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Amigos 126 Perro Pepe en la televisiãn (Perro Pepe on Television) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes
By the People, For the People 112 The Federal Presence in South Dakota Filmed entirely on location in South Dakota, this series encourages students to learn about and become involved in government by presenting information about those levels of government closest to "home." Students are afforded a compelling look at school boards, city government, the branches of state government and more. 20-minutes
Club Write 112 Dramatic Writing Teachers Guide

The students write a dramatic adaptation for a well-known children's story.

Club Write provides a comprehensive, contextualized support for developing writing skills at the middle school level. In each program, students are challenged to approach a writing assignment in a different way. 15 minutes
Fun with Espanol 106 Community Teachers Guide

The study of a foreign language in the primary grades encourages acute listening skills,organization, problem solving, and imagination. Exploration and greater understanding of other cultures is an inherent part of foreign language study. This series develops these skills while introducing conversational Spanish to children who have never spoken the language. The format includes familiar settings, simple songs, and easy crafts to help make learning fun. The series is designed so that even teachers without any Spanish language skills can still use it.

Spanish.
(1) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Teacher's Guide Only - No Video) Teacher’s Guide Only - No Video (PDF avaliable lower left)
(Photos)

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen. The production looks at three broad topics: The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains; The Buildings; The Present and Future

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SGLPTG
(A) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Entire Program) Teacher’s Guide – Lower Left (PDF)
(Photos)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen. The production looks at three broad topics: The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains; The Buildings; The Present and Future

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SGLPTG
(B) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Chapter 1 - The Beginning) Teacher’s Guide – Lower Left (PDF)

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA The Beginning - The video visits buildings with some of the earliest stained glass windows in the state, including churches and courthouses. (Photos)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen.

Many communities across the state have used these stained glass windows to tell their stories – their connection to God, the homestead experience or life on the Great Plains. Windows can be found in private homes, churches, courthouse, schools, and even in barns.

The production looks at three broad topics.

The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains
Stained glass windows originally were developed in the Middle East. Early stained glass artists learned to use metals like gold, cobalt, copper and others to create vibrant colors in glass. Centuries later, settlers who immigrated to the Great Plains brought their stained glass traditions with them. In South Dakota, these colorful windows often tell the same stories as windows found in Europe and the Middle East about religion, art and memories.

The Buildings
Churches are most commonly associated with stained glass. Some windows depict biblical figures or stories and some are merely decorative. But not all stained glass is connected to religious communities. Throughout South Dakota there are buildings where stained glass tells stories of our state, individual communities, prominent families, epic events, or sometimes mystical people and places. The State Capitol building is home to many beautiful windows, but the art form is found across the state in schools, courthouses and homes.

The Present and Future
Many of the stained glass windows found across the state are showing the ravages of time. The restoration of a stained glass window is expensive and time consuming, but those who love and respect these beautiful pieces of history are finding ways to restore them. Creating stained glass remains a living art form, and many of today’s artists continue to carry on the storytelling tradition in their contemporary creations. Technology is allowing today’s craftsmen to create more contemporary designs with vivid color choices.

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SGLPTG
(C) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Chapter 2 - What Is Stained Glass) Teacher’s Guide – Lower Left (PDF)

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA What Is Stained Glass - Dr. Barbara Johnson, a South Dakota Humanities Scholar, describes some of the history of how stained glass came to be, both naturally and as an art form. She explains the basic process for creating stained glass. Stained glass was important in churches in the Middle Ages to help relate church teachings to a largely illiterate audience through visual communication. (Photos)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen.

Many communities across the state have used these stained glass windows to tell their stories – their connection to God, the homestead experience or life on the Great Plains. Windows can be found in private homes, churches, courthouse, schools, and even in barns.

The production looks at three broad topics.

The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains
Stained glass windows originally were developed in the Middle East. Early stained glass artists learned to use metals like gold, cobalt, copper and others to create vibrant colors in glass. Centuries later, settlers who immigrated to the Great Plains brought their stained glass traditions with them. In South Dakota, these colorful windows often tell the same stories as windows found in Europe and the Middle East about religion, art and memories.

The Buildings
Churches are most commonly associated with stained glass. Some windows depict biblical figures or stories and some are merely decorative. But not all stained glass is connected to religious communities. Throughout South Dakota there are buildings where stained glass tells stories of our state, individual communities, prominent families, epic events, or sometimes mystical people and places. The State Capitol building is home to many beautiful windows, but the art form is found across the state in schools, courthouses and homes.

The Present and Future
Many of the stained glass windows found across the state are showing the ravages of time. The restoration of a stained glass window is expensive and time consuming, but those who love and respect these beautiful pieces of history are finding ways to restore them. Creating stained glass remains a living art form, and many of today’s artists continue to carry on the storytelling tradition in their contemporary creations. Technology is allowing today’s craftsmen to create more contemporary designs with vivid color choices.

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SGLPTG
(D) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Chapter 3 - The Story Behind the Story Teller) Teacher’s Guide – Lower Left (PDF)

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA The Story Behind the Story Teller - Dr. Johnson relates how she researches stained glass windows in South Dakota and how she has learned about their history as well as the history of the people who purchased or created them. (Photos)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen.

Many communities across the state have used these stained glass windows to tell their stories – their connection to God, the homestead experience or life on the Great Plains. Windows can be found in private homes, churches, courthouse, schools, and even in barns.

The production looks at three broad topics.

The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains
Stained glass windows originally were developed in the Middle East. Early stained glass artists learned to use metals like gold, cobalt, copper and others to create vibrant colors in glass. Centuries later, settlers who immigrated to the Great Plains brought their stained glass traditions with them. In South Dakota, these colorful windows often tell the same stories as windows found in Europe and the Middle East about religion, art and memories.

The Buildings
Churches are most commonly associated with stained glass. Some windows depict biblical figures or stories and some are merely decorative. But not all stained glass is connected to religious communities. Throughout South Dakota there are buildings where stained glass tells stories of our state, individual communities, prominent families, epic events, or sometimes mystical people and places. The State Capitol building is home to many beautiful windows, but the art form is found across the state in schools, courthouses and homes.

The Present and Future
Many of the stained glass windows found across the state are showing the ravages of time. The restoration of a stained glass window is expensive and time consuming, but those who love and respect these beautiful pieces of history are finding ways to restore them. Creating stained glass remains a living art form, and many of today’s artists continue to carry on the storytelling tradition in their contemporary creations. Technology is allowing today’s craftsmen to create more contemporary designs with vivid color choices.

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SGLPTG
(E) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Chapter 4 - Native American Culture) Teacher’s Guide – Lower Left (PDF)

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA Native American Culture - The video reports on stained glass windows in South Dakota Indian reservations that relate Lakota spirituality. (Photos)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen.

Many communities across the state have used these stained glass windows to tell their stories – their connection to God, the homestead experience or life on the Great Plains. Windows can be found in private homes, churches, courthouse, schools, and even in barns.

The production looks at three broad topics.

The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains
Stained glass windows originally were developed in the Middle East. Early stained glass artists learned to use metals like gold, cobalt, copper and others to create vibrant colors in glass. Centuries later, settlers who immigrated to the Great Plains brought their stained glass traditions with them. In South Dakota, these colorful windows often tell the same stories as windows found in Europe and the Middle East about religion, art and memories.

The Buildings
Churches are most commonly associated with stained glass. Some windows depict biblical figures or stories and some are merely decorative. But not all stained glass is connected to religious communities. Throughout South Dakota there are buildings where stained glass tells stories of our state, individual communities, prominent families, epic events, or sometimes mystical people and places. The State Capitol building is home to many beautiful windows, but the art form is found across the state in schools, courthouses and homes.

The Present and Future
Many of the stained glass windows found across the state are showing the ravages of time. The restoration of a stained glass window is expensive and time consuming, but those who love and respect these beautiful pieces of history are finding ways to restore them. Creating stained glass remains a living art form, and many of today’s artists continue to carry on the storytelling tradition in their contemporary creations. Technology is allowing today’s craftsmen to create more contemporary designs with vivid color choices.

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SGLPTG
(F) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Chapter 5 - Reading the Windows) Teacher’s Guide – Lower Left (PDF)

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA Reading the Windows - The video visits Pierre and examines stained glass windows in the State Capitol as well as churches, considering the different ways that the windows tell stories, including their use of color. (Photos)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen.

Many communities across the state have used these stained glass windows to tell their stories – their connection to God, the homestead experience or life on the Great Plains. Windows can be found in private homes, churches, courthouse, schools, and even in barns.

The production looks at three broad topics.

The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains
Stained glass windows originally were developed in the Middle East. Early stained glass artists learned to use metals like gold, cobalt, copper and others to create vibrant colors in glass. Centuries later, settlers who immigrated to the Great Plains brought their stained glass traditions with them. In South Dakota, these colorful windows often tell the same stories as windows found in Europe and the Middle East about religion, art and memories.

The Buildings
Churches are most commonly associated with stained glass. Some windows depict biblical figures or stories and some are merely decorative. But not all stained glass is connected to religious communities. Throughout South Dakota there are buildings where stained glass tells stories of our state, individual communities, prominent families, epic events, or sometimes mystical people and places. The State Capitol building is home to many beautiful windows, but the art form is found across the state in schools, courthouses and homes.

The Present and Future
Many of the stained glass windows found across the state are showing the ravages of time. The restoration of a stained glass window is expensive and time consuming, but those who love and respect these beautiful pieces of history are finding ways to restore them. Creating stained glass remains a living art form, and many of today’s artists continue to carry on the storytelling tradition in their contemporary creations. Technology is allowing today’s craftsmen to create more contemporary designs with vivid color choices.

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SGLPTG
(G) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Chapter 6 - The Importance of Color) Teacher’s Guide – Lower Left (PDF)

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA The Importance of Color - The various meanings of colors in stained glass as well as the ways of producing color are explained. St. Anthony’s Church in Hoven has windows in the Munich Pictorial Style. The church is also an example of how local citizens used stained glass to promote local values. In depicting a Biblical story about Joseph, the father of Jesus, the early German settlers revised the story to emphasize German values. The stained glass windows of the VA Hospital in Hot Springs depict the values of the institution in the caring for wounded soldiers. (Photos)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen.

Many communities across the state have used these stained glass windows to tell their stories – their connection to God, the homestead experience or life on the Great Plains. Windows can be found in private homes, churches, courthouse, schools, and even in barns.

The production looks at three broad topics.

The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains
Stained glass windows originally were developed in the Middle East. Early stained glass artists learned to use metals like gold, cobalt, copper and others to create vibrant colors in glass. Centuries later, settlers who immigrated to the Great Plains brought their stained glass traditions with them. In South Dakota, these colorful windows often tell the same stories as windows found in Europe and the Middle East about religion, art and memories.

The Buildings
Churches are most commonly associated with stained glass. Some windows depict biblical figures or stories and some are merely decorative. But not all stained glass is connected to religious communities. Throughout South Dakota there are buildings where stained glass tells stories of our state, individual communities, prominent families, epic events, or sometimes mystical people and places. The State Capitol building is home to many beautiful windows, but the art form is found across the state in schools, courthouses and homes.

The Present and Future
Many of the stained glass windows found across the state are showing the ravages of time. The restoration of a stained glass window is expensive and time consuming, but those who love and respect these beautiful pieces of history are finding ways to restore them. Creating stained glass remains a living art form, and many of today’s artists continue to carry on the storytelling tradition in their contemporary creations. Technology is allowing today’s craftsmen to create more contemporary designs with vivid color choices.

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SGLPTG
(H) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Chapter 7 - Stained Glass in Our Homes) Teacher’s Guide – Lower Left (PDF)

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA Stained Glass in Our Homes - The video also visits two private homes with stained glass windows, noting that they can have more personal meanings as well. (Photos)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen.

Many communities across the state have used these stained glass windows to tell their stories – their connection to God, the homestead experience or life on the Great Plains. Windows can be found in private homes, churches, courthouse, schools, and even in barns.

The production looks at three broad topics.

The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains
Stained glass windows originally were developed in the Middle East. Early stained glass artists learned to use metals like gold, cobalt, copper and others to create vibrant colors in glass. Centuries later, settlers who immigrated to the Great Plains brought their stained glass traditions with them. In South Dakota, these colorful windows often tell the same stories as windows found in Europe and the Middle East about religion, art and memories.

The Buildings
Churches are most commonly associated with stained glass. Some windows depict biblical figures or stories and some are merely decorative. But not all stained glass is connected to religious communities. Throughout South Dakota there are buildings where stained glass tells stories of our state, individual communities, prominent families, epic events, or sometimes mystical people and places. The State Capitol building is home to many beautiful windows, but the art form is found across the state in schools, courthouses and homes.

The Present and Future
Many of the stained glass windows found across the state are showing the ravages of time. The restoration of a stained glass window is expensive and time consuming, but those who love and respect these beautiful pieces of history are finding ways to restore them. Creating stained glass remains a living art form, and many of today’s artists continue to carry on the storytelling tradition in their contemporary creations. Technology is allowing today’s craftsmen to create more contemporary designs with vivid color choices.

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SGLPTG
(I) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Chapter 8 - The Wild West) Teacher’s Guide – Lower Left (PDF)

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA The Wild West - The video visits Deadwood, where several stained glass windows from a now demolished historic church have been reused in newer buildings. Other windows rescued from old buildings are also seen. (Photos)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen.

Many communities across the state have used these stained glass windows to tell their stories – their connection to God, the homestead experience or life on the Great Plains. Windows can be found in private homes, churches, courthouse, schools, and even in barns.

The production looks at three broad topics.

The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains
Stained glass windows originally were developed in the Middle East. Early stained glass artists learned to use metals like gold, cobalt, copper and others to create vibrant colors in glass. Centuries later, settlers who immigrated to the Great Plains brought their stained glass traditions with them. In South Dakota, these colorful windows often tell the same stories as windows found in Europe and the Middle East about religion, art and memories.

The Buildings
Churches are most commonly associated with stained glass. Some windows depict biblical figures or stories and some are merely decorative. But not all stained glass is connected to religious communities. Throughout South Dakota there are buildings where stained glass tells stories of our state, individual communities, prominent families, epic events, or sometimes mystical people and places. The State Capitol building is home to many beautiful windows, but the art form is found across the state in schools, courthouses and homes.

The Present and Future
Many of the stained glass windows found across the state are showing the ravages of time. The restoration of a stained glass window is expensive and time consuming, but those who love and respect these beautiful pieces of history are finding ways to restore them. Creating stained glass remains a living art form, and many of today’s artists continue to carry on the storytelling tradition in their contemporary creations. Technology is allowing today’s craftsmen to create more contemporary designs with vivid color choices.

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SGLPTG
(J) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Chapter 9 - Protecting Stained Glass) Teacher’s Guide – Lower Left (PDF)

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA Protecting Stained Glass - A visit to a closed church in Zell raises the issue of preserving stained glass windows, which can be impossible to replace, and the importance of documenting and studying windows. The video also visits churches in Aberdeen, Sisseton, and Blue Cloud Abbey, in Marvin. (Photos)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen.

Many communities across the state have used these stained glass windows to tell their stories – their connection to God, the homestead experience or life on the Great Plains. Windows can be found in private homes, churches, courthouse, schools, and even in barns.

The production looks at three broad topics.

The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains
Stained glass windows originally were developed in the Middle East. Early stained glass artists learned to use metals like gold, cobalt, copper and others to create vibrant colors in glass. Centuries later, settlers who immigrated to the Great Plains brought their stained glass traditions with them. In South Dakota, these colorful windows often tell the same stories as windows found in Europe and the Middle East about religion, art and memories.

The Buildings
Churches are most commonly associated with stained glass. Some windows depict biblical figures or stories and some are merely decorative. But not all stained glass is connected to religious communities. Throughout South Dakota there are buildings where stained glass tells stories of our state, individual communities, prominent families, epic events, or sometimes mystical people and places. The State Capitol building is home to many beautiful windows, but the art form is found across the state in schools, courthouses and homes.

The Present and Future
Many of the stained glass windows found across the state are showing the ravages of time. The restoration of a stained glass window is expensive and time consuming, but those who love and respect these beautiful pieces of history are finding ways to restore them. Creating stained glass remains a living art form, and many of today’s artists continue to carry on the storytelling tradition in their contemporary creations. Technology is allowing today’s craftsmen to create more contemporary designs with vivid color choices.

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SGLPTG
(K) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Chapter 10 - Salvation to Forgiveness) Teacher’s Guide – Lower Left (PDF)

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA Salvation to Forgiveness - The state penitentiary in Sioux Falls features stained glass windows made by a prisoner. (Photos)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen.

Many communities across the state have used these stained glass windows to tell their stories – their connection to God, the homestead experience or life on the Great Plains. Windows can be found in private homes, churches, courthouse, schools, and even in barns.

The production looks at three broad topics.

The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains
Stained glass windows originally were developed in the Middle East. Early stained glass artists learned to use metals like gold, cobalt, copper and others to create vibrant colors in glass. Centuries later, settlers who immigrated to the Great Plains brought their stained glass traditions with them. In South Dakota, these colorful windows often tell the same stories as windows found in Europe and the Middle East about religion, art and memories.

The Buildings
Churches are most commonly associated with stained glass. Some windows depict biblical figures or stories and some are merely decorative. But not all stained glass is connected to religious communities. Throughout South Dakota there are buildings where stained glass tells stories of our state, individual communities, prominent families, epic events, or sometimes mystical people and places. The State Capitol building is home to many beautiful windows, but the art form is found across the state in schools, courthouses and homes.

The Present and Future
Many of the stained glass windows found across the state are showing the ravages of time. The restoration of a stained glass window is expensive and time consuming, but those who love and respect these beautiful pieces of history are finding ways to restore them. Creating stained glass remains a living art form, and many of today’s artists continue to carry on the storytelling tradition in their contemporary creations. Technology is allowing today’s craftsmen to create more contemporary designs with vivid color choices.

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SGLPTG
(L) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Chapter 11 - Historic to Present) Teacher’s Guide – Lower Left (PDF)

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA Historic to Present - Sioux Falls is home to many buildings with stained glass windows, including some by noted artist Louis Comfort Tiffany. Dakota Stained Glass in Sioux Falls restores and preserves stained glass windows. (Photos)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen.

Many communities across the state have used these stained glass windows to tell their stories – their connection to God, the homestead experience or life on the Great Plains. Windows can be found in private homes, churches, courthouse, schools, and even in barns.

The production looks at three broad topics.

The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains
Stained glass windows originally were developed in the Middle East. Early stained glass artists learned to use metals like gold, cobalt, copper and others to create vibrant colors in glass. Centuries later, settlers who immigrated to the Great Plains brought their stained glass traditions with them. In South Dakota, these colorful windows often tell the same stories as windows found in Europe and the Middle East about religion, art and memories.

