hokší Awáŋyaŋke Kiŋ) Activity Ideas Below Description

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Resources (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

The Berenstain Bears (Click "Caregivers")

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
Brother and Sister do some damage in Mrs. Grizzle’s flowerbed while retrieving their baseball. Instead of stepping forward to apologize, the cubs get nervous and run home. As fate would have it, Mama arranges for Mrs. Grizzle to babysit the cubs that very night. Brother and Sister anticipate a very stern talking to, but are surprised by Mrs. Grizzle’s kindhearted manner. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla é na tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ Matȟóȟota Wiŋ wanáȟča owóžu tȟáwa kiŋ ektá tȟápa okílepi yuŋkȟáŋ wanúŋ alíliya iháŋgyapi. Šičáya ečhúŋpi kiŋ hé gluwáštepi šni yešáŋ sígluhapi na thiyáta khípi. Ho čha húŋkupi kiŋ ektáwapȟaya kiŋ Matȟóȟota Wiŋ awáŋwičhayaŋkiŋ kta kéye k’uŋ héhaŋ íyowičhaktekiŋ kta ikȟópȟapi. Ečháŋleš, Matȟóȟota Wiŋ taŋyáŋ wičhákhuwa na tókȟa yawá šni s’e ophíič’iye.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version? (Arthur Emotion Interactive for Children)

Search the SDLN Library Card Catalog for the books at your library or receive them on loan.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Weekdays, 1:00pm CT
Lakota Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV Ch3, Sundays, 9:00am CT (watch online)

Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher. Printable images of the characters from the program. (Select a character by clicking the picture. The character images should be used if a child cannot read the word mother, father, brother or sister.)

Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 5a Too Much TV (Wičhítenaškaŋškaŋ Kiŋ Etáŋhaŋ Iglúȟlayapi) Activity Ideas Below Description

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Resources (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

The Berenstain Bears (Click "Caregivers")

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
When Mama puts a ban on television watching for one whole week, the cubs initially go into hysterics. As the week unfolds, Brother, Sister and Papa too, find that their interests extend well beyond the television set. They grow to realize just how entertaining the great outdoors and other "simple" pleasures can be. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Okó waŋží átaya, Matȟó hokšíla húŋku kiŋ tuwéni wičhítenaškaŋškaŋ waŋyáŋg yaŋká iyówiŋwičhakhiyiŋ kte šni kéye. Tȟokéya čhiŋčála kiŋ líla iwáčhiŋkȟopi na tókheškhe imáǧaǧaič’iyapi-ka núŋ tkȟá. Ho éyaš óčibčib takúku tȟókeča, tȟaŋkál škátapi ešá, ečhúŋphiča na oíyokiphi čha ablés áyapi.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version? (Arthur Emotion Interactive for Children)

Search the SDLN Library Card Catalog for the books at your library or receive them on loan.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Weekdays, 1:00pm CT
Lakota Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV Ch3, Sundays, 9:00am CT (watch online)

Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher. Printable images of the characters from the program. (Select a character by clicking the picture. The character images should be used if a child cannot read the word mother, father, brother or sister.)
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 5b Trick or Treat (Itóǧiŋ Kitȟúŋpi) Activity Ideas Below Description

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Resources (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

The Berenstain Bears (Click "Caregivers")

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
Brother and Sister plan to avoid Widder Jones’ house when they go trick or treating because neighborhood lore has it that she’s a witch. Mama knows Widder Jones personally and tells the cubs what a sweet person she is. When the evening is over the cubs agree with Mama. They enjoyed visiting Widder Jones more than anyone else that Halloween. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla é na tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ thiíyaza čhaŋmháŋska lápi kiŋháŋ Hičhóla Wiŋ thí kiŋ etáŋ ȟeyáb ečhúŋpi kta awáčhiŋpi. Ho éyaš húŋkupi kiŋ Hičhóla Wiŋ taŋyáŋ slolyá čha wíŋyaŋ oȟ’áŋwašte héčha kéya owíčhakiyake. Aŋpétu haŋkéyela íŋš-eyá héčhel wačhíŋkiyuzapi ičhíŋ athílehaŋyaŋg ípi na hé kičhí iyótaŋ oíyokiphi yuhápi.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version? (Arthur Emotion Interactive for Children)

Search the SDLN Library Card Catalog for the books at your library or receive them on loan.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Weekdays, 1:00pm CT
Lakota Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV Ch3, Sundays, 9:00am CT (watch online)

Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher. Printable images of the characters from the program. (Select a character by clicking the picture. The character images should be used if a child cannot read the word mother, father, brother or sister.)
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 6a - Trouble With Money (Mázaska Kamná Sáŋm Iyéič’iyapi”) Activity Ideas Below Description

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Resources (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

The Berenstain Bears (Click "Caregivers")

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
When Mama and Papa refuse to buy Brother and Sister trendy overly expensive sport shirts, the cubs decide to earn the money themselves. However the cubs go overboard and get so caught up in everything from lemonade stands to dog walking services that they leave themselves no time for their friends. It’s only when they finally reach their goal that Brother and Sister realize the price tag has turned out to a lot bigger than they thought. Their blind pursuit of material things has cost them their friends. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla é na tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ ógle othéȟiȟika eyá čhíŋpi éyaš húŋkupi na atkúkupi opȟéwičhakičatȟuŋpi kte šni kéyapi. Ho čha iyéčhiŋka mázaska iglámnapi na opȟéič’itȟuŋpi kta gluštáŋpi. Sáŋm iyéič’iyapi na wówaši ečé ečhúŋpi čha ablézapišniyaŋ okȟólawičhayapi kiŋ átaya él éwičhawačhiŋpi šni. Haŋkéya táku čhíŋpi kiŋ hená yuhápi yuŋkȟáŋ tóhaŋni wóyuha ímnaič’iyapi kta okíhipi šni čha aíč’iblezapi. Okȟólawičhayapi na thiwáhe kiŋ hená é čha waŋkátuya wičháglawapi kta tkȟá.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version? (Arthur Emotion Interactive for Children)

Search the SDLN Library Card Catalog for the books at your library or receive them on loan.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Weekdays, 1:00pm CT
Lakota Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV Ch3, Sundays, 9:00am CT (watch online)

Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher. Printable images of the characters from the program. (Select a character by clicking the picture. The character images should be used if a child cannot read the word mother, father, brother or sister.)
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 6b - Double Dare (Sémni Eyá Wapáǧeyapi) Activity Ideas Below Description

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Resources (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

The Berenstain Bears (Click "Caregivers")

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
Brother displays some real moxie when he attempts to get back Sister’s skipping rope from Too-Tall and his mischievous gang. Too-Tall thinks Brother has what it takes to join his gang. After Brother becomes a member he’s required to follow the leader...and that means trespassing on Farmer Ben’s property to swipe watermelons. Brother is the only one caught and Farmer Ben has a heart to heart talk with him about how to deal with peer pressure. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla tȟaŋkšítku čhaŋtét’iŋsya anákičikšiŋ na Háŋskela wíkȟaŋ inápsilyapi waŋ amánuŋ kiŋ hé ikíčiču wačhíŋ. Yuŋkȟáŋ Háŋskela waȟtéšni hokšíla optáye tȟáwa kiŋ Matȟó Hokšíla ópȟakhiye aphé. Matȟó Hokšíla iyówiŋyaŋ čha wóžu wičháša Ben tȟa-wóžu kiŋ ektá yíŋ na wagmúšpaŋšni manúŋ ší. Ho éyaš, wóžu wičháša Ben é čha Matȟó Hokšíla ečéla íyašlalyiŋ na tókhel wówiyutaŋ šíča etáŋ iglúȟeyapȟaya kta okíhi héči iwáhokuŋkhiye.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version? (Arthur Emotion Interactive for Children)

Search the SDLN Library Card Catalog for the books at your library or receive them on loan.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Weekdays, 1:00pm CT
Lakota Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV Ch3, Sundays, 9:00am CT (watch online)

Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher. Printable images of the characters from the program. (Select a character by clicking the picture. The character images should be used if a child cannot read the word mother, father, brother or sister.)
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 7a - Out For the Team (Tȟab’ápȟa Akíčhiyapi) Activity Ideas Below Description

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Resources (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

The Berenstain Bears (Click "Caregivers")