The Buildings
Churches are most commonly associated with stained glass. Some windows depict biblical figures or stories and some are merely decorative. But not all stained glass is connected to religious communities. Throughout South Dakota there are buildings where stained glass tells stories of our state, individual communities, prominent families, epic events, or sometimes mystical people and places. The State Capitol building is home to many beautiful windows, but the art form is found across the state in schools, courthouses and homes.

The Present and Future
Many of the stained glass windows found across the state are showing the ravages of time. The restoration of a stained glass window is expensive and time consuming, but those who love and respect these beautiful pieces of history are finding ways to restore them. Creating stained glass remains a living art form, and many of today’s artists continue to carry on the storytelling tradition in their contemporary creations. Technology is allowing today’s craftsmen to create more contemporary designs with vivid color choices.

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SGLPTG
(M) LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA (Chapter 12 - Preserving History) Teacher’s Guide – Lower Left (PDF)

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: STAINED GLASS IN SOUTH DAKOTA Preserving History - After a few summary comments, a final montage shows images of stained glass windows from all the buildings visited in the video. (Photos)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

In LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE Stained Glass in South Dakota, South Dakota Public Broadcasting Television explores the state’s artistic history. The one-hour SDPB Television production travels throughout the state to look at a beautiful and often underappreciated aspect of South Dakota’s history. The documentary touches on the history and culture of stained glass windows with expert and Humanities Scholar Dr. Barbara Johnson of Aberdeen.

Many communities across the state have used these stained glass windows to tell their stories – their connection to God, the homestead experience or life on the Great Plains. Windows can be found in private homes, churches, courthouse, schools, and even in barns.

The production looks at three broad topics.

The History of Stained Glass on the Great Plains
Stained glass windows originally were developed in the Middle East. Early stained glass artists learned to use metals like gold, cobalt, copper and others to create vibrant colors in glass. Centuries later, settlers who immigrated to the Great Plains brought their stained glass traditions with them. In South Dakota, these colorful windows often tell the same stories as windows found in Europe and the Middle East about religion, art and memories.

The Buildings
Churches are most commonly associated with stained glass. Some windows depict biblical figures or stories and some are merely decorative. But not all stained glass is connected to religious communities. Throughout South Dakota there are buildings where stained glass tells stories of our state, individual communities, prominent families, epic events, or sometimes mystical people and places. The State Capitol building is home to many beautiful windows, but the art form is found across the state in schools, courthouses and homes.

The Present and Future
Many of the stained glass windows found across the state are showing the ravages of time. The restoration of a stained glass window is expensive and time consuming, but those who love and respect these beautiful pieces of history are finding ways to restore them. Creating stained glass remains a living art form, and many of today’s artists continue to carry on the storytelling tradition in their contemporary creations. Technology is allowing today’s craftsmen to create more contemporary designs with vivid color choices.

LIGHT OF THE PRAIRIE: Stained Glass in South Dakota is produced with the support of the South Dakota Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SGLPTG
100 Years, 100 Yards Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%. (High Resolution Video)

Century of High School Football in South Dakota. This SDPB Television documentary looks at High School Football in South Dakota from 1906 to 2006.
A. Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing - Intro Video Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing is a multi-part video series featuring South Dakota artist Dick Termes teaching basic drawing techniques. Resources available for the project are described in the following Teaching and User’s Guide and are available at PBS Learning Media. The series includes more than five hours of content in 20 individual videos (Preview), activities, a teacher’s guide and lesson plans that could be integrated into classrooms of all kinds or for use at home.

Acid Rain Activity

“Protecting the Environment Means Protecting Yourself.” You can be a scientist today, making our world a better place to live tomorrow. Go online and explore ecosystems, see first-hand the effect pollution has on ecosystems and develop your own method of reducing pollution.

Try This At Home or at School

Acid rain is a major pollution problem found in many regions of the United States. Acid rain occurs when chemicals enter the atmosphere and react with water and oxygen. The acid produced falls to the earth causing damage to plants, animals and man-made structures.

You can see the effects of acid rain on plants by conducting the following experiment.

Collect it:
• 4 plastic cups
• dirt / potting soil
• water
• nail
• seeds
• vinegar
• spray bottle

Do it:
1. An adult should help you with the experiment.
2. Poke 3 small holes in each cup using a nail.
3. Fill four small cups with dirt.
4. Plant 4-6 wild flower seeds in each cup. (spread evenly)
5. Water plants. (keep moist, not saturated)
6. Continue to water and care for plants until 2-3 inches of foliage is present.

Experiment:
1. Fill a small spray bottle with vinegar/water. (eye protection)
2. Continue to water and care for plants.
3. Spray foliage 2 times a day with the vinegar (acid) mixture.
4. Continue until plants show visible signs of damage.

Results:
You should notice visible signs of wilting and browning after you spray the foliage. The plants will continue to brown and droop while they slowly die. After you have conducted the experiment the fun does not have to end. Use the list below to choose a category that represents your data. Encourage your friends to try the experiment too and compare your results with theirs.

Acid rain devastation seen in:
• less than 2 days
• 2 - 5 days
• more than 5 days
Amazing Body Tour: #101 - The Lunchroom **NOTE: Amazing Body Tour Implementation Guide (PDF) – Lower Left **
The Amazing Body Tour, funded by TEAM Nutrition , is a unique educational program designed to involve kindergarten through fifth grade students in learning the skills and choices for a healthy lifestyle.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

Non-commercial, Educational Use Only. This Site and the Content therein may be used for non-commercial educational purposes only. You may not change, alter, reproduce, modify, create derivative works of, distribute, or commercially exploit, in whole or in part, the Content of this Site.


ABT
Amazing Body Tour: #102 – The Brain **NOTE: Amazing Body Tour Implementation Guide (PDF) – Lower Left **
The Amazing Body Tour, funded by TEAM Nutrition , is a unique educational program designed to involve kindergarten through fifth grade students in learning the skills and choices for a healthy lifestyle.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

Non-commercial, Educational Use Only. This Site and the Content therein may be used for non-commercial educational purposes only. You may not change, alter, reproduce, modify, create derivative works of, distribute, or commercially exploit, in whole or in part, the Content of this Site.


ABT
Amazing Body Tour: #103 – The Mouth **NOTE: Amazing Body Tour Implementation Guide (PDF) – Lower Left **
The Amazing Body Tour, funded by TEAM Nutrition , is a unique educational program designed to involve kindergarten through fifth grade students in learning the skills and choices for a healthy lifestyle.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

Non-commercial, Educational Use Only. This Site and the Content therein may be used for non-commercial educational purposes only. You may not change, alter, reproduce, modify, create derivative works of, distribute, or commercially exploit, in whole or in part, the Content of this Site.


ABT
Amazing Body Tour: #104 – The Stomach **NOTE: Amazing Body Tour Implementation Guide (PDF) – Lower Left **
The Amazing Body Tour, funded by TEAM Nutrition , is a unique educational program designed to involve kindergarten through fifth grade students in learning the skills and choices for a healthy lifestyle.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

Non-commercial, Educational Use Only. This Site and the Content therein may be used for non-commercial educational purposes only. You may not change, alter, reproduce, modify, create derivative works of, distribute, or commercially exploit, in whole or in part, the Content of this Site.


ABT
Amazing Body Tour: #105 – The Small and Large Intestines **NOTE: Amazing Body Tour Implementation Guide (PDF) – Lower Left **
The Amazing Body Tour, funded by TEAM Nutrition , is a unique educational program designed to involve kindergarten through fifth grade students in learning the skills and choices for a healthy lifestyle.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

Non-commercial, Educational Use Only. This Site and the Content therein may be used for non-commercial educational purposes only. You may not change, alter, reproduce, modify, create derivative works of, distribute, or commercially exploit, in whole or in part, the Content of this Site.


ABT
Amazing Body Tour: #106 – The Heart **NOTE: Amazing Body Tour Implementation Guide (PDF) – Lower Left **
The Amazing Body Tour, funded by TEAM Nutrition , is a unique educational program designed to involve kindergarten through fifth grade students in learning the skills and choices for a healthy lifestyle.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

Non-commercial, Educational Use Only. This Site and the Content therein may be used for non-commercial educational purposes only. You may not change, alter, reproduce, modify, create derivative works of, distribute, or commercially exploit, in whole or in part, the Content of this Site.


ABT
Amazing Body Tour: #107 – The Lungs **NOTE: Amazing Body Tour Implementation Guide (PDF) – Lower Left **
The Amazing Body Tour, funded by TEAM Nutrition , is a unique educational program designed to involve kindergarten through fifth grade students in learning the skills and choices for a healthy lifestyle.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

Non-commercial, Educational Use Only. This Site and the Content therein may be used for non-commercial educational purposes only. You may not change, alter, reproduce, modify, create derivative works of, distribute, or commercially exploit, in whole or in part, the Content of this Site.


ABT
Amazing Body Tour: #108 – The Bones **NOTE: Amazing Body Tour Implementation Guide (PDF) – Lower Left **
The Amazing Body Tour, funded by TEAM Nutrition , is a unique educational program designed to involve kindergarten through fifth grade students in learning the skills and choices for a healthy lifestyle.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

Non-commercial, Educational Use Only. This Site and the Content therein may be used for non-commercial educational purposes only. You may not change, alter, reproduce, modify, create derivative works of, distribute, or commercially exploit, in whole or in part, the Content of this Site.


ABT
Amazing Body Tour: #109 – The Muscles **NOTE: Amazing Body Tour Implementation Guide (PDF) – Lower Left **
The Amazing Body Tour, funded by TEAM Nutrition , is a unique educational program designed to involve kindergarten through fifth grade students in learning the skills and choices for a healthy lifestyle.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

Non-commercial, Educational Use Only. This Site and the Content therein may be used for non-commercial educational purposes only. You may not change, alter, reproduce, modify, create derivative works of, distribute, or commercially exploit, in whole or in part, the Content of this Site.


ABT
Amazing Body Tour: #110 – The Skin **NOTE: Amazing Body Tour Implementation Guide (PDF) – Lower Left **
The Amazing Body Tour, funded by TEAM Nutrition , is a unique educational program designed to involve kindergarten through fifth grade students in learning the skills and choices for a healthy lifestyle.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

Non-commercial, Educational Use Only. This Site and the Content therein may be used for non-commercial educational purposes only. You may not change, alter, reproduce, modify, create derivative works of, distribute, or commercially exploit, in whole or in part, the Content of this Site.


ABT
Amazing Body Tour: #111 – The Pathway **NOTE: Amazing Body Tour Implementation Guide (PDF) – Lower Left **
The Amazing Body Tour, funded by TEAM Nutrition , is a unique educational program designed to involve kindergarten through fifth grade students in learning the skills and choices for a healthy lifestyle.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

Non-commercial, Educational Use Only. This Site and the Content therein may be used for non-commercial educational purposes only. You may not change, alter, reproduce, modify, create derivative works of, distribute, or commercially exploit, in whole or in part, the Content of this Site.


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AMERICAN ACE: THE JOE FOSS STORY Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

AMERICAN ACE: THE JOE FOSS STORY (Study Guide, Facts & More): Joe Foss - World War II ace, Medal of Honor winner, governor, football commissioner, TV show host, business executive - is one of South Dakota’s most famous sons. His story is the focus of AMERICAN ACE: THE JOE FOSS STORY, a production of South Dakota Public Television. Foss, born to a South Dakota farm family in 1915, fell in love with airplanes as a boy. After his father died, this young man, still in his teens, put his dreams away to keep the family farm running. When his younger brother took over, he went on to college and learned to fly. He joined the Marines, and earned his wings at age 26, but was told he was too old to be a fighter pilot. But Foss persevered, getting his chance just months after Pearl Harbor. Foss proved himself over Guadalcanal. In just six weeks, he shot down 23 Japanese planes. A couple of months later, he added three more. He earned international fame and the Medal of Honor. After the war, he returned to South Dakota, starting a business, running for office and becoming Governor in 1955. His next claim to fame was as the first Commissioner of the American Football League. He went on to host two popular sports shows for television, excel as a business executive and support many charities and organizations.

Amigos 101 Perro Pepe encuentra su casa (Perro Pepe Finds a Home) Perro Pepe encuentra su casa (Perro Pepe Finds a Home)

Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more.
Amigos 102 Perro Pepe tiene seis aÀos (Perro Pepe is Six Years Old) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes
Amigos 103 Perro Pepe es un perro (Perro Pepe Is a Dog) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes
Amigos 104 Fernöndez's Funky Fonda: la gran inauguraciãn (The Grand Opening) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes
Amigos 105 El gran secreto de Perro Pepe (Perro Pepe's Big Secret) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes
Amigos 106 El cumpleanos de Perro Pepe (Perro Pepe's Birthday) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes
Amigos 107 La caperucita roja (Little Red Riding Hood) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes
Amigos 108 El sueÀo de Perro Pepe (Perro Pepe's Dream) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes
Amigos 109 El regalo de Lu (Lu's Gift) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes
Amigos 110 La escuela de Perro Pepe (Perro Pepe's School) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes
Amigos 111 Mark va a la escuela? (Is Mark Going to School?) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes
Amigos 112 La seÀorita y su perro (The Lady and Her Dog) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes
Amigos 113 Vamos al cine (Let's Go to the Movies) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes
Amigos 114 Las flores (The Flowers) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes
Amigos 115 Lunes de tormenta (Stormy Monday) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes

Amigos 116 Los colores de Miriam (Miriam's Colors) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes

Amigos 117 Ir o no ir (To Go or Not to Go) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes
Amigos 118 Buen viaje, SeÀorita Fernöndez (Good Trip, SeÀorita Fernöndez) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes
Amigos 119 En cual direcciãn doblar? (Which W ay to Turn?) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes
Amigos 120 Es magia (It's Magic) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes
Amigos 121 El problema de Miriam (Miriam's Problem) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes
Amigos 122 Ir de compras (Going Shopping) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes
Amigos 123 Mi casa es su casa (My House Is Your House) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes
Amigos 124 Dãnde estö el perro? (Where Is the Dog?) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes
Amigos 125 El cocinero (The Chef) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes
Amigos 127 A Perro Pepe le duele un diente (Perro Pepe Has a Toothache) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes
Amigos 128 Las formas (The Shapes) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes
Amigos 129 La reuniãn (The Reunion) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes
Amigos 130 Mi hogar, dulce hogar (Home Sweet Home) Encourage young students to learn basic Spanish vocabulary and increase their awareness and appreciation of Hispanic culture. Develop interest in the geography of Spanish-speaking countries and reinforce skills and concepts taught in the regular language arts curriculum. Amigos uses the FLEX (Foreign Language Experience) approach, which emphasizes oral practice within real-life situations. Students hear and repeat Spanish words and phrases relating to numbers, colors, food, family members, animals, clothing, and much more. 15 Minutes


Amphibians & Reptiles (Activities Only, PDF Lower Left) (Activities Only, PDF Lower Left)

Amphibian & reptile resources for classroom and home use, including activity ideas, video, guidebooks and more.
Animal Life and Beyond 101 Birds Survey the animal kingdom and encourage students to revel in the infinite intelligence of evolution. By illustrating different animals' means of adapting, the series conveys the rich variety of alternatives to extinction.

This episode looks at the theory of the development of birds from reptiles. The program reveals the spectrum of birds-from hummingbirds to hawks to penguins-while examining birds' similarities to and differences from other life-forms. 15-minute episode
Animal Life and Beyond 102 The Food Chain Survey the animal kingdom and encourage students to revel in the infinite intelligence of evolution. By illustrating different animals' means of adapting, the series conveys the rich variety of alternatives to extinction.

This episode reveals the interrelationships between plant life, herbivores, carnivores, omnivores, and scavengers. The program suggests the association between size and numbers of organisms in relation to their position in the food chain. 15-minute episodes
Animal Life and Beyond 103 Heat and Living Beings Survey the animal kingdom and encourage students to revel in the infinite intelligence of evolution. By illustrating different animals' means of adapting, the series conveys the rich variety of alternatives to extinction.

This episode uncovers the temperature needs and preferences of varied organisms while exploring the ways different plants and animals have adapted to heat and cold. Displays the instinctive animal behavior related to temperature. 15-minute episode
Animal Life and Beyond 104 Mammals, Part 1 Survey the animal kingdom and encourage students to revel in the infinite intelligence of evolution. By illustrating different animals' means of adapting, the series conveys the rich variety of alternatives to extinction.

This episode depicts the origins and the variety of mammalian life. The process of human development is compared to that of other mammals. The mouth and tooth structure of a variety of mammals is compared and contrasted. 15-minute episodes
Animal Life and Beyond 105 Mammals, Part 2 Survey the animal kingdom and encourage students to revel in the infinite intelligence of evolution. By illustrating different animals' means of adapting, the series conveys the rich variety of alternatives to extinction.

This episode reveals more specifics about the myriad varieties of mammals and the scope of mammalian development-from the duckbilled platypus to the human. Contrasts the sizes and capabilities of mammals. 15-minute episodes
Animal Life and Beyond 106 Marine Life Survey the animal kingdom and encourage students to revel in the infinite intelligence of evolution. By illustrating different animals' means of adapting, the series conveys the rich variety of alternatives to extinction.

Marine Life This episode explains why life began in the seas and displays the abundance of life that still prospers there. Students will discover the organisms residing in the two principal ocean zones and become aware of the results of pollution in waterways. 15-minute episodes
Animal Life and Beyond 107 Microscopic Life Forms Survey the animal kingdom and encourage students to revel in the infinite intelligence of evolution. By illustrating different animals' means of adapting, the series conveys the rich variety of alternatives to extinction.

Microscopic Life Forms This episode reveals the tremendous variety of protista, fungi, and monera, as well as their importance to life on the planet. Students will discover the importance of protozoa and bacteria that eat decomposing matter, as well as uses for yeasts and algae. 15-minute episodes
Animal Life and Beyond 108 Reptiles Survey the animal kingdom and encourage students to revel in the infinite intelligence of evolution. By illustrating different animals' means of adapting, the series conveys the rich variety of alternatives to extinction.

This episode establishes why reptiles live in warm temperate climates, illuminating their actions and survival mechanisms. Demonstrates dramatic variations among some reptiles' sense organs. 15-minute episodes
B. Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing - About the Artist Video - About Artist Dick Termes (Matter of Perspective - Dick Termes on Dakota Life): Dick describes the 6-point perspective that helps him produce the Termespheres.

Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing is a multi-part video series featuring South Dakota artist Dick Termes teaching basic drawing techniques. Resources available for the project are described in the following Teaching and User’s Guide and are available at PBS Learning Media. The series includes more than five hours of content in 20 individual videos (Preview), activities, a teacher’s guide and lesson plans that could be integrated into classrooms of all kinds or for use at home
Badlands National Park: Kylie's Fossil Find *Teacher Resources: PowerPoint & Lesson Plan
*Additional Lesson Plans/Teacher Resources
*Curriculum Materials
*Badlands Photostream
*SDPB - The Badlands: Nature's Time Capsule (Documentary)

In May 2010, a seven year girl named Kylie found a fossil near the visitor center at Badlands National Park. She did the right thing. She reported her find to rangers. It turned out to be an exceptionally rare and well-preserved saber tooth cat fossil.

As your students learn about fossils, this nonfiction story will help them understand the science of paleontology and the importance of protecting our natural resources. Furthermore, they may be able to better identify with the real life story of another young student.

(Badlands, National Park, junior ranger programs, Kylie Ferguson, fossil, ranger, fossilized bone, Paleontologists, saber tooth cat skull, hard rock called limestone, dig, Hoplophoneus (HOP-LOW-PHONE-EE-US), erosion, buried, butte, fragmented, rare, protect, excavate, lab, specimen, museum)
Badlands National Park: Secrets of the Past *Secrets of the Past Lesson Plan
*Lesson Plans/Teacher Resources
*Curriculum Materials
*Geology of the Badlands
*Badlands Photostream
*SDPB - The Badlands: Nature's Time Capsule (Documentary)

Secrets of the Past: An Introductory Lesson (Badlands Earth History, Grades K-8)

Students watch a six minute ranger video about the Badlands. Students create a “flipbook” by arranging the Badlands rock layer pages, ancient depositional environments, and fossilized animals in chronological order. Students gain an understanding and appreciation of Badlands Earth history by completing this lesson. Students will be able to describe how the Badlands rock layers were deposited over time by ancient environments. Students will match ancient environments and fossilized animals to the corrolating rock layer/time period in Earth’s history. Students will be able to describe how the modern processes of weathering and erosion shape the Badlands.

National Science Standards
K-4: Earth and Space Science: Content Standard D: As a result of their activities in grades K-4, all students should develop an understanding of properties of earth materials and changes in earth and sky.
5-8: Earth and Space Science: Content Standard D: As a result of their activities in grades 5-8, all students should develop an understanding of structure of the earth system and Earth’s history.

South Dakota Science Standards
K.E.1.1; 1.E.1.2; 2.E.1.2; 3.L.3.4; 4.L.2.1; 5.L.3.1; 6.E.1.3; 7.L.3.1; 8.E.1.5
Bernoulli's (air) Tube Demonstration Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(Bonus Video/ Lesson Plans) This classic science demonstration shows both Bernoulli's Principle and resonance. A corrugated tube is twirled producing sound. Air moves from an area of high pressure to an area of low pressure.

Bernoulli's (air) Tube Demonstration (Bonus Video) Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(Lesson Video/ Lesson Plans) This classic science demonstration shows both Bernoulli's Principle and resonance. A corrugated tube is twirled producing sound. Air moves from an area of high pressure to an area of low pressure.

Bernoulli's Bag Demonstration Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(Lesson Plans) This classic science demonstration shows Bernoulli's Principle. A moving stream of air produces an area of low pressure (vacuum.) Air moves from high pressure to low pressure.



Bernoulli's Ball Demonstration Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(Bonus Video/ Lesson Plans) This is a twist of the classic Ping-Pong ball/hairdryer demonstration used to show Bernoulli's Principle. A leaf blower replaces the hairdryer and a beach ball replaces the Ping-Pong ball. This is amazing to watch.

Bernoulli's Ball Demonstration (Bonus Video) Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(Lesson Video/ Lesson Plans) ***Bonus Video***This is a twist of the classic Ping-Pong ball/hairdryer demonstration used to show Bernoulli's Principle. A leaf blower replaces the hairdryer and a beach ball replaces the Ping-Pong ball. This is amazing to watch.

Bernoulli's TP Demonstration Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(Lesson Plans) During this classic science demonstration toilet paper is used to show Bernoulli's Principle. A moving stream of air produces an area of low pressure. Air moves from high pressure to low pressure.


Birds - Ornithology (Activities Only, PDF Lower Left) (Activities Only, PDF Lower Left)

Bird (ornithology) resources for classroom and home use, including activity ideas, video, guidebooks and more.
Booklet - Approaches to Teaching American Indian Histories and Cultures (From CAIRNS) Approaches to Teaching American Indian Histories and Cultures (From CAIRNS) - Teacher-created overview of tribes and reservations in South Dakota. Includes standards-based classroom activities in K-12 grade levels and various content areas. Color, 123 pages with illustrations and bibliographies. HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops 2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 2: OSEUS2, OSEU2)
(Essential Understanding 3: OSEUS3, OSEU3)
(Essential Understanding 4: OSEUS4, OSEU4)
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6, OSEU6)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
(OSEUS, OSEU)
Bridging the Gap: Native American Education South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards (Introduction)

Bridging the Gap: Native American Education (Website)

Due to cultural differences and socio-economic conditions, the challenges facing Native American students are many. This video/teaching tool offers insight into the problems and possible solutions for educators of Native American young people. running time: 24:14 minutes

Program Synopsis
The program reports on statistics showing that the educational achievement of Native American students in South Dakota is below that of the averages for all South Dakota students. Next, several commentators describe various challenges facing Native American students, including language barriers, cultural differences, poverty, and lack of support at home. Representatives of the South Dakota Department of Education describe some statewide efforts to expand the teaching of the Native American experience across the school curriculum as well as specific educational programs that focus on improving student performance. The program also includes observations by a Native American high school teacher and high school students concerning their educational experiences.

Key Concepts
- In South Dakota, Native American student achievement is below that of all South
Dakota students.
- Native American students face many challenges in their educational experience,
including poverty, language barriers, cultural differences, and lack of home
support.
- The South Dakota government has launched efforts to address the educational
needs of Native American students and to expand the teaching of Native
American culture in schools.
- Many Native Americans believe that greater awareness of Native American
culture by schools would improve the experience and performance of Native
American students.

Program Interviewees
This program reports on the current condition of Native American education through the comments of South Dakota educators and students.

Clifford Canku, Dakota Studies Instructor at Sisseton Wahpeton College at Sisseton
Wahpeton Reservation
Dr. Craig Howe, Graduate Studies Instructor, Oglala Lakota College, Pine Ridge
Reservation, SD
Stella Littlem, Rapid City Central High School Student
Kolette Medicine, Oglala Lakota College Student
Michelle Mehlberg, Department of Education
Dr. Rick Melmer, Secretary, South Dakota Department of Education
Keith Moore, South Dakota Department of Education, Office of Indian Education
Stacy Phelps, Oglala Lakota College
Ione Quigley, Chairperson, Lakota Studies at Sinte Gleska University, Rosebud Sioux
Tribe, SD
Whitney Rencountre II, Black Hills State University Student
Audrey Terkildsen, Rapid City Central High School Student
Albert White Hat, Sr., Professor of Lakota Language at Sinte Gleska University,
Rosebud Sioux Tribe, SD
(OSEUS, OSEUS1, OSEUS2, OSEUS3, OSEUS4, OSEUS5, OSEUS6, OSEUS7)


Buddy's Book Club: A Bully Free School Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

A Bully Free School (SD Library Search) by Pamela Hall, Magic World - It is time for Buddy’s Book Club. Bullies make me very sad… Are you a bully? Have you ever taken the bully test? If you haven’t taken the bully test, then read A Bully Free School and pass the test today!

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: A Tasting Party Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

A Tasting Party (SD Library Search) by Jane Belk-Moncure, Publisher: Child’s World - Hello Buddy Book Club fans! Do you like going to parties like me? I have been to birthday parties, going away parties and even anniversary parties, but I never heard of a tasting party, have you? Read A Tasting Party to find out more!

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Buddy's Book Club: Achoo! Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Achoo! (SD Library Search) by Jo Cleland, Rourke Educational Media - Hello Kids, It is your friend Buddy! I do not like to get sick, do you? You can get people sick by sneezing in your hands… did you know that? Read Achoo! to learn how to sneeze like a pro!

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: Back to School for Rotten Ralph Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Back to School for Rotten Ralph (SD Library Search) by Jack Gantos, Harper Collins - I have some bad news… Rotten Ralph the meanest cat in the world just entered the school… I wonder what will happen next. Read Back to School for Rotten Ralph to see if the school will ever be the same again.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: Bugs for Lunch Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Bugs for Lunch (SD Library Search) by Margery Facklam, Publisher: Charlesbridge - Hello, it is your friend Buddy. Do you like to eat apples, carrots and bugs? Did I just say bugs – eeew! Read Bugs for Lunch to see who eats bugs.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: Captain Flinn and the Pirate Dinosaurs Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Captain Flinn and the Pirate Dinosaurs (SD Library Search) by Giles Andreae, Margaret K. McElderry Books - Hello Buddy here! My friend Flinn just returned from an amazing adventure on a ship with dinosaurs. Did he imagine the whole adventure or did it really happen? See for yourself in the book, Captain Flinn and the Pirate Dinosaurs.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: Cat Secrets Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Cat Secrets (SD Library Search) by Jef Czekaj, Harper Collins - I know a secret that will surprise you… cats can read! Do you believe it? It is true and there are more secrets that cats have, read Cat Secrets it you are curious.
Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: Chu’s Day Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Chu’s Day (SD Library Search) by Neil Gaiman, Bloomsbury - Everything is blowing away, even the bike, a table and an elephant. It feels like a tornado or hurricane… but the sky is clear. You will never guess what or who is causing the wind to blow. Read Chu’s Day for the answer.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: Curious George Visits the Library Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Curious George Visits the Library (SD Library Search) by Margret & H.A. Rey’s, Houghton Miffin Company - Oh no! George just knocked over a cart full of books in the library! I wonder if the librarian will ask him to pick up the books and leave. Read Curious George Visits the Library to find out.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: Farm Flu Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Farm Flu (SD Library Search) by Teresa Bateman, Albert Whitman and Company - What else can go wrong, all of the farm animals are in the house and they are sick too! Will they every get better and how will they get out? Read Farm Flue to find out.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: First Day Jitters Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

First Day Jitters (SD Library Search) by Julie Danneberg, Whispering Coyote - Hello Buddy Here! The first day of school is always scary for me. It is especially scary for Sarah; she does not want to go to school today. Read First Day Jitters to see if Sarah goes to school.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: Goldilocks and the Three Dinosaurs Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Goldilocks and the Three Dinosaurs (SD Library Search) by Mo Willems, Harper Collins - It is time for Buddy’s Book Club! I love this book, Goldilocks and the Three Bea…ah, wait a second, three dinosaurs? What is going on here, Goldilocks and the Three Dinosaurs… you are going to want to read this.

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Buddy's Book Club: Grandpa and Bo Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Grandpa and Bo (SD Library Search) by Kevin Henkes, Green Willow Books - Hey, Buddy here! Do you like spending time with your grandpa like me? Bo gets to spend a whole summer with his grandpa. Wow that would be fun! Read Grandpa and Bo to see what their summer was like.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: How to Babysit a Grandpa Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

How to Babysit a Grandpa (SD Library Search) by Jean Reagan, Alfred A. Knopf Have you ever babysat before? Have you ever babysat for your grandpa? Is that even possible? Read How to Babysit Your Grandpa for the answer.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: I’ll Save You BOBO! Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

I’ll Save You BOBO! (SD Library Search) by Eileen Rosenthal, Atheneum Books for Young Readers - Oh No! My friend Willy’s book is coming to life… there are snakes and tigers everywhere. What will Willy do to stay safe? Read I’ll Save You BOBO! to see if Willy and BOBO escape.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: llama llama time to share Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

llama llama time to share (SD Library Search) by Anna Dewdney, Viking - llama llama is having a bad day… the arm on llama’s doll just got ripped off by another llama; will it ever be the same? Read llama llama time to share if you are curious.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: Messy Bessey’s Garden Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Messy Bessey’s Garden (SD Library Search) by Patricia and Fredrick McKissack, Publisher: Children’s Press - Hello… Buddy here! It is time for Buddy’s Book Club. Halloween is just around the corner, do you know how to take care of pumpkins so they grow really big? If you are curious, then read Messy Bessey’s Garden.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: Mmm, Cookies! Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Mmm, Cookies! (SD Library Search) by Robert Munsch, Scholastic Yuck! Why would Christopher’s mom and dad eat clay? That cannot be good for their teeth. Oh no Christopher did too! There is something really strange going on here. Read Mmm, Cookies to find out why they all ate clay.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: Mouse Went Out to Get a Snack Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Mouse Went Out to Get a Snack (SD Library Search) by Lyn Rossiter McFarland, Publisher: Farrar Straus Giroux - Hello… Buddy here! It is time for Buddy’s Book Club. Wow! A mouse that counts food! Is that even possible? Read the book Mouse Went Out to Get a Snack to see if a mouse can count.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: Paper Scissors Glue Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Paper Scissors Glue (SD Library Search) by Catherine Woram, Ryland Peters and Small - What do you think you get when you combine paper, scissors and glue? Believe it or not you get alligators, birds, dragons and airplanes. Read the book paper scissors and glue to find out how.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: Pirates Don’t Take Baths Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Pirates Don’t Take Baths (SD Library Search) by John Segal, Philomel Books - Ooo… Do you smell that? You’re lucky if you do not. It is my friend, Pig the Pirate. He is visiting me this week and he has not taken a bath for a long time. Read Pirates Don’t Take Baths to see if he takes a bath or if I need to wear a clothespin on my nose.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: Please Play Safe! Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Please Play Safe! (SD Library Search) by Margery Cuyler, Scholastic - The kids are breaking all of the rules on the playground! They are kicking sand in each other’s faces, knocking each other over and budging, what next? Read Please Play Safe if you are curious.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: Quiet Bunny’s Many Colors Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Quiet Bunny’s Many Colors (SD Library Search) by Lisa McCue, Sterling - This is not good; there is a red, blue and green rabbit in the forest. Will the forest ever be the same again? What color should a rabbit be? Get the book Quiet Bunny’s Many Colors for the answer.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: Rock ‘N’ Roll Mole Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Rock ‘N’ Roll Mole (SD Library Search) by Carolyn Crimi, Dial Books for Young Readers - It is time for another Buddy’s Book Club. Mole wants to play the guitar and be a rock ‘n’ roll star… but he is mole. He should be living in the ground and digging holes. Get the book Rock ‘N’ Roll Mole to see if he digs holes or rocks the stage.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: Slat Says Thank You! Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Slat Says Thank You! (SD Library Search) by Rob Scotton, Harper - Do you think it is possible for a mouse and a cat to be best friends… well I don’t. Read Slat Says Thank You! to learn about a special cat and mouse that may surprise you.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: Smarty Pig Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Smarty Pig (SD Library Search) by Molly Nero, Halo Publishing International - Time for Buddy’s book club! Oh No! The school is full of pigs… they are in the classroom, the hallway and the lunchroom. What will happen next? Read Smarty Pig to find out!

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: Stranger in the Woods Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Stranger in the Woods (SD Library Search) by Carl R Sams II and Jean Stoick, Carl R Sams II Photography - All of the animals are very nervous; there is something strange in the woods making them curious. Read Stranger in the Woods to find out who or what it is!

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: The Day Louis Got Eaten Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

The Day Louis Got Eaten (SD Library Search) by Anne Isaacs, Scholastic - There is something weird going on here… Louis was riding his bike through the woods and he got eaten... what next? Only one way to find out, read The Day Louis Got Eaten!

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: The Perfect Nest Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

The Perfect Nest (SD Library Search) by Catherine Friend, Candlewick Press - Have your ever seen a cat put a bird to bed? I haven’t either until now. Read The Perfect Nest if you want to see a really weird cat sitting in a nest taking care of a bird.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: Traffic Safety Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Traffic Safety (SD Library Search) by Nancy Loewen, The Child’s World - Hello it is your friend Buddy. Oh no! There are too many cars; the kids can’t cross the street… They will be late for school. Read Traffic Safety to see if they figure out how to cross the street before it is too late.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: Treasure Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Treasure (SD Library Search) by Suzanne Bloom, Boyds Mills Press - Have you ever gone on a treasure hunt? Bear and Duck have and they found the coolest treasure ever! Read Treasure to find out what Bear and Duck found.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: Water Safety Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Water Safety (SD Library Search) by Nancy Loewen, The Child’s World - It is time for Buddy’s Book Club! Do you like to go to the pool? I do now… but I was a little scared of the water at first. Are you scared of the water? Read Water Safety and you will like the pool just like me!

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: Weather Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Weather (SD Library Search) by Catriona Clarke, Usborne - I love looking at clouds, they are so cool. Have you ever been inside of a cloud? I have… in a special cloud called fog. Do you know how clouds are made? Read Weather to find out.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: Where to, Little Wombat? Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Where to, Little Wombat? (SD Library Search) by Charles Fuge, Sterling Publishing Co. - Welcome to Buddy’s Book Club! Do you know what a wombat does for fun…? I don’t… I am not even sure what a wombat is. Read Where to, Little Wombat if you are curious.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Buddy's Book Club: You are My Wish Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

You are My Wish (SD Library Search) by Maryann Cusimano Love, Philomel Books - Do you like spending time with your grandmother…? So do I! We make cookies, read together and play games. I wonder what other kids do with their grandmothers? Read You are My Wish to see what grandma bears do with their grandbears. 

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Building Connections to the Past 101 History of Construction and Materials Carry students into the lives and perspectives of three distinct early cultures, Egyptian, Incan and Mayan. This episode examines the progression of human shelter, from huts and tents for nomadic hunters through more permanent structures as humankind became more settled. Looks at the varied availability and uses of materials, and concludes with descriptions of the construction of skyscrapers and "intelligent buildings." 15 minutes

Building Connections to the Past 102 Egyptian Culture Carry students into the lives and perspectives of three distinct early cultures, Egyptian, Incan and Mayan. This episode focuses on the ancient Egyptians' search for immortality. Illustrates the incredible precision of the pyramids' construction, and introduces the technique-and mystique-of mummification. 15 minutes
Building Connections to the Past 103 The Incan Empire Carry students into the lives and perspectives of three distinct early cultures, Egyptian, Incan and Mayan. Explores the agricultural strengths of the Incan society-including the effects it had on modern farming-and examines its architectural remnants. The culture is portrayed as intelligent, although illiterate. 15 minutes

Building Connections to the Past 104 The Mayas, Part 1 Carry students into the lives and perspectives of three distinct early cultures, Egyptian, Incan and Mayan. Reviews the history of the human race up through the Mayan civilization. The Mayan culture was important because of its literacy, remarkably accurate astronomy, and methods of recording the passage of time. 15 minutes
Building Connections to the Past 105 The Mayas, Part 2 Carry students into the lives and perspectives of three distinct early cultures, Egyptian, Incan and Mayan. Examines the changes to Mayan culture from invasions by the Toltecs and the Spanish up through the fall of the Mayan civilization. Looks at social activities, such as the ballgame called "pelota," as well as religious customs, which included human sacrifice. 15 minutes

By the People, For the People 101 School Government Filmed entirely on location in South Dakota, this series encourages students to learn about and become involved in government by presenting information about those levels of government closest to "home." Students are afforded a compelling look at school boards, city government, the branches of state government and more. 20-minutes
By the People, For the People 102 City Government Filmed entirely on location in South Dakota, this series encourages students to learn about and become involved in government by presenting information about those levels of government closest to "home." Students are afforded a compelling look at school boards, city government, the branches of state government and more. 20-minutes
By the People, For the People 103 County Government Filmed entirely on location in South Dakota, this series encourages students to learn about and become involved in government by presenting information about those levels of government closest to "home." Students are afforded a compelling look at school boards, city government, the branches of state government and more. 20-minutes

By the People, For the People 104 The Electoral Process Filmed entirely on location in South Dakota, this series encourages students to learn about and become involved in government by presenting information about those levels of government closest to "home." Students are afforded a compelling look at school boards, city government, the branches of state government and more. 20-minutes
By the People, For the People 105 The Legislature Filmed entirely on location in South Dakota, this series encourages students to learn about and become involved in government by presenting information about those levels of government closest to "home." Students are afforded a compelling look at school boards, city government, the branches of state government and more. 20-minutes
By the People, For the People 106 Tribal Government Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

Filmed entirely on location in South Dakota, this series encourages students to learn about and become involved in government by presenting information about those levels of government closest to "home." Students are afforded a compelling look at school boards, city government, the branches of state government and more. 20-minutes

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6, OSEU6)
By the People, For the People 107 The Constitution Filmed entirely on location in South Dakota, this series encourages students to learn about and become involved in government by presenting information about those levels of government closest to "home." Students are afforded a compelling look at school boards, city government, the branches of state government and more. 20-minutes
By the People, For the People 108 Finance & Economic Development Filmed entirely on location in South Dakota, this series encourages students to learn about and become involved in government by presenting information about those levels of government closest to "home." Students are afforded a compelling look at school boards, city government, the branches of state government and more. 20-minutes
By the People, For the People 109 The Governorship Filmed entirely on location in South Dakota, this series encourages students to learn about and become involved in government by presenting information about those levels of government closest to "home." Students are afforded a compelling look at school boards, city government, the branches of state government and more. 20-minutes


By the People, For the People 110 The Courts Filmed entirely on location in South Dakota, this series encourages students to learn about and become involved in government by presenting information about those levels of government closest to "home." Students are afforded a compelling look at school boards, city government, the branches of state government and more. 20-minutes
By the People, For the People 111 State Parks Filmed entirely on location in South Dakota, this series encourages students to learn about and become involved in government by presenting information about those levels of government closest to "home." Students are afforded a compelling look at school boards, city government, the branches of state government and more. 20-minutes
C. Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing - Cube Basic Video - Cube Basic: Artist Dick Termes introduces cubes and how to draw them in space with an artistic angle so that you can see dimensions. An animated video shows many examples of cubes in the real world.

Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing is a multi-part video series featuring South Dakota artist Dick Termes teaching basic drawing techniques. Resources available for the project are described in the following Teaching and User’s Guide and are available at PBS Learning Media. The series includes more than five hours of content in 20 individual videos (Preview), activities, a teacher’s guide and lesson plans that could be integrated into classrooms of all kinds or for use at home
Cause and effect within the Lakota Banishment story Lesson Plan - Cause and effect within the Lakota Banishment story - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1, OSEU1)
OSEUS, OSEU
Clam Dissection: Student Cut #1 for Lesson Plan Student Cut #1 – Clam dissection for educational use: lesson plans, quizzes, additional dissections and more available at SDPB.org

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(Molluscs, mollusks, phylum, invertebrate, mollusca, PBS Affiliate, pbs, Dissection, freshwater clam, fresh water clam, best dissection, lab activity, SDPB, DSU, EDU, edu, College, high school, middle school, dissection, Biology, Zoology, Anatomy, cool dissection, clam dissection, adductor muscles, mantle, pallial line, Nacre, Mother of pearl, pearls, labial palps, preserved clam, digestive glands)
Clam Dissection: Student Cut #2 for Lesson Plan Student Cut #2 – Clam dissection for educational use: lesson plans, quizzes, additional dissections and more available at SDPB.org

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(Molluscs, mollusks, phylum, invertebrate, mollusca, PBS Affiliate, pbs, Dissection, freshwater clam, fresh water clam, best dissection, lab activity, SDPB, DSU, EDU, edu, College, high school, middle school, dissection, Biology, Zoology, Anatomy, cool dissection, clam dissection, adductor muscles, mantle, pallial line, Nacre, Mother of pearl, pearls, labial palps, preserved clam, digestive glands)
Clam Dissection: Student Cut #3 for Lesson Plan Student Cut #3 – Clam dissection for educational use: lesson plans, quizzes, additional dissections and more available at SDPB.org

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(Molluscs, mollusks, phylum, invertebrate, mollusca, PBS Affiliate, pbs, Dissection, freshwater clam, fresh water clam, best dissection, lab activity, SDPB, DSU, EDU, edu, College, high school, middle school, dissection, Biology, Zoology, Anatomy, cool dissection, clam dissection, adductor muscles, mantle, pallial line, Nacre, Mother of pearl, pearls, labial palps, preserved clam, digestive glands)
Clam Movement: East of Gavins Point Dam, Yankton Website: Clam dissection, lesson plan and interactive Note: Two clams were lifted during this video to demonstration the retraction of the foot. We do not encourage disturbing clams in nature.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

Club Write 101 Journal Writing Teachers Guide

The Writing Club kids learn about daily writing in a journal.

Club Write provides a comprehensive, contextualized support for developing writing skills at the middle school level. In each program, students are challenged to approach a writing assignment in a different way. 15 minutes


Club Write 102 Biography/Autobiography Teachers Guide

Students pick the subject for their biographies.

Club Write provides a comprehensive, contextualized support for developing writing skills at the middle school level. In each program, students are challenged to approach a writing assignment in a different way. 15 minutes
Club Write 103 Writing Epitaphs Teachers Guide

Teaches poetics and summary as students tour a local cemetery .

Club Write provides a comprehensive, contextualized support for developing writing skills at the middle school level. In each program, students are challenged to approach a writing assignment in a different way. 15 minutes
Club Write 104 Poetry Teachers Guide

A Shakespearean actor presents a poetry reading to the Writing Club.

Club Write provides a comprehensive, contextualized support for developing writing skills at the middle school level. In each program, students are challenged to approach a writing assignment in a different way. 15 minutes
Club Write 105 Persuasive Writing Teachers Guide

Students enter a writing contest that challenges them to create persuasive essays.

Club Write provides a comprehensive, contextualized support for developing writing skills at the middle school level. In each program, students are challenged to approach a writing assignment in a different way. 15 minutes
Club Write 106 Descriptive Writing Teachers Guide

Describe a place so that the reader will feel as if they have been there.

Club Write provides a comprehensive, contextualized support for developing writing skills at the middle school level. In each program, students are challenged to approach a writing assignment in a different way. 15 minutes
Club Write 107 Expository Writing Teachers Guide

Students write about elephants. Club Write provides a comprehensive, contextualized support for developing writing skills at the middle school level. In each program, students are challenged to approach a writing assignment in a different way. 15 minutes
Club Write 108 Math Writing Teachers Guide

The students focus on architectural elements and write a creative story.

Club Write provides a comprehensive, contextualized support for developing writing skills at the middle school level. In each program, students are challenged to approach a writing assignment in a different way. 15 minutes
Club Write 109 Writing Reports Teachers Guide

Each club member writes a report on a career for their Web page.

Club Write provides a comprehensive, contextualized support for developing writing skills at the middle school level. In each program, students are challenged to approach a writing assignment in a different way. 15 minutes
Club Write 110 Point of View Teachers Guide

Kyle wonders how a story might change if told from a different point of view.

Club Write provides a comprehensive, contextualized support for developing writing skills at the middle school level. In each program, students are challenged to approach a writing assignment in a different way. 15 minutes
Club Write 111 Writing the News Teachers Guide

The Writing Club starts a school newspaper.

Club Write provides a comprehensive, contextualized support for developing writing skills at the middle school level. In each program, students are challenged to approach a writing assignment in a different way. 15 minutes
Club Write 113 Writing a Research Paper Teachers Guide

Learn to research, write, revise, and publish research papers.

Club Write provides a comprehensive, contextualized support for developing writing skills at the middle school level. In each program, students are challenged to approach a writing assignment in a different way. 15 minutes
Club Write 114 Lyric Writing Teachers Guide

A songwriter explains the parts of a song and helps students compose lyrics.

Club Write provides a comprehensive, contextualized support for developing writing skills at the middle school level. In each program, students are challenged to approach a writing assignment in a different way. 15 minutes
Comparing North American Origin Stories Lesson Plan - Comparing North American Origin Stories - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2: OSEUS2, OSEU2)
OSEUS, OSEU
Conference Worksheets Activity sheets lower left.
Corpus Callosum - Brain/Nervous System Demonstration Scientific American Frontiers: The Man With Two Brains
- YouTube
- Click PIECES OF MIND Episode

- Video Lesson A cool activity used to test if your corpus callosum (the part of the brain that connects the right and left hemisphere) is connected. Your students/kids will love this one!

Click the player (left) to watch the video lesson. Also, watch related video below. Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

Cow Eye Dissection: Student Cut #1 for Lesson Plan Student Cut #1 – Cow eye dissection for educational use: lesson plans, quizzes, additional dissections and more available at SDPB.org

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(Cow eye coweye phylum vertebrate PBS Affiliate pbs Dissection best dissection lab activity SDPB DSU EDU edu College high gov GOV school middle school dissection Biology Zoology Anatomy sight cool dissection iris pupil retina detached retina lens choroid coat tapetum lucidum cornea vitreous humor sclera cones rods optic nerve eye ball beef eye university Cow eye Dakota State University South Dakota Public Broadcasting)
Cow Eye Dissection: Student Cut #2 for Lesson Plan Student Cut #2 – Cow eye dissection for educational use: lesson plans, quizzes, additional dissections and more available at SDPB.org

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(Cow eye coweye phylum vertebrate PBS Affiliate pbs Dissection best dissection lab activity SDPB DSU EDU edu College high gov GOV school middle school dissection Biology Zoology Anatomy sight cool dissection iris pupil retina detached retina lens choroid coat tapetum lucidum cornea vitreous humor sclera cones rods optic nerve eye ball beef eye university Cow eye Dakota State University South Dakota Public Broadcasting)
Cow Eye Dissection: Student Cut #3 for Lesson Plan Student Cut #3 – Cow eye dissection for educational use: lesson plans, quizzes, additional dissections and more available at SDPB.org

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(Cow eye coweye phylum vertebrate PBS Affiliate pbs Dissection best dissection lab activity SDPB DSU EDU edu College high gov GOV school middle school dissection Biology Zoology Anatomy sight cool dissection iris pupil retina detached retina lens choroid coat tapetum lucidum cornea vitreous humor sclera cones rods optic nerve eye ball beef eye university Cow eye Dakota State University South Dakota Public Broadcasting)
Cow Eye Dissection: Student Cut #4 for Lesson Plan Student Cut #4 – Cow eye dissection for educational use: lesson plans, quizzes, additional dissections and more available at SDPB.org

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(Cow eye coweye phylum vertebrate PBS Affiliate pbs Dissection best dissection lab activity SDPB DSU EDU edu College high gov GOV school middle school dissection Biology Zoology Anatomy sight cool dissection iris pupil retina detached retina lens choroid coat tapetum lucidum cornea vitreous humor sclera cones rods optic nerve eye ball beef eye university Cow eye Dakota State University South Dakota Public Broadcasting)
Critical thinking Lewis and Clark Expedition Lesson Plan - Critical thinking Lewis and Clark Expedition - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
OSEUS, OSEU
D. Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing - Cube Addition Video - Cube Addition: Artist Dick Termes adds cubes together to create more complex objects. An animated video shows examples in the real world of objects composed of combined cubes.

Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing is a multi-part video series featuring South Dakota artist Dick Termes teaching basic drawing techniques. Resources available for the project are described in the following Teaching and User’s Guide and are available at PBS Learning Media. The series includes more than five hours of content in 20 individual videos (Preview), activities, a teacher’s guide and lesson plans that could be integrated into classrooms of all kinds or for use at home.
Dakota Life: A Book and a Show SDPB Dakota Life
Jean L.S. Patrick, Children's Author

Award winning children's book author Jean L.S. Patrick shares her passion for reading and writing, and why she prefers writing for kids. Patrick is a successful children’s author who has published many books, including “The Girl who Struck Out Babe Ruth”, “Who Carved the Mountain?”, “If I had a Snowplow” and a number of other stories. She lives in Mitchell and gives presentations to children in classrooms and libraries. She is also involved in the Society for Children’s Writers and Illustrators of the Dakotas. (writer, literature, Jackie Mitchell, baseball, journaling, research, fiction, nonfiction, how to write a book) (Air Date: 02/05/2009)

Dakota Life: A Life Well Lived: Hazel Mahone SDPB Dakota Life
A Life Well Lived: Hazel Mahone

Hazel Mahone of Huron is the granddaughter of a slave, lived through the depression and two World Wars. She has traveled to over 80 countries in her 90-plus years. (history, people of color, black, racism, segregation, business, Christian Women United – Human Rights Award)

(SDPB Air Date: 01/03/2008)

Dakota Life: A South Dakota Guide SDPB Dakota Life
South Dakota State Historical Society Press: A South Dakota Guide

This Dakota Life is about A South Dakota Guide, which is a 2005 reprint of the 1930s WPA American Guide. The 1930s guide was part of the Federal Writers' Project. The geological, historical, cultural, and economic information contained in this encyclopedic guide offers valuable insights into early and Depression-era South Dakota. The guide provides a panoramic view of South Dakota life and landscape in the 1930s. (South Dakota Historical Society, Festival of Books, South Dakota Works Progress Administration, Federal Writers' Project, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, relief program, history, 1930's, Dust Bowl, Lisle Reese, SD history, MSS manuscripts, periodical, WPA projects, American Guide Services)

(SDPB Air Date: 10/05/2006)
Dakota Life: Agnes Allen, Professional Ballplayer SDPB Dakota Life
SD All-American Girls Professional Baseball League

In 1943 the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League was formed as a replacement for the men's league when most of those players went off to fight in World War II. By 1954 the league had dissolved. This short eleven year period is a slice of time that a select few were able to be a part of. One of those select few is Sioux Falls resident Agnes Allen. (homefront, home front, sports, entertainment, recreation, Springfield Sallies, Kalamazoo Lassies, pitcher) (Air Date: 06/03/2010)
Dakota Life: Agricultural Heritage Museum SDPB Dakota Life
Agricultural Heritage Museum

Visitors to the State Agricultural Heritage Museum in Brookings will understand the important role of agriculture in South Dakota's past, present, and future. The museum is located on the SDSU Campus. (restoration, history, pioneer life, steam engine, Farm Horse Tractor (Hartford, SD), Dakota Tractor (De Smet, SD), Ekern Bros. (Flandreau, SD), South Dakota Made, invention, Briggs and Stratton Engines (Watertown, SDSU), seed sacks, Overby Brothers – mouse traps (Mellette, SD))

(SDPB Air Date: 11/02/2006)


Dakota LIfe: Artist Mary Groth SDPB Dakota Life
Made in South Dakota Mary Groth Fine Art

Mary Groth is among the most popular and highly accomplished artists in South Dakota. She was born in Aberdeen, South Dakota. She founded her art on the inspirations drawn from a lifetime of observing and experiencing the rural prairie.
Groth pursued art at Michigan State University, the University of Minnesota, and Northern State University. In 1995 Groth was inducted into the South Dakota Hall of Fame. (draw, paint, painting, career, illustrator, commissioned, art piece, color, picture) (Airdate 01/08/2009)

Dakota Life: Badlands Bison Roundup SDPB Dakota Life
Badlands Bison Roundup
Traditional use of Tatanka (buffalo)
The Badlands Nature's Time Capsule

Badlands Bison Roundup The National Parks Service employees working in South Dakota's Badlands take great care during the Park's annual bison roundup. This segment describes the history of bison on the Great Plains and in the Badlands. The roundup and the reasons for it are also discussed. (microchip, disease, testing, wildlife biologist, genes, grazing, ranger, veterinarian, rancher, Frederick Dupree, James "Scotty" Philip, buffalo, prairie, wallow, science, biology, native species, evolution, herbivore, herd, cattle, calf, cow, railroad, extinction, buffalo skulls photo, research, coral, head gates, squeeze chutes, pens, Black Hills) (Air Date: 09/03/2009)
Dakota Life: Bear Butte South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6)

SDPB Dakota Life
Bear Butte State Park

Bear Butte - Great Native leaders such as Red Cloud, Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull all sought out the location known as Bear Butte for spiritual guidence. (05/05/2005)




Dakota Life: Bio-Control Agriculture SDPB Dakota Life
South Dakota Department of Agriculture

Bio-Control Agriculture The Department of Agriculture is participating in a bio-control program that introduces insects to an area to help control different types of weeds. Purple loosestrife roots will be used to raise Galerucella (leaf-feeding beetles). The bugs will be raised at the South Dakota Human Services Center. Plans are also in the works for a natural solution for the leafy spurge and knapweed. (Eurasia, pest, chemical, herbicide, Asian lady beetle, native species, noxious weed, nonnative species, introduced species, root hair, tap root, lateral root, bud, soybean aphid, pasture, prairie, natural enemy, South Dakota Department of Agriculture, SDSU Extension Service, host plant, larva, egg, lifecycle, ovipositor, Aphthona flea beetle, parasitoid female) (Air Date: 06/11/2009)

Dakota Life: Black Hills Cavy Club SDPB Dakota Life
Western Hills Rabbit and Cavy Club

The Western Hills Rabbit and Cavy Club is a local club dedicated to further the enjoyment of owning rabbits and cavies. The club sponsors two shows per year and numerous other events. (cavies, 4-H, county fair, guinea pig, buisness, genetics, breeding)

(SDPB Air Date: 04/05/2007)

Dakota Life: Black Hills Fly Fishing SDPB Dakota Life
Waters of South Dakota

The Black Hills FlyFishers Club not only enjoys fishing, they also support conservation efforts to ensure fresh clean water for the next generation. (hobby, algae, fishing, trout, drought, stream, scientific study, restrictions, volunteer, fly fishing)