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
Brother and Sister are good baseball players and both sign up to try out for the Bear Country Cardinals. The problem is, there’s only one position left on the team. Worried about the humiliating possibility of losing to his talented kid sister, Brother backs out of the competition. Sister has some encouraging words for Brother which inspires him to stick with it. The two cubs practice for the big tryout together. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla é na tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ tȟab’ápȟa wóphikapi naháŋ nakúŋ nuphíŋ Bear Country Cardinals ób škátapi kte ȟčiŋ. Akšáka waŋžíla ópȟakhiyapi kte kéyapi yuŋkȟáŋ Matȟó Hokšíla tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ kȟapȟíŋ kte šni ikȟópȟa čha íyaikpat’o. Ho éyaš iyénayiŋ kte šni čha, tȟaŋkšítku glawáš’akiŋ na okášpe k’uŋ hé uŋmá kaȟníǧapi kte itȟókab ókičhiyapi na ptáyela iíglutȟapi.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version? (Arthur Emotion Interactive for Children)

Search the SDLN Library Card Catalog for the books at your library or receive them on loan.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Weekdays, 1:00pm CT
Lakota Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV Ch3, Sundays, 9:00am CT (watch online)

Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher. Printable images of the characters from the program. (Select a character by clicking the picture. The character images should be used if a child cannot read the word mother, father, brother or sister.)
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 7b - Count Their Blessings (Wówašte Glawápi) Activity Ideas Below Description

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Resources (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

The Berenstain Bears (Click "Caregivers")

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
Brother and Sister often complain that their friends have more things than they do. Mama and Papa tell them they should be thankful for all the things they do have. When a big thunderstorm rages outside and the power goes out, the cubs are reminded of how fortunate they are to have loving parents and a cozy home to live in. It’s a good time to count their blessings. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla é na tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ okȟólawičhayapi kiŋ wičhísaŋm wayúhapi čha ináwičhakiwizipi na iglášičapi. Húŋkupi na atkúkupi tákuni ičákižešniyaŋ úŋpi čha wičhákičiksuyapi na táku yuhápi kiŋ iyúha phikílapi kta iyéčheča kéyapi. Yuŋkȟáŋ Wakíŋyaŋ ukíyiŋ na líla maǧážu na tȟatéyaŋpa čha wakȟáŋgli waníče éyaš thimá tóna thewíčhaȟilapi na taŋyáŋ ičháȟwičhayapi kiŋ hená ób očhósya yaŋkápi. Ho čha hé uŋ tȟawáčhiŋ kiksúyapi na wówašte kiŋ iyúha glawápi na wóphila yuhápi.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version? (Arthur Emotion Interactive for Children)

Search the SDLN Library Card Catalog for the books at your library or receive them on loan.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Weekdays, 1:00pm CT
Lakota Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV Ch3, Sundays, 9:00am CT (watch online)

Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher. Printable images of the characters from the program. (Select a character by clicking the picture. The character images should be used if a child cannot read the word mother, father, brother or sister.)
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 8a - Slumber Party (Thiíyuŋg Wičhákičhopi) Activity Ideas Below Description

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Resources (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

The Berenstain Bears (Click "Caregivers")

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
Ensured by Sister that she knows the meaning of responsibility, Mama and Papa allow her to go to a sleep over at Lizzy’s house. However Mama and Papa are totally unaware that the Bruins have gone out and left a babysitter in charge. When practically every cub in town shows up at the party it gets so out of hand that when the Bruins return they call all the parents to come and take their cubs home. Although Mama and Papa agree that Sister is partially to blame, they also realize that if they had been a little more responsible themselves, they would have found out about the baby sitter early enough to nip it in the bud. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ maškéku Lizzy ečíyapi é čha thiíyuŋg kičhó. Húŋkupi na atkúkupi kiŋ ób wóglakiŋ na wówačhiŋye kéya wičháyaečheča čha haŋyúŋkiŋ kta iyówiŋkhiyapi. Ho éyaš Lizzy atkúku é na húŋku kiŋ tókhiyayapi na éeye wikȟóškalaka waŋ hokší-awaŋyaŋkiŋ kte éyaš slolyápi šni. Wičhákičhopi kiŋ ektá líla wičhóta yuŋkȟáŋ líla ok’óka ho čha Lizzy atkúku na húŋku khípi k’uŋ héhaŋ iyúha khigléwičhakhiyapi. Matȟó Hokšíla tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ uŋšpá iyáuŋpapi éyaš íŋš-eyá iyáuŋpephičapi čha aíč’iblezapi ičhíŋ Lizzy atkúku é na húŋku kiŋ él úŋpi kte šni čha slolyápi kta tkȟá.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version? (Arthur Emotion Interactive for Children)