(SDPB Air Date: 11/01/2007)
Dakota Life: Bringing Back Tatanka SDPB Dakota Life
Sinte Gleska University Bison Ranch
Traditional use of Tatanka (buffalo)

A long time dream of Sinte Gleska University President Lionel Bordeaux, the Sinte Gleska University Bison Ranch was founded with 2 buffalo donated by the Montana Education Consortium in 1994. With no place to put the buffalo nor any way to transport them, they remained in Montana, a promise that fueled President Bordeaux’s dream as he joked about going to get the buffalo and riding them along Interstate 90 to the Sicangu Homelands 600 miles east. In 1996, the Rosebud Sioux Tribal Council granted Sinte Gleska University 1,600 acres of land east of Mission, South Dakota, to be used as a new campus and the beginnings of the bison ranch.
The first 14 buffalo were brought to the Ranch in 1999 from Wind Cave National Park in the Black Hills. In 2000, Sinte Gleska University purchased 40 head of buffalo, and in 2002, ranchers donated 131 head of buffalo to the University. (Native American, Indian, business, Mission, SD, reservation, Lakota, tradition, herd, ancestors hide tanning, culture, belief, creation story)

(SDPB Air Date 11/02/2006 )

Dakota Life: Bringing Back the Bow South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7)

SDPB Dakota Life
Bringing Back the Bow

In this segment, the Dakota Life crew heads to Eagle Butte for the "Bringing Back the Bow" program. This program teaches kids bow craftsmanship as well as archery basics. (heritage, camp, arrow, reservation, Cheyenne River, responsibility, Bridger, hunters, challenges, tradition, art, volunteer, teepee, mechanics, earn, make, accomplish, culture, Lakota, elders, values, respect, generosity, teach, target) (Air Date: 11/05/2009)

Dakota Life: Brule SDPB Dakota Life
Brule

This is the story of the contemporary Native American music group "Brule"". "Brule" has become one of the top-selling Native American recording artists with more than a million CDs sold worldwide. (creativity, Indian, tradition, Lower Brule, Sioux Tribe, heritage, career, adoption, ancestors, pow-wow, powwow, pow wow, pau wau, fine

(SDPB Air Date: 06/07/2007)

Dakota Life: Camp Opera SDPB Dakota Life
Camp Opera

Scott Piper is a world-renowned opera singer who is currently residing in Vermillion. He has designed an opera program geared for pre-school age kids. The program will conclude with a show featuring the kids and Scott Piper performing together. (music, education, art, dance, tenor, Song Birds Group, mentor, instrument, musical, fine arts) (Airdate 02/05/2009)

Dakota Life: Carthage South Dakota SDPB Dakota Life
Carthage South Dakota

Guest Producer Paul Higbee takes us to the town of Carthage, where Sean Penn recently shot some of his movie “Into the Wild”. We look at the town’s history, its Straw Bale Museum and its people. (niche, history, 1919 fire, rebuild, Frank Ward 1882, Cartage New York, railroad, prairie town, social, lake, dam) (Airdate 07/03/2008)

Dakota Life: Casey Tibbs Rodeo Center SDPB Dakota Life
Casey Tibbs South Dakota Rodeo Center

South Dakota history is full of stories about the wide-open prairie and an independent spirit that is still alive today. The story of South Dakota native and rodeo star Casey Tibbs embodies the iconic American cowboy. The Casey Tibbs South Dakota Rodeo Center is a historical museum devoted to the sport of South Dakota rodeo; the history and its stars. (Fort Pierre, horse, wagon train, saddle bronc rider, world champion, Great Plains Indian, Little Britches, South Dakota Rodeo Association, 4-H, Contract X, Stock Contractors, cowgirl, artists, sculpture, Mattie Goff-Newcombe) (Air Date: 02/04/2010)


Dakota Life: Cecil's Siege SDPB Dakota Life
Cecil's Siege

CeCil’s Siege is a Renaissance Festival. It is a sponsored event by a number of local SCA (The Society of Creative Anachronisms) groups. There is jousting, archery, and many more activities. (battle, sword, history, culture, Middle Ages, armor, weaver, blacksmith, Kingdom of Northshield)

(Airdate 02/08/2008)
Dakota Life: Chapel Car SDPB Dakota Life
1880 Train
Historical Prairie Village
State of South Dakota Office of Railroads
South Dakota State Railroad Museum

Dakota Life visits the historic "Chapel Car" on display at Prairie Village in Madison South Dakota. (western plains, church, religion, 1890, congregation, missionary, Reverend Boston Smith, history, train, Railroad, RR, locomotive, volunteer)

(SDPB Air Date: 10/05/2006)
Dakota Life: Children's Care Hospital and School: Adaptive Aquatics SDPB Dakota Life
Adaptive Aquatics

This episode of Dakota Life looks at The Children's Care Hospital and School of Sioux Falls which has a unique swimming program called Adaptive Aquatics. The program is for children with special needs. Many of the children participate in the Special Olympics. (disabilities, handicap, adaptive aquatics, social skills, cerebral palsy, development, volunteer, autism, sports, special education, education teach)

(SDPB Air Date: 09/07/2006)
Dakota Life: Cleaning Mount Rushmore SDPB Dakota Life
Mount Rushmore National Memorial
The National Parks America's Best Idea
American Experience Mount Rushmore

Cleaning Mount Rushmore This episode features spectacular video showing National Parks Service workers using helicopters, ropes and harnesses to access every part of the sculpture. (Mount Rushmore National Memorial, patriotic, historical event, icon, carving, national treasure, granite, Gutzon Borglum, maintenance, lichen, science, engineering, rock, biocorrosion (bio corrosion), KARCHER, monuments, historic, Black Hills, sculptor, acid) (Air Date: 09/03/2009)

Dakota Life: Contemporizing Tradition South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7)

SDPB Dakota Life
South Dakota Arts Council
Sioux Indian Museum

Contemporizing Tradition - Contemporary Native American Artist Randall Blaze lives on Cuny Table on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. His artwork reflects Native American Tradition, but in a contemporary way. His art work includes Acrylic oil painting, Bronze Sculptures, Ceramics and Metal Smithing. (11/03/2005)


Dakota Life: Covered Wagon Trains SDPB Dakota Life
South Dakota Historical Society: South Dakota Transportation

This Dakota Life segment looks at a recreating a historic mode of travel – the wagon train. A South Dakota native is planning to cross SD from the Minnesota boarder to the Montana border in a small home built covered wagon pulled by horses. Dakota Life goes along for a ride. (history, prairie, ride, mule, hobby, old west, pioneer)

(SDPB Air Date: 04/06/2006)


Dakota Life: Crazy Horse Journalism South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7)

SDPB Dakota Life
Freedom Forum Diversity Institute

Crazy Horse Journalism - An opportunity for Native American high school students to explorer higher education options and careers in journalism. The annual workshop is held on the campus at the Crazy Horse memorial near Custer. (01/05/2012)


Dakota Life: Dakota State University Baseball – Sports Announcer SDPB Dakota Life
DSU Trojan Baseball

The DSU Baseball team has two unique people announcing the play by play and stats. Keith Bundy, who is legally blind, announces the play by play and Nick Huntimer, who is hearing impaired, records the stats. (sports, handicap, braille, brail, deaf, hard of hearing, disability, disabled, role model, mentor, inspire, pride, courage, sight)

(SDPB Air Date: 05/03/2007)
Dakota Life: Deadwood Trail SDPB Dakota Life
Deadwood Trail

Some 300 people drove wagons and rode horseback from Fort Pierre to Deadwood in July of 2008. The trail they followed was first used by Native Americans, followed by fur trappers, and the Calvary. During the gold rush, the trail was used to haul freight, mining equipment, supplies and people to Deadwood. (map, Black Hills, Bear Butte, wagon master, Treaty of 1877, settlers, train, homesteading, barbed wire, history, heritage, culture, stagecoach, Trail of Broken Treaties, Lakota, Indian) (Airdate 10/01/2008)

Dakota Life: Disabled Veteran Hunting Trips SDPB Dakota Life
South Dakota Game Fish and Parks

South Dakota offers hunting outings for disabled veterans with special needs. Join us as we go along on one of these trips to see how the program works and how it affects the veterans. (sportsman, sport, hobby, volunteer, business, niche, outdoor, handicap) (Airdate 05/01/2008)

Dakota Life: Duane Strand, Violin Maker SDPB Dakota Life
National Music Museum, Vermillion

Dakota Life travels to Langford South Dakota to learn about the craftsmanship of violin maker Duane Strand. Duane Strand makes violins and other instruments. The 77 year old retiree has made 18 violins and dozens of other instruments including guitars, mandolins and dulcimers. (music, history, fine arts, industrial arts, hobby, Roselyn South Dakota, legacy, heritage)

(SDPB Air Date: 06/07/2007)


Dakota Life: Earl Sande: Tragedy to Triumph SDPB Dakota Life
South Dakota Hall of Fame, Earl Sande
National Museum of Racing Hall of Fame, Earl Sande

This episode of Dakota Life is about Earl Sande; a South Dakota native you can find in the horse racing record books. He was a horse racing jockey who won the prestigious Triple Crown in 1930. (sport, Groton, history, Hall of Fame jockey, Kentucky Derby, Belmont Stakes)

(SDPB Air Date: 05/04/2006)
Dakota Life: Elders' Wisdom, Children's Songs SDPB Dakota Life
Elders Wisdom Children's Songs

Elders’ Wisdom, Children’s Song is a program designed to teach youth about their elders. The fourth-grade class at Custer Elementary School selects an elder from the area, and then they work with local music teachers to create a tribute song for that elder. The song is then performed live at a concert. (first person, interview, language arts, fine arts, history, perform)

(Airdate: 04/03/2008)
Dakota Life: Equine Therapy SDPB Dakota Life
Equine Therapy

The Dakota Life crew stops by SunCatcher Therapeudic Riding Academy. This unique camp specializes in equine therapy programs for kids, teens and adults with special needs. (horse, hypotherapy (hypo therapy), disability, physical therapy, cognitive therapy, emotional therapy, stretching, physical education, physical therapist, ADHD, autism, children, health, fitness, therapeutic riding) (Air Date: 10/08/2009)

Dakota Life: Eureka Kuchen Bakery SDPB Dakota Life
Signs and Symbols of South Dakota
Signs and Symbols at the South Dakota State Capitol

Forget after dinner ice cream - how about trying a dessert that has some historical significance, and of course, tastes great too? SDPB visits a bakery in Eureka, SD, and learns more about the niche product that they've created. (German, tradition, South Dakota State Dessert, kuchen, economic development) (Air Date: 04/01/2010)



Dakota Life: Exploring Wind Cave SDPB Dakota Life
Wind Cave National Park

Exploring Wind Cave The Dakota Life crew travels deep inside Wind Cave National Park and meets the professionals that care for the immense cave system. From cave exploration to the physical sciences, there is much to learn in the first National Park designated to protect a cave system. (Physical Science Technician, spelunking, caving, exploration, tight lead, claustrophobic, compass, map, contortion, survey, natural resource, Black Hills) (Air Date: 09/03/2009)

Grade level: 3-5; 6-8; 9-12
Dakota Life: Field To Table SDPB Dakota Life
South Dakota Department of Agriculture
South Dakota Cooperative Extension Service

The Field to Table program teaches students about the process of farming. The man who conceived the idea and brought it to fruition is Ray Hall, a local farmer who uses his own money, seeds, equipment, land, etc…to put this 2 day event on. (agriculture, heritage, role model, soybean, flax, sugar beets, tobacco, sunflower, cotton, planter, seed planting, hand shelling, combine, harvest)

(SDPB Air Date: 11/02/2006)
Dakota Life: French Medal of Honor SDPB Dakota Life
SDPB: Local Heroes

South Dakotans have long been renowned for their dedicated military service. During World War II, more than 68,000 South Dakota men and women served in the armed forces. Rapid City native Richard Hedden was one of those brave young men. During Richard's Tour of Duty, he found himself in an extremely perilous situation, with only his ingenuity to get to him through. Richard rose to the challenge and recently received France's version of the Congressional Medal of Honor. (WWII, D-Day, infantry, Normandy, veteran, 29th division, draft, service, frontline, shrapnel, war story, Purple Heart, French Cross of War, honor, role model)

(SDPB Air Date: 02/03/2006)
Dakota Life: Gavin’s Point Dam: 50 Year SDPB Dakota Life
Gavin’s Point Dam/ Lewis and Clark Lake

2007 marks the 50th Anniversary of the dam. There is a celebration being planned, coordinators are gathering all kinds of photos and stories. Join us as we take a look at the history of the dam and the impact it had on the community. (engineering, construction, river, lake, dedication, recreation, Pick-Sloan Missouri Basin Program, flood control, cement, career, employment, Bureau of Reclamation, Corp of Engineers, hydroelectric power) (Airdate: 05/01/2008)

Dakota Life: Geocaching SDPB Dakota Life
Geocaching.com

Geocaching (pronounced "geo-cashing") is an outdoor treasure hunt using a hand-held (GPS) Global Positioning System. The Geocachers hide and seek "treasures" which are waterproof containers that typically include a pencil, small notebook to serve as a logbook and several trinkets like key chains, small toys and buttons. Geocachers hide the geocache and enter the coordinates (latitude and longitude) on a website. Others download the coordinates, enter them into their GPS units and head out to find the geocache. (hike, exercise, technology, scavenger hunt, hobby, microcache, Game Fish and Parks, code, decrypt (Airdate 07/03/2008)

Dakota Life: Giddy Up: Spirit of the West Festival SDPB Dakota Life
Spirit of the West Festival

This is an annual festival of all things Western. It features re-enactors, cowboy poetry, shootouts and a Dutch oven cooking contest. (history, historic preservation, culture, generation, chuck wagon, competition, wild west show, blacksmith, whip)

(SDPB Airdate 02/08/2008)
Dakota Life: Historic Buildings SDPB Dakota Life
South Dakota State Historical Society

Many South Dakotans are working hard to keep the buildings they have in use. Scott and Ed Bender of Mitchell recently won an award for their barn refurbishment. Ed was only 5 years old in 1916 when his father built the distinctive arched barn. The Yankton Scottish Rite Masonic Center in Yankton has stood the test of time and is just as functional today as it was when it was constructed. (tradition, rafter, carpenter, barn raising, Barn Again Program, rituals, theater, Blue Lodge, masonry, mason, brick layer)

(SDPB Air Date: 01/03/2008)

Dakota Life: In the Blink of an Eye SDPB Dakota Life
National Server Storm Laboratory

A group of researchers are using high-tech video equipment to capture lightning strikes in Rapid City. What they're learning could benefit tall buildings and towers around the world. (lightning rod, thunderstorm, cumulous nimbus, thunderhead, high-speed camera, National Server Storm Laboratory, earth science, physics) (Air Date: 05/06/2010)

Dakota Life: Iron Horses of the Hills SDPB Dakota Life
1880 Train
Historical Prairie Village
State of South Dakota Office of Railroads
South Dakota State Railroad Museum

"Iron Horses of the Hills" explores the influences of the railroad on the Black Hills and the Northern Plains. The railroads were the catalyst for the westward expansion and for the development of the cities. Good or bad, depending on a person's own heritage and experiences, the railroads and their employees have played a pivotal role in this region and the country. (iron horse, train, freight, grain, coal, transportation, RR, locomotive, J.B. Haggin, Black Hills & Fort Pierre Railroad, Fremont, Elkhorn and Missouri Valley Railroad, Black Hills Railroad, Chicago & Northern Railroad, Burlington Railroad, Rapid City, Black Hills and Western Crouch Lines, electric trolley, 1880 train, Black Hill Center Railroad, mallet (mallay) steam locomotive)
Dakota Life: Kayaker Kelly Lane SDPB Dakota Life
Parkinson Association of South Dakota

Kelly Lane is considered by many to be the father of Black Hills kayaking. Lane was a science teacher for almost two decades before Parkinson's disease took him out of the class room. Today he continues to Kayak when he can, and to teach safe paddling practices to youngsters despite his Parkinson's. (inspiration, boat, sport, exercise, disability, volunteer, deep brain stimulation) (Air Date: 06/03/2010)

Dakota Life: Kevin Pourier – Buffalo Horn Artist South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7)

SDPB Dakota Life
Kevin Pourier – Buffalo Horn Artist

Kevin Pourier has been shaping jewelry and spoons from buffalo horns since 1992. He received a scholarship to study at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington and spent time on the east coast researching buffalo horn artifacts. (Pine Ridge, Native American, Black Hills, career, art, artist, tradition, culture, fine arts, contemporary, craft) (Airdate 11/06/2008)
Dakota Life: LEEDing the Way SDPB Dakota Life
South Dakota Energy Smart
U.S. Green Building Council LEED

LEEDing the Way The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System encourages environmentally friendly building and development practices. The program is having an effect on South Dakota. (recycle, recyclable, efficiency program, reduce, reuse, renewable energy, lights, CFL, compact florescent lamp, light bulb, natural light, South Dakota Energy Smart, electricity, Heartland Consumer Power District, environment, Koch-Hazard Architects, construction, SB 188, 2008) (Air Date: 06/11/2009)
Dakota Life: Mammoth Site NOTE: Not supported by Chrome - Use Explore
or
Download the video below player.

SDPB Dakota Life
Mammoth Site

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

The Mammoth Site in Hot Springs is the world's largest mammoth research facility. The dig, one of South Dakota's treasures, gives visitors a chance to tour an active paleontological site and view a remarkable array of Ice Age fossils. (paleontologist, 26,000 years ago, Columbia mammoth, Black Hills, bones, fossils, excavate, skull, National Geographic, tusks, mandible, Earth Watch, ancient sinkhole, articulate, biological pattern, elephant, family group, offspring, extinction, scientist, preserve, short-faced bear, DNA) (Airdate 10/01/2008)

Dakota Life: Matthews Opera House – A Vibrant Century SDPB Dakota Life
Spearfish Center for the Arts and Humanities: Matthews Opera House

This segment takes a look at the history and the refurbishment of the Matthews Opera House in Spearfish. (history, fine arts, entertainment, concert, plays, renovate)

(SDPB Air Date: 04/05/2007)

Dakota Life: Meeker Ranch Paintings SDPB Dakota Life
National Forest Service

Painter Jon Crane is rallying an effort to preserve historic Meeker Ranch. It's a run down ranch that the Forest Service acquired and planned to demolish for safety reasons. Jon Crane wants to preserve it, and he's raised money by holding an outdoor painting workshop. All of the artists that painted at the ranch are selling their works at a "wet auction". Proceeds go to preserving the ranch. (art, paint, Black Hills, Custer, picture, painting, artist, barns, history, inspiration) (Airdate 01/08/2009)
Dakota Life: Meeting the Need Camp SDPB Dakota Life
Meeting the Need Camp


Dallas Dietrich has lived a typical South Dakota life...family, career, and a volunteer. Dallas helped with a ski program for the blind. A car accident would change Dallas's life forever, and he would eventually need the use of a wheelchair due to his injuries. But his desire to help others hasn't faltered, and Dallas created his very own adventure camp for those with special needs. (National College, National American University, Ski for Lights, disabilities, Keystone, career, tourism, blizzard, driving, resilience, Black Hills, accessible, volunteers, bunkhouse, cookhouse, vacation, therapeutic) (Air Date: 02/04/2010)
Dakota Life: Michael Dresch – Guitar Maker SDPB Dakota Life
Michael Dresch – Guitar Maker

Michael Dresch is an electric guitar maker in Sioux Falls. He designs guitars to the client’s specifications. He carves both flat and carved guitars. (music, art, wood working, fine arts, career, business, hobby) (Airdate 11/06/2008)

Dakota Life: Michael Hill – Potter SDPB Dakota Life
Michael Hill – Potter

Michael Hill currently from Volin, SD creates a wide variety of functional pottery from salad bowls to unique vases. (ceramics, art, artist, mentor, kiln, education, clay, University of South Dakota, potter) (Airdate 11/06/2008)

Dakota Life: Miners Return to Homestake SDPB Dakota Life
Sanford Underground Laboratory at Homestake

The former workers of the Homestake Gold Mine are being hired to assist in the transformation of the mine into the Sanford Underground Science Laboratory. (science lab, neutrino, mining, miners, 4,850 feet, LUX Particle Accelerator, career, employment, South Dakota Science and Technology Authority, physics, water, experiment, Dr. Jose Alonso) (Airdate: 05/07/2009)

Dakota Life: Missouri River Expeditions, Kayaking SDPB Dakota Life
Missouri National Recreation River
Nature Adventures: Waters of South Dakota
Missouri National Recreational River Water Trail

Dakota Life takes a look at kayaking down the Missouri River. (hobby, water sport, business, entrepreneur, Fort Randall, Running Water, Yankton, Ponca, nature, log jams)

(SDPB Air Date: 02/03/2006)
Dakota Life: Mouth Painter Jack Reich SDPB Dakota Life

Jack Reich was born with a birth defect that limited the use of his arms and legs. He overcame these issues in his own way, learning to paint and draw with his mouth. Jack lives in Isabel, SD, and is a member of the Association of Foot and Mouth Painters of World. (Dewey County, disabilities, arts, scenery, prairie, color, Moreau, ranch, chores, Dupree, pencil, education, SDSU, family, observation, Lichtenstein Germany, prints, creativity, writing, novel, fiction) (Air Date: 01/07/2010)

Dakota Life: National Unicycle Championships SDPB Dakota Life
The North American Unicycling Convention and Championships

Rapid City will host the North American Unicycle Championships. Three hundred of the best off-road and on-road unicyclists from Canada and the US will be competing in various events. (fitness, health, competition, sport, club, hobby, bicycle, Black Hills, tricks, header, penny-farthing, high wheel, high wheeler, and ordinary) (Air Date: 04/02/2009)


Dakota Life: Native American Artist Joanne Bird South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2: OSEUS2)

SDPB Dakota Life
Joanne Bird

A Style Of Her Own - Joanne Bird of Bushnell has earned national recognition for her unique paintings and sculptures. The Native American artist is represented in the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C. (01/01/2004)



Dakota Life: Native Gardens South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1)
(Essential Understanding 2: OSEUS2)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7)

SDPB Dakota Life
Dakota Digest: Native Gardens Project
CDC What is Diabetes?

Native Gardens - The loss of the buffalo was devastating to the Native American tribes who depended on the animals. A major food source was gone and some believe that the food supply in the early days of the reservations led to serious health problems that linger to this day. Now, a project to bring back the traditional Native American diet on the Standing Rock Reservation is growing garden by garden. (01/06/2011) (Native Garden Project, gather, hunter, diabetes, Standing Rock, diabetic, Gladys Hawk)




Dakota Life: Nellie Two Bulls South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7)

SDPB Dakota Life
South Dakota Public Broadcasting's Celebrating Native America Culture Page

It is impossible to know how many lives Nellie Two Bulls has influenced. She was referred to as "Grandma Nellie" by thousands. She sang in Kevin Costner's "Dances With Wolves" movie and at a service on the east coast to celebrate Robert F. Kennedy's life. She was a sacred repository for the songs and stories of the Lakota People. Her voice evoked the old days but resonated with all who listened to her in these changing times. She was the 2006 Spirit Award winner.

(SDPB Air Date: 05/03/2007)
Dakota Life: Painter Eyob Mergia SDPB Dakota Life
Painter Eyob Mergia

An Ethiopian born and raised painter, Eyob Mergia graduated from the Ethiopian Fine Arts Institute in Addis Ababa in 1993. He immigrated to Sioux Falls in 1997, where his work has flourished. He has participated in many exhibitions, appeared in numerous publications, painted several murals and is represented in private collections nationwide. He works with high school students on art and diversity projects as well. (artist, art, career, drawing, mentor) (01/08/2009)
Dakota Life: Painter Mi Young Lee SDPB Dakota Life
Mi Young Lee

Mi Young Lee is an accomplished painter and exhibiting artist. Her journey to become a renowned painter is one of hard work and determination. She is an Adjunct Assistant Professor at the University of South Dakota Department of Art. Her studio is located in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. (art, abstract art, dream, goal, Korea, expressionism, symbolism)

(SDPB Air Date: 09/06/2007)
Dakota Life: Paul Schiller Photographs SDPB Dakota Life
Acts of Nature

Paul Schiller started his career as a photojournalist, and after years of putting his energies into advertising, Paul returned to his roots as a fine art nature photographer. Now he and his wife, Koni, created Acts of Nature®, an innovative imaging company specializing in "interior landscaping." (photograph, perspective, photo, macro photography, business, hobby, macro flora, panoramic)

(SDPB Air Date: 09/06/2007)



Dakota Life: Photographer Paul Horsted - Standing In History SDPB Dakota Life
Paul Horsted: Dakota Photographic LLC

This Dakota Life segment looks at photographer and book publisher Paul Horsted. We take a look at Paul's most recent project, as well as past projects, on what he calls Re-Photography. Paul finds old photographs of the Black Hills area (late 1800s to early 1900s) and goes to the same location to re-photograph the same picture. The changes and similarities you see in the ""then"" and ""now"" photos are remarkable. (artist, picture, published book, fine art, Exploring With Custer, The Black Hills Yesterday and Today, reference point, Pactola Lake, nature)

(SDPB Air Date: 04/06/2006)



Dakota Life: Plein Air or Paint Out SDPB Dakota Life
South Dakota Arts Council

“Plein Air” art means painting outdoors. For the past 2 years the SD Plein Air Artists hold a "Paint-Out". The group picks a locale and paints outdoors. (state parks, art, photos, fine arts, artist, landscape, photograph, photographer, nature, Garretson)

(SDPB Air Date: 02/02/2007)
Dakota Life: Polka Fest SDPB Dakota Life
Corn Palace: Polka Festival
Tabor Czech Days

Every year hundreds of Polka enthusiasts flock to Mitchell for Polka Fest. Musical acts from across the region attend. (music, culture, tuba, base, Corn Palace, dance, Czech Republic, accordion, Bear Barrel Polkas, Roll Out the Barrel, hobby, exercise)

(SDPB Air Date: 01/05/2006)

Dakota Life: Preserving the Sioux Language South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7)

SDPB Dakota Life
Association on American Indian Affairs
South Dakota Public Broadcasting's Celebrating Native America Culture Page

The future survival of Sioux languages like Lakota, Nakota, and Dakota is uncertain. A group on the Lake Traverse Reservation is working to ensure its language will be alive and well. A special Scrabble game in the Sioux language has been developed. The game is part of the tribe's campaign to revitalize the Dakota Language. (tradition, Indian, Native American, culture, pictograph, winter count, elders, translate, Waubay, tribe, Enemy Swim, Dakota Scrabble)

(SDPB Air Date: 01/04/2007)

Dakota Life: Quilted Works of Art SDPB Dakota Life
Bush Foundation

Vi Colombe was born at the Klamath Indian Agency in Oregon. Vi has lived on the Rosebud Reservation for the last 40 years. She offers a wonderful story about discovering talents later in life. Vi starting quilting 8 years ago, and discovered an incredible talent for the art. She makes quilts that have been purchased by notables such as Ken Burns. (heritage, culture, artist, circle quilt, star quilt, business, entrepreneur, Bush Fellowship Grant, gallery, niche, marketing plan) (Airdate 09/01/2008)
Dakota Life: Raku Pottery Workshop SDPB Dakota Life
Raku Pottery Workshop

In this Dakota Life segment, the Dakota Life crew heads to Beresford and spends the day with students learning all about Raku pottery. Raku pottery is created by a special firing process resulting in unique patterns and designs. Special glazes, and even horse hairs, are used to create this different look. (art, education, chemical, chemistry, clay, Japan, China, oven, kiln, wheel, greenware/ green ware) (Air Date: 11/05/2009)

Dakota Life: Red Cloud Art Show South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7)

SDPB Dakota Life
Red Cloud Museum

Red Cloud School near Pine Ridge holds an annual Native artist art show. The show has helped many artists from different tribes launch careers in art. The Red Cloud Heritage Center Museum has more than 2,000 permanent pieces and is considered one of the finest collections of Native art in the region. The Red Cloud Indian School on the Pine Ridge Reservation is a place where education, spirituality, cultural pride, and art converge to inspire lives. (education, Native American, Indian, artifact, heritage, history, heritage center, painting, painter, reservation)

(SDPB Air Date: 09/06/2007)

Dakota Life: Sabers’ Specialties – Motorcycles SDPB Dakota Life
Sabers’ Specialties – Motorcycles

The Sabers family of Mitchell started a custom motorcycle business in 2005. The business has had considerable success. They have won awards at national shows and their bike, “SODAK Special” won the “Sturgis Bike of the Year” in 2007. (transportation, rally, tourism, career, automotive technician, EPA, emissions control, entrepreneur, manufacture, business, dealer, niche) (09/01/2008)
Dakota Life: SD National Guard Museum SDPB Dakota Life
Department of Military and Veteran Affairs: SD National Guard Museum

The SD National Guard Museum in Pierre holds a collection of National and Air National guard uniforms, vehicles, and dozens of themed displays showing the involvement of the SD Guard from the Civil War up through today’s involvement in the Middle East. (history, armed forces, army, volunteer, airplane, Spirit of South Dakota)

(SDPB Air Date: 05/04/2006)
Dakota Life: SD Sportsmen Against Hunger SDPB Dakota Life
South Dakota Sportsmen Against Hunger

Many people in South Dakota live at or below the poverty level. A primary food shortage is fresh meat. The South Dakota Sportsmen Against Hunger program has collected thousands of pounds of game meat for the needy in SD. (food bank, poverty, hunting, food assistance, Safari International, nutrition, deer) (Air Date: 04/01/2010)

Dakota Life: Sicangu Lakota Artist Mike Marshall South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7)

SDPB Dakota Life
Sicangu Lakota Artist Mike Marshall

In this Dakota Life segment we head to Mission to meet artist Mike Marshall. Mike builds traditional Lakota games and crafts, and incorporates all natural materials in his works. In his paintings, however, Mike is always pushing himself to explore new methods and materials. (art, create, Sinte Gleska, reservation, colors, pictograph, ledger, Amos Bad Heart Bull, Pine Ridge, hunt, outdoors, feathers, antlers, culture, dolls, travois, batik, dyes, wax, landscape, Red Cloud Indian School, buffalo robe, heritage, museum) (Air Date: 01/07/2010)


Dakota Life: Sioux Messengers South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6)

SDPB Dakota Life
Code Talkers in American Military History
Local Heroes

Sioux Messengers - Meet a man who's actions during World War II echo through history. Sixty two years ago he helped save the lives of American soldiers by speaking his native tounge. (09/02/2004)

Dakota Life: Soaring and Gliding Over the Black Hills SDPB Dakota Life
Black Hills Soaring Club

The Black Hills Soaring Club is a club in the southern hills where glider enthusiasts get together and soar above the Black Hills in their un-powered gliders. (sport, hobby, fly, ultra light, airplane, flight, Bernoulli's, lift, hot spots, thermals, ridge lift, mountain wave activity)

(Air Date: 06/01/2006)

Dakota Life: Sorraia Horse Preservation SDPB Dakota Life
Caballos de Destino Ranch

The Sorraia horse is an endangered South Iberian wild horse, or a direct descendant of that wild subspecies. At Caballos de Destino Ranch near Hot Springs they are engaged in the preservation of these horses, and are fortunate to have a herd of Sorraia mustangs. (business, Spanish mustang, killing of the wild horses, stallion, 4-H, county fair, endangered, selective breeding, survival of the fittest)

(SDPB Air Date: 01/04/2007)
Dakota Life: South Dakota Grasslands Coalition: Bird Walks SDPB Dakota Life
South Dakota Grasslands Coalition

The South Dakota Grassland Coalition hosted a bird watching tour in the Black Hills. The tour, “Birds. At Home, On the Range”, took the participants on a journey through ranches in the Black Hills to observe and record native bird species. They learned about the relationship between land stewardship and wildlife habitat. (bird watching, grassland management, indicator species, conservation)

(SDPB Air Date: 11/01/2007)
Dakota Life: South Dakota Poet SDPB Dakota Life
Yvonne Hollenbeck's Website

Meet Yvonne Hollenbeck of Clearfield who was the 2006 National Cowboy Poet of the Year, and Yankton Poet Elizabeth Lewis. Last summer at the age of 90, Elizabeth entered her first poetry slam contest and won. (language arts, Western Music Award, Poet of the Year, Nature's Church, Roper's Wife's Lament, Academy of Western Artist, Thirty Again, emotion, feelings, courage, composing) (Airdate 07/03/2008)


Dakota Life: South Dakota Sea Monsters SDPB Dakota Life
Museum of Geology

Take a step back in time and see what creatures used to swim in the waters of South Dakota. In this segment we'll look at mosasaurs and plesiosaurs, two terrifying and fascinating creatures that swam the Interior Seaway. We'll head to the Museum of Geology in Rapid City, and also see paleontologists working in the field recovering the fossils of these ancient reptiles. (60 million years ago, marine, creature, skeleton, fossil, fish, sharks, dinosaur, carnivore, Globidens Schurmanni, teeth, crustacean, Missouri River, excavate, extinction, extinct, bentonite, volcanic explosion, volcano, catastrophic, sea creature, Black Hills) (Air Date: 10/08/2009)

Dakota Life: South Dakota Special Olympics SDPB Dakota Life
Special Olympics South Dakota

South Dakota Special Olympic summer games will be held in Brookings. In this episode of Dakota Life, we will look at the history of the games in South Dakota and get to know the athletes that participate. (disability, sport, competition, volunteer, competition, socialize, handicap, participation, soccer, track, volleyball, athlete, inclusion, coach) (Airdate: 05/07/2009)

Dakota Life: St. Mary's Boarding School South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2: OSEUS2)
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6)

SDPB Dakota Life
Bon Homme County: County Government Records

St. Mary’s Boarding School for Indian Girls operated from 1873 to 1986. Many of the graduates are very proud of their former school and have moved on to very successful lives. (12/10/03)


Dakota Life: Swanson Family Cowboyography SDPB Dakota Life
Swanson Family Cowboyography
South Dakota Historical Society: Cowboys and Ranch Life

This episode of Dakota Life looks at Cowboyography which is the study of all things Cowboy! The Swanson Family does their best to bring to life the lore and lure of the American Cowboy in photos, song, and demonstrations of the equipment Cowboys use. The key element of the program is giving the audience the chance not only to hear about and look at Cowboy things, but to actually touch, try on real Cowboy gear. (role model, business, ranch, wild west)

(SDPB Airdate 09/07/2006)



Dakota Life: Swift Fox Returns to the Badlands SDPB Dakota Life
Nature Adventures, Mammals
Badlands National Park Swift Fox Curriculum

The Badlands National Park re-introduces the swift fox. Dakota Life tags along as Park Officials conduct their annual fall survey to check the programs progress. (preservation, scientific study, wildlife biologist, South Dakota Game Fish and Parks, predators, trapping, wildlife management, genetics, transponder chip, vaccination, reintroduction)

(SDPB Air Date: 01/04/2007)

Dakota Life: Terry Schuver Sculpture SDPB Dakota Life
SD Arts Council
Prairie Dance: Uniquely Created Sculptures

Metalwork artist Terry Schuver is highlighted in this episode of Dakota Life. "Rise on the Wings of Dawn”, Schuver's largest work to date is on display outside the Avera Behavioral Health Center in Sioux Falls. (steel, fine art, industrial arts, artists, creativity, business, rusting, welding, metal)

(SDPB Air Date: 02/02/2007)
Dakota Life: The 1880’s Steam Train SDPB Dakota Life
The 1880’s Steam Train

Every year there is maintenance completed on the 1880’s train the runs from Hill City to Keystone. Take a behind the scenes look at the trains. (steam engine, Black Hills, wild west, railroad, locomotive, rail road, history, 1889, 1903, highline, Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad, Burlington North, Santa Fe Railroad, transportation, tourism)

(SDPB Airdate 01/03/2008)
Dakota Life: The Baker Brothers South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7)

Untold Stories - Mount Rushmore: Telling America's Stories
SDPB Dakota Life
Badlands National Park
Mount Rushmore National Memorial
The National Parks America's Best Idea

The Baker Brothers In this Dakota Life segment, we'll meet brothers Paige and Gerard Baker. After a lifetime of crossing the country, the brothers have found themselves right in each other's backyards, both working as Park Superintendents. Paige works at Badlands National Park and Gerard works at Mount Rushmore National Memorial. Watch this amazing story as we learn how the brothers went from boys at Fort Berthold Indian Reservation to holding prestigious positions in the National Park Service. (culture, role model, education, Native American, Indian, Lakota, Nakota, Dakota, Fort Laramie Treaty, history, Custer Battle Field, Little Big Horn Battle Field, employee, career, family, Mandan, Hidatsa, tradition, controversy, Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Project, multicultural, Great Sioux Reservation, Black Hills) (Air Date: 09/03/2009)
Dakota Life: The Quilt Maker South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2: OSEUS2)

SDPB Dakota Life

The Quilt Maker - Jeff Audiss is a Native American artist who has developed his own unique style of quilting vibrant and sybolic quilts. In this segment, we get a chance to watch him at work and learn how he developed his style. (01/01/2004)
Dakota Life: Traditional Art - Michael He Crow South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7)