Search the SDLN Library Card Catalog for the books at your library or receive them on loan.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Weekdays, 1:00pm CT
Lakota Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV Ch3, Sundays, 9:00am CT (watch online)

Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher. Printable images of the characters from the program. (Select a character by clicking the picture. The character images should be used if a child cannot read the word mother, father, brother or sister.)
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 8b - Homework Hassle (Wóuŋspe Wówaši) Activity Ideas Below Description

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Resources (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

The Berenstain Bears (Click "Caregivers")

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
Brother complains that he’s given too much homework and that’s why he has fallen so far behind at school. Papa blames it on his highly distractive study environment and until Brother gets caught up, there’ll be no television, video games, loud music or chatting on the phone. When Brother decides to do a little homework every night, he finds it’s much easier to stay on top of his workload. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla waúŋspekhiye kiŋ wówaši eháš óta yuhá thiyáta khiglékhiye s’a na uŋ owáyawa-ta taŋyáŋ iglóaye šni kéye. Atkúku kiŋ héčhetula šni na táku óta, wičhítenaškaŋškaŋ na wakȟáŋgli wóškate, na omás’apȟela, na wóolowaŋ kiŋ henákeča iyáuŋpe-phiča kéye. Ho čha ȟtayétu iyóhila haŋkéke awówaši ečhúŋ kta gluštáŋ k’uŋ heháŋtaŋ akhé taŋyáŋ wayúštaŋ s’eléčheča.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version? (Arthur Emotion Interactive for Children)

Search the SDLN Library Card Catalog for the books at your library or receive them on loan.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Weekdays, 1:00pm CT
Lakota Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV Ch3, Sundays, 9:00am CT (watch online)

Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher. Printable images of the characters from the program. (Select a character by clicking the picture. The character images should be used if a child cannot read the word mother, father, brother or sister.)
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 9a - The Talent Show (Wówayuphike Kpazópi) Activity Ideas Below Description

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Resources (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

The Berenstain Bears (Click "Caregivers")

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
Convinced that he doesn’t have any talent to offer for the upcoming school talent show, Brother is recruited to be the talent scout. Guided by Teacher Bob’s conviction that everyone has talent, Brother helps the other cubs discover their own special talents, and in so doing, discovers he also has a talent just as Teacher Bob suspected - a talent for finding talent. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Owáyawa-ta wówayuphike akíčhiyapi kta háŋl Matȟó Hokšíla ikpási yuŋkȟáŋ tákuni iwáyuphike šni ič’íla. Čha hé uŋ tóna takúku iwáyuphikapi héči hená owíčhale kta kaȟníǧapi. Hetáŋ tóna iyéwičhaya héči hená wówayuphike kiŋ iyékiyapi kta čha ówičhakiye. Ečhúŋhaŋ íŋš-eyá wówayuphike kiŋ iyékiye. Wówayuphike kiŋ iyékiyapi kta čha ówičhakiye kiŋ hé wówayuphike tȟáwa kiŋ hé é čha iyékiye.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version? (Arthur Emotion Interactive for Children)

Search the SDLN Library Card Catalog for the books at your library or receive them on loan.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Weekdays, 1:00pm CT
Lakota Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV Ch3, Sundays, 9:00am CT (watch online)

Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher. Printable images of the characters from the program. (Select a character by clicking the picture. The character images should be used if a child cannot read the word mother, father, brother or sister.)
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 9b - The Haunted Lighthouse (Thiyóžaŋžaŋ) Activity Ideas Below Description

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Resources (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

The Berenstain Bears (Click "Caregivers")

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
When the Bear Family vacations in an old lighthouse rendered obsolete by modern technology, they discover that it’s rumored to be haunted. Although the cubs encounter mysterious sights and sounds, they’re anything but spooked. In fact Brother and Sister actively pursue the clues to the point where they not only reveal the ’ghost’ but come up with a way to give new life to the old lighthouse as well as the old lighthouse keeper. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla thiwáhe kiŋ thiyóžaŋžaŋ waŋ ektá wóasnikiye yuhápi yuŋkȟáŋ hél naǧítȟuŋpi kéyapi čha naȟ’úŋpi. Táku okáȟniȟ-phiča šni séče kiŋ hená kȟokípȟapi šni éyaš éeye tókhel okíhipika iwápasipi na ečhél wanáǧi séče kiŋ yuákaŋl ičúpi. Naháŋ nakúŋ tókhel thiyóžaŋžaŋ tȟaŋníla kiŋ hé é na awáŋyaŋke kiŋ akhé uŋphíča héči oyákapi.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version? (Arthur Emotion Interactive for Children)