SDPB Dakota Life
Crazy Horse Memorial
Made in South Dakota

A South Dakota craftsman working at the base of Crazy Horse Monument and keeping alive traditional craft techniques. (01/06/2005)





Dakota Life: Unknown Star – Bully SDPB Dakota Life

Over the past 61 years Elton Rokusek of Tyndall has often wondered what his life might have been like if he hadn't been born with a large hemangioma that covers much of the right side of his face and head. In spite of the fact that he's dealt with medical difficulties, ridicule and self esteem issues, Elton believes he has achieved a great deal. (bully, handicap, disabled, disfigured, friends, family, peers, volunteer, teased, pain, inspiration, hero, idol, mentor, career, motivational speaking) (Airdate 09/01/2008)
Dakota Life: Water in Wind Cave SDPB Dakota Life

Water in Wind Cave Charles Michael Ray goes deep inside Wind Cave National Park and learns what the water inside has to say about the health of the cave. (Physical Science Technician, spelunking, caving, exploration, tight lead, claustrophobic, natural resource, scientific study, research, Southern Black Hills Water System, ecosystem, wells, Madison Aquifer, underground lake, physical science, drought, housing development, project, preserve, natural resources, 4th largest cave in the world, national treasure, indicator dye, contortion, expedition, population growth, shortage of water, H2O) (Air Date: 09/03/2009)


Dakota Life: Xiomarra: Artist and Glassblower SDPB Dakota Life
South Dakota Arts Council

An artist, new to Sioux Falls, is changing the landscape of the city's art scene. Xiomarra is a glass blower who currently resides in Tea. Xiomarra grew up in Costa Rica and her heritage is often reflected in her artwork. Her pieces range from small decorative works such as fruit, flowers, and paperweights to larger pieces of birds, flowers, and vases. (fine art, art show, glass blowing, hobby, business, metal working)

(SDPB Air Date: 06/01/2006)
Dakota Life: Youth Pheasant Hunting Season SDPB Dakota Life
Youth Pheasant Hunt
Birds of South Dakota

For many outdoor enthusiasts, fall means hunting season. The State of South Dakota sets aside a weekend in October for kids to hunt pheasants with adult supervision. One family near Armour makes their land available for Sioux Falls Hunt Safe Classes. Students practice their hunting safety skills during their very own pheasant season. (sport, mentor, Game Fish and Parks, land management, habitat, exercise)

(Air Date: 11/01/2007)
Dakota Pathways Activity Documents Documents
Dakota Pathways Episode 1 - Rails and Other Roads Dakota Pathways Resources

A look at the history of the State of South Dakota through the human migration through the region. From the earliest times, humans have made use of animal trails, streams and rivers to traverse the area now known as South Dakota. This episode looks at the varieties of transportation used by the people of the region. From roads and rivers through railroads and super-highways we explore how transportation has affected the development of our state.

(travel, plane, highway, locomotive, stagecoach, wagon train, homestead act, travois, cattle drives, bridge, automobile, boat)


Dakota Pathways Episode 10 - Headlines and Bulletins Dakota Pathways Resources

The white settlement of the Dakotas brought with it an invention from the fifteenth century, the printing press. Newspapers played a vital role in the region, keeping people informed of the news and allowing them to print land notices. Later on, the inventions of radio and television augmented the newspapers. The history of the state can be read in the headlines and bulletins of the times. They all continue to play a role in our state's development.

(Native American, Indian, gold, Rapid City Journal, Argus Leader, Press and Dakotan, The Weekly Dakotan, Dakota Democrat, telegraph, Frank Baum, Alice Gossage, WNAX, Ida McNeil, KGFX, KELO, KOTA)
Dakota Pathways Episode 11 - Blackboards and Computers Dakota Pathways Resources

Even since territorial days, citizens of the present state of South Dakota have been concerned with the education of their children. From the early log cabins that served as the first schoolhouses to the present day modern schools, citizens have always put education first in their list of concerns. This episode looks at the history of education in South Dakota and how we have progressed from blackboards to computers and what this has meant to the growth of the state.

(Sioux, one room country school, technology, Bon Homme County, harvest, technical school, Dakota Territory - Yankton, Superintendent William Beadle, college, university, property tax, library, school board, Sputnik, consolidation, disabilities, boarding schools, dormitory, reservation school, traditional, teacher, educator)
Dakota Pathways Episode 12 - Maps and Borders Dakota Pathways Resources

Even before the white man entered the upper mid-west region of the United States, borders have marked the various territories of the people living in the region. With the advancement of the white culture those borders have become less fluid. Even so, the borders of South Dakota have changed with the times. This episode looks at how borders have affected our growth as a state and influenced how we live.

(Verendrye Plate, Indians, Native Americans, French-British War, Louisiana Purchase, War of 1812, Dakota Territory, State Borders, Allotment Act, Homestead Act, of Napoleon Bonaparte, Lewis and Clark, satellites, USGS EROS Data Center, Independence Peace Garden, survey, explorers, cartography, Manuel Lisa, France, Spain, Lincolnland, reservation, Fort Laramie Treaty, Star Spangled Banner)
Dakota Pathways Episode 12 - Maps and Borders (Clip) South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1)
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6)

Dakota Pathways: Maps and Borders (Dakota Pathways Resources/ Watch Entire Program) Even before the white man entered the upper mid-west region of the United States, borders have marked the various territories of the people living in the region. With the advancement of the white culture those borders have become less fluid. Even so, the borders of South Dakota have changed with the times. This episode looks at how borders have affected our growth as a state and influenced how we live.

(Verendrye Plate, Indians, Native Americans, French-British War, Louisiana Purchase, War of 1812, Dakota Territory, State Borders, Allotment Act, Homestead Act, of Napoleon Bonaparte, Lewis and Clark, satellites, USGS EROS Data Center, Independence Peace Garden, survey, explorers, cartography, Manuel Lisa, France, Spain, Lincolnland, reservation, Fort Laramie Treaty, Star Spangled Banner)
Dakota Pathways Episode 13 - Big Towns, Little Towns Dakota Pathways Resources

What makes a town grow? What makes a town shrink? Why do some towns form by rivers and others out on the prairie? This episode looks at what has made towns like Sioux Falls and Rapid City grow continuously and why some towns like Detroit SD disappear. It examines the economics of city growth and rural decline throughout our state's history.

(factory, jobs, Government, farming, mining, tourism, ghost town, Dakota Territory, college, university, Aberdeen – Hub City, railroad, Mount Rushmore National Memorial, Aberdeen, Sioux Falls, Pierre, Huron, Watertown, Keystone, niche)
Dakota Pathways Episode 14 - Playing Games Dakota Pathways Resources

Sports have always played a role in the lives of human beings. This was true of the early Native Americans who lived in this region and it was true of our earliest settlers. This program explores the role of sports, both professional and amateur, in our state's history. For a rural state, South Dakota has produced a number of world-class athletes. This episode of Dakota Pathways takes a look at the ins and outs of a wide variety of sports in South Dakota.

(Title Nine, gender, Billy Mills, American Legion Baseball, World Series, Olympics, football, State Championship, baseball, rodeo, Lakota Nations, golf, volleyball, wrestling, Becky Hammon, track, SuAnne Big Crow, sportsmanship, teammate)
Dakota Pathways Episode 15 - Finding a National Voice Dakota Pathways Resources

While South Dakota may be a rural state with a small population, it has always had a national voice. That voice has been in the form of a number of political players in congress and beyond. This episode looks at the likes of Richard Pettigrew, Peter Norbeck, Gertrude Bonnin, Gladys Pyle, Karl Mundt and George McGovern to see just what it means to represent a state in Washington politics. Over the years we have had both liberal and conservative representation. It's politics South Dakota style.

(Potomic Fever, election, Francis Case, Ben Reifel, Larry Pressler, Tom Daschle, Stephanie Herseth, John Thune, Senator, Representative, vote, election, lobbyist, National Council of American Indians, Senate, House of Representatives, Spanish-American War, Legislature, Government, William McKinley, Elsie Meeks, education)
Dakota Pathways Episode 16 - On Vacation Dakota Pathways Resources

What would life in South Dakota be without vacation time? This episode explores how leisure and travel have been entwined with the history of South Dakota from the earliest times. Even in the 1830s visitors "vacationed" here to see our natural wonders. Tourism is the second largest industry in our state. From Mount Rushmore National Memorial to the great lakes on the Missouri, from the lower James River Valley to the lake country of Sisseton, South Dakota is a vacation wonderland. We look at the history of tourism and how it has grown and why.

(leisure, attractions, outdoor sports, recreation, relaxation, work, weekend, Hot Springs, Rapid City, Black Hills, Corn Palace, Mitchell, hunting, fishing, ring-necked pheasant, Game Fish and Parks, fish hatchery, Calvin Coolidge, Gutzon Borglum, Wall Drug Store, Crazy Horse, Korczak Ziolkowski, Black and Yellow Trail, Sioux Falls, Sturgis Motorcycle Rally, Badlands, Oyate Trail, Interstate 90, Interstate 29, Native American, Indian, reservation)
Dakota Pathways Episode 17 - The Home Front Dakota Pathways Resources

During every war in which the citizens of our state participated, there were those who went to war and those who stayed home. But staying home did not mean not supporting our troops. Those who stayed behind contributed to the defense of our country in their own special ways. Some worked in manufacturing plants producing armaments and ammunition, some continued to till the land and produce food for the troops. Children even participated by having newspaper and scrap metal drives. This episode looks at how our citizens participated in the war efforts of our nation "on the home front."

(Geneva Convention, Victory Garden, prisoner of war, Spanish-American War, World War I, World War II, The Great War, Woodrow Wilson, democracy, communism, war to end all wars, reservation, Native American, Indian, war bonds, citizens, Korean War, Vietnam War, rations, Hutterite, Minuteman Missile, ICBM (intercontinental ballistic missile), Berlin Wall, Soviet Union, The Cold War, hot war, balloon bombs, Gulf War, Army, National Guard, Marines, Army Air Corp, Ellsworth Air Force Base, canteen, pheasant sandwich, milk week seed pods)
Dakota Pathways Episode 18 - Cowboys of the Open Range Dakota Pathways Resources

During the late 19th and early 20th Century, as South Dakota grew, first as a Territory and later as a State, there was a major attraction drawing people to the region, other than gold. The vast open prairies of western South Dakota were ideal for raising cattle. In the early days it was the open range, unfenced and vast, that attracted a unique breed of men: Cowboys. Even after the fencing of the plains with the invention of barbed wire, the cowboy life was to continue. This episode looks at the life of the early cowboys on the open range and shows how it helped to make us the state we are today. (chuckwagon, grass, hay, bail, barn, winter, blizzard, brand, fence, cow, graze, molasses, herd, Kyle Evans, Philip, Lemmon, Murdo, grama grass, wheat grass, cattlemen, Grand River, Moreau River, Belle Fourche River, Cheyenne River, Bad River, Native American, Indian, reservation, 1902 Roundup, water, market, Bonanza, devils rope, rodeo, wrangler, night hawk, herder, slaughter, Joseph Glidden)
Dakota Pathways Episode 19 - Telling Stories Dakota Pathways Resources

South Dakota's history is filled with a wide variety of stories to be told and story-tellers to tell them. From Zitkala-Sa (Gertrude Simmons Bonnin) to Laura Ingalls Wilder; from L. Frank Baum, to Virginia Driving Hawk Sneve, South Dakota has been graced with fine authors and great story-tellers. This episode takes a look at several of them and even reenacts some of their stories.

(Jean Patrick, Badger Clark, Native American, Indian, Trickster and the Troll, National Humanities Medal, Little House on the Prairie, Old Indian Days, Charles Eastman, Wizard of Oz, By the Shores of Silver Lake, survey's house, Paul Goble, The Lost Children, Discontented Gopher, Nancy Veglahn, The Buffalo King, Pamela Hill Smith, Ghost House, stories, books, legend, fiction, nonfiction)
Dakota Pathways Episode 19 - Telling Stories (Clip) South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5)

Dakota Pathways: History and Legend (Dakota Pathways Resources/ Watch Entire Program)
South Dakota's history is filled with a wide variety of stories to be told and story-tellers to tell them. From Zitkala-Sa (Gertrude Simmons Bonnin) to Laura Ingalls Wilder; from L. Frank Baum, to Virginia Driving Hawk Sneve, South Dakota has been graced with fine authors and great story-tellers. This episode takes a look at several of them and even reenacts some of their stories.

(Jean Patrick, Badger Clark, Native American, Indian, Trickster and the Troll, National Humanities Medal, Little House on the Prairie, Old Indian Days, Charles Eastman, Wizard of Oz, By the Shores of Silver Lake, survey's house, Paul Goble, The Lost Children, Discontented Gopher, Nancy Veglahn, The Buffalo King, Pamela Hill Smith, Ghost House, stories, books, legend, fiction, nonfiction)
Dakota Pathways Episode 2 - Stories from the Skies Dakota Pathways Resources

This segment takes a look at the history of the state through stories from the skies. It looks at Native American beliefs about the sky, how weather such as blizzards and tornadoes affected settlement and at important people such as George McGovern, Governor Joe Foss and Clyde Ice who were pilots and heroes. From blizzards to sandstorms the sky has always played an important role in shaping our state. It has affected artists and writers, Lakota Medicine Men and common settlers and resulted in many stories from the sky.

(dust, drought, weather, Black Elk, Bear Butte, Noaha-vose, Mato Paha, plane, Explorer II, WWII, EROS)


Dakota Pathways Episode 20 - A Dark Day South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5)
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6)

Dakota Pathways Resources

There is no darker day in South Dakota History than December 29, 1890, the day of the massacre at Wounded Knee. On this dark day, eighty-four Minneconjou men, forty-four women, and eighteen children died on the frozen plains of South Dakota. Thirty-one of the 470 Cavalry soldiers at the scene also died. What led up to this horrible day? Why, were so many women and children slaughtered in what was, at first, called a battle and later became known as a massacre? This episode looks at both sides of the story and tries to make sense of it all. It also looks at what this incident has meant to the Lakota people for the past one-hundred plus years. It does not take sides, but rather, tries to explain the cause and effects of this dark day in our history.

(The Ghost Dance, confrontation, culture, Native American, Indian, dime novels, Richard Pettigrew, Indian Agent, Daniel Royer, Standing Rock, Marie Fox Belly, Lost Bird Society, Little Big Horn, Colonel James W. Forsyth, Ghost Shirt, Ghost Dance, reservation, Cheyenne River, US Army 7th Calvary, Chief Big Foot, Chief Sitting Bull, Pyramid Lake Reservation, Paiute People, September 11th, Twin Towers, traditional, culture, 1973 Wounded Knee, buffalo, Pine Ridge, treaty, war party)
Dakota Pathways Episode 3 - The Mighty Mo' Dakota Pathways Resources

Throughout our history, and even before human habitation, the Missouri River has played a major role in shaping not only the physical geography of the state, but the human geography as well. This episode looks at the many ways the Missouri has impacted human habitation of the state and region. It was the life source for many early Indian tribes, a watery highway for early settlement and exploration. It has also supplied the state with water and energy as it was dammed in the last century for hydropower and irrigation.

(boat, buffalo, pelt, fur trade, Native American, flood, Lewis and Clark, bridge, dam)

Dakota Pathways Episode 4 - East River, West River Dakota Pathways Resources

Even before statehood, the Missouri River has divided the state and her people into two distinct regions, East River and West River. With farming in the east and ranching in the west, South Dakota has always had a split personality. The east is more like the eastern United States and the west river area is more like the wild west. Even the weather changes east to west. More rain in the east makes raising crops easier. Less rain in the west makes raising cattle more common. This program looks at the history of the state and how the east river, west river split has affected the growth of the state.

(meridians, water, planting, hay, harvest, tractor, horse, cowboy, fence, brand, roundup, Native American, Indian, cattle, reservation)
Dakota Pathways Episode 5 - The First Hunters and Farmers NOTE: Not supported by Chrome - Use Explore
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Dakota Pathways Resources

The region we call South Dakota has not always been home to its present population. In very early times, Mammoth Hunters lived and roamed the area. After them came the people of the corn, Paleo-Indian tribes that moved up into the region from Mexico, following the rivers that supplied water for their crops of corn, squash and beans. Later, the Mandan, Arikara and Dakota people moved into the region. This episode looks at our history through the eyes of paleontologists, scientists who explore the past by examining the remains of ancient cultures.

(buffalo, bison, ruins, petroglyphs, artifacts, migration, archeologists, mammoths, pemmican, prehistoric, arrowhead, cache pit)
Dakota Pathways Episode 6 - Mining Booms and Busts NOTE: Not supported by Chrome - Use Explorer
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Dakota Pathways Resources

The white history of South Dakota can be traced over the last century and a half through the booms and busts of the mining industry in the region. Gold was and still is mined in the Black Hills, silver and other minerals have been mined all over the state. Coal, oil and even uranium have been dug out the the ground in our state. These mining pursuits have affect how the state expanded, prospered and failed. In this episode we look at the boom times and the bust times of mining in our state.

(Homestake, quartzite, granite, pavers, cement, miner, settlement, open cut, drifts, shafts, winzes, mucking, stope, quarry)
Dakota Pathways Episode 7 - Water and Dust Dakota Pathways Resources

Much of the settlement of the state can be examined by looking at how water and dust have played a major role in its human occupation. The many rivers in South Dakota, from the small Keya Paha in the south central part of the state, to the Mighty Missouri running through its heart, have provided life giving waters and life taking floods. Too little water also played havoc on human lives. This episode examines the great floods and dust storms as well as the good times when water led to boom years and good crops.

(Dirty Thirties, hydroelectric, dam, spring, artesian well, turbine, Native American, Indian, lake)
Dakota Pathways Episode 8 - History and Legend Dakota Pathways Resources

Much of the history of the state has generated legends and stories of bold adventurers and evil desperadoes. This episode examines the myths and legends and attempts to separate out the true history from the tall tales. Wild Bill Hitchcock, Calamity Jane, Hugh Glass and Jesse James are just a few of the characters investigated in this program.

(Native American, Indian, Enemy Swim, Winyanpaha, Thoen Stone, tall tale)
Dakota Pathways Episode 8 - History and Legend (Clip) South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5)

Dakota Pathways: History and Legend (Dakota Pathways Resources/ Watch Entire Program) Much of the history of the state has generated legends and stories of bold adventurers and evil desperadoes. This episode examines the myths and legends and attempts to separate out the true history from the tall tales. Wild Bill Hitchcock, Calamity Jane, Hugh Glass and Jesse James are just a few of the characters investigated in this program.