Search the SDLN Library Card Catalog for the books at your library or receive them on loan.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Weekdays, 1:00pm CT
Lakota Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV Ch3, Sundays, 9:00am CT (watch online)

Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher. Printable images of the characters from the program. (Select a character by clicking the picture. The character images should be used if a child cannot read the word mother, father, brother or sister.)
The Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 10a - The Birthday Boy (Tȟúŋpi Aŋpétu Kiŋ) Activity Ideas Below Description

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Resources (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

The Berenstain Bears (Click "Caregivers")

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
With Mama and Papa too busy setting up Brother’s birthday party, Sister reluctantly decides to do her 'Tell Us About A Family Member' school assignment on Brother. However videotaping him for her project not only allows her to see a side of him she never saw before, it helps her realize just how much her big brother really means to her. Ultimately not only is Sister’s Birthday Boy video an A+ project, it also doubles as Brother’s best birthday gift ever. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ owáyawa uŋ tȟáŋtaŋhaŋ itówapinaškaŋškaŋyaŋpi waŋží káǧiŋ kte héčha. Ho éyaš húŋku é na atkúku tȟúŋpi aŋpétu wičhákičhopi tȟáwa kiŋ yuhá škáŋpi čha thiblóku éha kpasí na itówapinaškaŋškaŋyaŋpi waŋ káǧiŋ kta gluštáŋ. Héčhuŋ ečhúŋhaŋ tȟogyé awíyukčaŋ na líla waŋkátuya glawá čha aíč’ibleze. Owáyawa-ta wóohiye káǧiŋ na nakúŋ thiblóku tȟúŋpi aŋpétu wawíčhak’upi waŋ iyótaŋ wašté čha kíčaǧe.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version? (Arthur Emotion Interactive for Children)

Search the SDLN Library Card Catalog for the books at your library or receive them on loan.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Weekdays, 1:00pm CT
Lakota Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV Ch3, Sundays, 9:00am CT (watch online)

Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher. Printable images of the characters from the program. (Select a character by clicking the picture. The character images should be used if a child cannot read the word mother, father, brother or sister.)

The Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 10b - The Green Eyed Monster (Wónawizi) Activity Ideas Below Description

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Resources (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

The Berenstain Bears (Click "Caregivers")

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
When Brother gets a brand new three speed racer, Sister’s envious feelings are personified in her dreams by a little green version of herself. This Green Eyed Monster convinces Sister to sneak brother’s new bike out for a ride but when she does, Sister realizes too late that it’s too big for her and she can’t control it. Fortunately Brother and Papa rescue Sister before Brother’s bike can crash, and then together they help chase the Green Eyed Monster away by jazzing up Brother’s old bike and giving it to Sister. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla hunáhomnipi waŋ lečhála čha k’úpi yuŋkȟáŋ tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ inákiwizi. Wóihaŋble él wóanawizi kiŋ hé tȟaŋíŋič’iya yuŋkȟáŋ kȟáŋšnišniyela iyé iyéčheča éyaš isáŋm čísčila naháŋ tȟaŋátaya tȟózi. Líla iyútaŋyiŋ na gnáyaŋ čha thiblóku tȟa-húnahomnipi kiŋ ékhi na akáŋyaŋke-wačhíŋ éyaš khičháŋyaŋ okíhi šni. Wáphiya, thiblóku kiŋ é na atkúku kiŋ khiyéla úŋpi čha iyé é na hunáhomnipi kiŋ nuphíŋ awáŋyaŋkapi okíhipi. Ptáyela ištá tȟózi k’uŋ hé ȟabyápi na thiblóku kiŋ tȟa-húnahomnipi tȟáŋníla kiŋ yutȟéčapi na tȟaŋkšítku yuhákhiyapi.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version? (Arthur Emotion Interactive for Children)

Search the SDLN Library Card Catalog for the books at your library or receive them on loan.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Weekdays, 1:00pm CT
Lakota Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV Ch3, Sundays, 9:00am CT (watch online)

Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher. Printable images of the characters from the program. (Select a character by clicking the picture. The character images should be used if a child cannot read the word mother, father, brother or sister.)

South Dakota Public Broadcasting
Education and Outreach Department
(800) 456-0766 | Edservices@sdpb.org