(Native American, Indian, Enemy Swim, Winyanpaha, Thoen Stone, tall tale)
Dakota Pathways Episode 9 - People of the Bison South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7)

Dakota Pathways Resources

The Lakota, Nakota and Dakota people have long made this region of the country home. The bison or buffalo played a major role in their lives. From the buffalo they got hides for their teepees, bones for their tools and meat for their food. And even spirit for their souls. As the bison migrated in the great circle of life, so did the people. They were, after all, people of the bison.

(Piece Pipe, Crazy Horse, Red Cloud, Powwow, warrior, Sioux, starvation, segregation, reservation, agencies, Native American, Indian, Hunter, Scotty Philip)
Deadwood Songbook (Click Website in Description) (Website) A history project of Deadwood's Adams Museum, includes photo gallery, interviews, bonus video and more.
Detailed Cow Eye Dissection (Jr. High, High School and College Review) Cow Eye dissection for educational use: additional video, lesson plans, quizzes, additional dissections and more available at SDPB.org. The video details the external and internal anatomy of a cow eye.

(Cow eye, coweye, phylum, vertebrate, PBS Affiliate, pbs, Dissection, best dissection, lab activity ,SDPB, DSU, EDU, edu, College, high, gov, GOV, school, middle school, dissection, Biology, Zoology, Anatomy, sight, cool dissection, iris, pupil, retina, detached retina, lens, choroid coat, tapetum lucidum, cornea, vitreous humor, suspensory ligaments, sclera, cones, rods, optic nerve, eye ball, beef eye, university, Dakota State University, South Dakota Public Broadcasting)
Detailed Crayfish Dissection (Jr. High, High School and College Review) Crayfish dissection for educational use: additional video, lesson plans, quizzes, additional dissections and more available at SDPB.org. The video details the external anatomy of a crayfish.

(Crawfish, crawdads, arthropod, segmented body, exoskeleton, Crustacean, phylum, invertebrate, PBS Affiliate ,pbs , Dissection, freshwater, best dissection, lab activity, SDPB, DSU, EDU, edu, College, high school, middle school, dissection, Biology, Zoology, Anatomy, cool dissection, crayfish dissection, gills, appendages, pyloric stomach, cardiac stomach, digestive glands, green glans, adrenal glands, uropod, carapace, university, Dakota State University, South Dakota Public Broadcasting)
Detailed Sea star (starfish) Dissection (Jr. High, High School and College Review) Sea star dissection for educational use: additional video, lesson plans, quizzes, additional dissections and more available at SDPB.org. The video details the external anatomy of a sea star.

(Sea star, seastar, starfish, Echinoderms, spiny skin, radial symmetry, dermal internal skeleton, phylum, invertebrate, PBS Affiliate ,pbs , Dissection, saltwater, best dissection, lab activity, SDPB, DSU, EDU, edu, College, high school, middle school, dissection, Biology, Zoology, Anatomy, cool dissection, starfish dissection, seastar dissection, sea star dissection, pyloric cecum, cardiac stomach, pyloric stomach, digestive glands, madreporite plate, ring cannel, stone cannel, radial canal, ampulla, tube feet, tubefeet, clam, gonads, university, Dakota State University, South Dakota Public Broadcasting)
Detailed Sheep Heart Dissection (Jr. High, High School and College Review) Sheep heart dissection for educational use: additional video, lesson plans, quizzes, additional dissections and more available at SDPB.org. The video details the external and internal anatomy of a sheep heart.

(Sheep heart, beef heart, Animalia, vertebrate, Dissection, best dissection, lab activity, DSU, EDU, edu, gov, GOV, middle school, dissection, Biology, Zoology, Anatomy, heart attack, cool dissection, bicuspid valve, tricuspid valve, atria, atrium, ventricle, ventricles, aorta, semilunar valves, pulmonary artery, superior vena cava, inferior vena cava, university, Dakota State University, South Dakota Public Broadcasting, chordae tendineae, mitral valve, PBS, heartbeat)
Dissection 101: Clam Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(Lesson Plans)
Clam - Lesson plan (with time codes), quiz and an interactive PowerPoint avaliable at the link above.

Dissection 101: Clam PowerPoint Test
Dissection 101: Earthworm Dissection Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(Lesson Plans)
Earthworm Dissection - Lesson plan (with time codes), quiz and an interactive PowerPoint avaliable at the link above.

Dissection Media Media for dissection series - low right.
Dissection Media for Cow Eye Dissection Media for cow eye dissection – lower left.

***********You will be prompted to either “Open” or “Save” the media. Please select “Save” to dramatically save downloading time.***********
E. Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing - Cube Subtraction Video - Cube Subtraction: Artist Dick Termes creates objects from cubes by removing cubic spaces from the original cube. An animated video reveals examples of these results in the real world.

Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing is a multi-part video series featuring South Dakota artist Dick Termes teaching basic drawing techniques. Resources available for the project are described in the following Teaching and User’s Guide and are available at PBS Learning Media. The series includes more than five hours of content in 20 individual videos (Preview), activities, a teacher’s guide and lesson plans that could be integrated into classrooms of all kinds or for use at home.
Early Child and TIE Conferences Activities for Conferences
Earthworm Dissection: Student Cut #1 for Lesson Plan Student Cut #1 - Earthworm dissection for educational use: lesson plans, quizzes, additional dissections and more available at SDPB.org

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(Earth, Worm, YouTube, PBS Affiliate, Dissection, earthworm, Earthworm, earth worm, best dissection, demo, lab activity, Demonstrations, SDPB, DSU, Dakota State University, EDU, edu, College dissection, Biology, Zoology, Anatomy, science, worm, worm dissection, cool dissection, dissection video, earthworm dissection, dissection of an earthworm, dissections for teachers, Annelida, Clitellum, best, Review, Collection, teacher, educator, lesson, lesson plan)

Earthworm Dissection: Student Cut #2 for Lesson Plan Student Cut #2 - Earthworm dissection for educational use: lesson plans, quizzes, additional dissections and more available at SDPB.org

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(Earth, Worm, YouTube, PBS Affiliate, Dissection, earthworm, Earthworm, earth worm, best dissection, demo, lab activity, Demonstrations, SDPB, DSU, Dakota State University, EDU, edu, College dissection, Biology, Zoology, Anatomy, science, worm, worm dissection, cool dissection, dissection video, earthworm dissection, dissection of an earthworm, dissections for teachers, Annelida, Clitellum, best, Review, Collection, teacher, educator, lesson, lesson plan)
Earthworm Dissection: Student Cut #3 for Lesson Plan Student Cut #3 - Earthworm dissection for educational use: lesson plans, quizzes, additional dissections and more available at SDPB.org

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(Earth, Worm, YouTube, PBS Affiliate, Dissection, earthworm, Earthworm, earth worm, best dissection, demo, lab activity, Demonstrations, SDPB, DSU, Dakota State University, EDU, edu, College dissection, Biology, Zoology, Anatomy, science, worm, worm dissection, cool dissection, dissection video, earthworm dissection, dissection of an earthworm, dissections for teachers, Annelida, Clitellum, best, Review, Collection, teacher, educator, lesson, lesson plan)
Easy Earth-Friendly Crafts in 5 Steps Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Easy Earth-Friendly Crafts in 5 Steps (SD Library Search) by Anna Llimos, Enslow Publishers - Hello… It is your friend Buddy. I have a quiz for you. What can you use to make a pig, a worm and a firefighter?... Recyclables, read Easy Earth-Friendly Crafts in 5 Steps to find out more.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

Ecosystems, Conservation, Habitats and Outdoor Activities (Activities Only, PDF Lower Left) (Activities Only, PDF Lower Left)

Ecosystems, Conservation, Habitats and Outdoor Activities - Resources for classroom and home use, including activity ideas, video, guidebooks and more.
Emergencies Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Emergencies (SD Library Search) by Nancy Loewen, The Child’s World - Do you know what to do if someone in your family gets hurt at the park, in your house or at the pool? If you don’t, then check out the book Emergencies to keep yourself and others safe.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Evolution of Wajaje-Cokatowela Shirts (Power Point Presentation) Power Point Presentation - Evolution of Wajaje-Cokatowela Shirts, Victor Douville, Sinte Gleska University

“Click” Evolution of Wajaje Cokatowela Shirts.pps (lower left in the table below the player) **NOTE** The presentation downloads very slowly if you choose "Open". Please select "Save", and save the PowerPoint presentation to your desktop for a quick download.

Winter Count Lessons

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6)
F. Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing - Cube Realism Video - Cube Realism: Artist Dick Termes uses the techniques from the earlier videos to draw a realistic cityscape. An animated video reveals several forms being drawn as well as real world objects created from cubes. The video focuses on how Dick draws a cityscape.

Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing is a multi-part video series featuring South Dakota artist Dick Termes teaching basic drawing techniques. Resources available for the project are described in the following Teaching and User’s Guide and are available at PBS Learning Media. The series includes more than five hours of content in 20 individual videos (Preview), activities, a teacher’s guide and lesson plans that could be integrated into classrooms of all kinds or for use at home.
Firehouse! Firehouse!

Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Firehouse! (SD Library Search) by Mark Teague, Orchard Books - Hello Buddy here! It is time for Buddy’s Book Club! Have you ever heard of firedogs? I haven’t either, but 6 of them just drove by in a fire truck! Read Firehouse! to find out more.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

Fossils, Minerals and Mining (Activities Only, PDF Lower Left) (Activities Only, PDF Lower Left)

Fossils, Minerals and Mining - Resources for classroom and home use, including activity ideas, video, guidebooks and more.
Frog Dissection: Part I (Exterior) Frog Dissection Video (Part 1 of 2) - This video details the external anatomy of a frog. Additional videos, lesson plans, quizzes, additional dissections, and more available at SDPB.org. (Part II)
Frog Dissection: Part II (Interior) Frog Dissection Video (Part 2 of 2) - This video details the internal anatomy of a frog. Additional videos, lesson plans, quizzes, additional dissections, and more available at SDPB.org. (Part I)

Fun with Espanol 101 Vowels/Home Teachers Guide

The study of a foreign language in the primary grades encourages acute listening skills,organization, problem solving, and imagination. Exploration and greater understanding of other cultures is an inherent part of foreign language study. This series develops these skills while introducing conversational Spanish to children who have never spoken the language. The format includes familiar settings, simple songs, and easy crafts to help make learning fun. The series is designed so that even teachers without any Spanish language skills can still use it.

Spanish.
Fun with Espanol 102 School/Telling Time Teachers Guide

The study of a foreign language in the primary grades encourages acute listening skills,organization, problem solving, and imagination. Exploration and greater understanding of other cultures is an inherent part of foreign language study. This series develops these skills while introducing conversational Spanish to children who have never spoken the language. The format includes familiar settings, simple songs, and easy crafts to help make learning fun. The series is designed so that even teachers without any Spanish language skills can still use it.

Spanish.
Fun with Espanol 103 Family Teachers Guide

The study of a foreign language in the primary grades encourages acute listening skills,organization, problem solving, and imagination. Exploration and greater understanding of other cultures is an inherent part of foreign language study. This series develops these skills while introducing conversational Spanish to children who have never spoken the language. The format includes familiar settings, simple songs, and easy crafts to help make learning fun. The series is designed so that even teachers without any Spanish language skills can still use it.

Spanish.
Fun with Espanol 104 Farm/Colors Teachers Guide

The study of a foreign language in the primary grades encourages acute listening skills,organization, problem solving, and imagination. Exploration and greater understanding of other cultures is an inherent part of foreign language study. This series develops these skills while introducing conversational Spanish to children who have never spoken the language. The format includes familiar settings, simple songs, and easy crafts to help make learning fun. The series is designed so that even teachers without any Spanish language skills can still use it.

Spanish.
Fun with Espanol 105 Clothing Teachers Guide

The study of a foreign language in the primary grades encourages acute listening skills,organization, problem solving, and imagination. Exploration and greater understanding of other cultures is an inherent part of foreign language study. This series develops these skills while introducing conversational Spanish to children who have never spoken the language. The format includes familiar settings, simple songs, and easy crafts to help make learning fun. The series is designed so that even teachers without any Spanish language skills can still use it.
Spanish.
Fun with Espanol 107 Days of the Week Teachers Guide

The study of a foreign language in the primary grades encourages acute listening skills,organization, problem solving, and imagination. Exploration and greater understanding of other cultures is an inherent part of foreign language study. This series develops these skills while introducing conversational Spanish to children who have never spoken the language. The format includes familiar settings, simple songs, and easy crafts to help make learning fun. The series is designed so that even teachers without any Spanish language skills can still use it.

Spanish.
Fun with Espanol 108 Review Teachers Guide

The study of a foreign language in the primary grades encourages acute listening skills,organization, problem solving, and imagination. Exploration and greater understanding of other cultures is an inherent part of foreign language study. This series develops these skills while introducing conversational Spanish to children who have never spoken the language. The format includes familiar settings, simple songs, and easy crafts to help make learning fun. The series is designed so that even teachers without any Spanish language skills can still use it.

Spanish.
G. Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing - Cylinder Basic Video - Cylinder Basic: Artist Dick Termes introduces cylinders and how to draw them in space with an artistic angle so that you can see dimensions. An animated video shows many examples of cylinders in the real world.

Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing is a multi-part video series featuring South Dakota artist Dick Termes teaching basic drawing techniques. Resources available for the project are described in the following Teaching and User’s Guide and are available at PBS Learning Media. The series includes more than five hours of content in 20 individual videos (Preview), activities, a teacher’s guide and lesson plans that could be integrated into classrooms of all kinds or for use at home
Geography in US History 110 - The Origin and Development of NATO Geography in US History
110. The Origin and Development of NATO (1945: 1991)

Investigate the relationship between geography and history. Demonstrate how knowledge of geography contributes to historical understanding, and develop historical and geographical literacy. Help students place historical events and trends in the contexts of time and place, utilizing fundamental geographic themes as organizing principles. Provide students with the perspectives, information, concepts, and skills essential to understanding significant historical developments from 1787 to the present.
20-minutes
Geography in US History 101 - North vs South Geography in US
History 101. North v. South in the Founding of the USA 1786-1796

Investigate the relationship between geography and history. Demonstrate how knowledge of geography contributes to historical understanding, and develop historical and geographical literacy. Help students place historical events and trends in the contexts of time and place, utilizing fundamental geographic themes as organizing principles. Provide students with the perspectives, information, concepts, and skills essential to understanding significant historical developments from 1787 to the present.
20-minute episodes
Geography in US History 102 - Jefferson Decides to Purchase Louisiana Geography in US History
102. Jefferson Decides to Purchase Louisiana (1801: 1813)

Investigate the relationship between geography and history. Demonstrate how knowledge of geography contributes to historical understanding, and develop historical and geographical literacy. Help students place historical events and trends in the contexts of time and place, utilizing fundamental geographic themes as organizing principles. Provide students with the perspectives, information, concepts, and skills essential to understanding significant historical developments from 1787 to the present.
20-minutes
Geography in US History 103 - Civil War and Social Change in Georgia Geography in US History
103. Civil War and Social Change in Georgia (1860: 1870)

Investigate the relationship between geography and history. Demonstrate how knowledge of geography contributes to historical understanding, and develop historical and geographical literacy. Help students place historical events and trends in the contexts of time and place, utilizing fundamental geographic themes as organizing principles. Provide students with the perspectives, information, concepts, and skills essential to understanding significant historical developments from 1787 to the present.
20-minutes
Geography in US History 104 - Clash of Cultures on the Great Plains Geography in US History
104. Clash of Cultures on the Great Plains (1865: 1890)

Investigate the relationship between geography and history. Demonstrate how knowledge of geography contributes to historical understanding, and develop historical and geographical literacy. Help students place historical events and trends in the contexts of time and place, utilizing fundamental geographic themes as organizing principles. Provide students with the perspectives, information, concepts, and skills essential to understanding significant historical developments from 1787 to the present.
20-minutes
Geography in US History 105 - An Industrial Revolution in Pittsburgh Geography in US History
105. An Industrial Revolution in Pittsburgh (1865: 1900)

Investigate the relationship between geography and history. Demonstrate how knowledge of geography contributes to historical understanding, and develop historical and geographical literacy. Help students place historical events and trends in the contexts of time and place, utilizing fundamental geographic themes as organizing principles. Provide students with the perspectives, information, concepts, and skills essential to understanding significant historical developments from 1787 to the present.
20-minutes
Geography in US History 106 - Americans Build the Panama Canal Geography in US History
106. Americans Build the Panama Canal (1901: 1914)

Investigate the relationship between geography and history. Demonstrate how knowledge of geography contributes to historical understanding, and develop historical and geographical literacy. Help students place historical events and trends in the contexts of time and place, utilizing fundamental geographic themes as organizing principles. Provide students with the perspectives, information, concepts, and skills essential to understanding significant historical developments from 1787 to the present.
20-minutes
Geography in US History 107 - The Chinese-American Experience Geography in US History
107. A Nation of Immigrants: The Chinese-American Experience (1850: 1990)

Investigate the relationship between geography and history. Demonstrate how knowledge of geography contributes to historical understanding, and develop historical and geographical literacy. Help students place historical events and trends in the contexts of time and place, utilizing fundamental geographic themes as organizing principles. Provide students with the perspectives, information, concepts, and skills essential to understanding significant historical developments from 1787 to the present.
20-minutes
Geography in US History 108 - Moving North to Chicago Geography in US History
108. Moving North to Chicago (1900: 1945)

Investigate the relationship between geography and history. Demonstrate how knowledge of geography contributes to historical understanding, and develop historical and geographical literacy. Help students place historical events and trends in the contexts of time and place, utilizing fundamental geographic themes as organizing principles. Provide students with the perspectives, information, concepts, and skills essential to understanding significant historical developments from 1787 to the present.
20-minutes
Geography in US History 109 - New Deal for the Dust Bowl Geography in US History
109. New Deal for the Dust Bowl (1931: 1945)

Investigate the relationship between geography and history. Demonstrate how knowledge of geography contributes to historical understanding, and develop historical and geographical literacy. Help students place historical events and trends in the contexts of time and place, utilizing fundamental geographic themes as organizing principles. Provide students with the perspectives, information, concepts, and skills essential to understanding significant historical developments from 1787 to the present.
20-minutes
Geology of the Badlands *Lesson Plans/Teacher Resources
*Curriculum Materials
*Website
*Badlands Photostream
*SDPB - The Badlands: Nature's Time Capsule (Documentary)

The Badlands are well known for their amazing scenery. The rugged Badlands wall, towering spires and deep canyons offer plenty of breathtaking views. But how did the Badlands form? The simple explanation lies in two geologic processes: Deposition & Erosion.

Deposition began 75 million years ago when the Western Interior Seaway covered what is now the Great Plains. Over time, the mud of the deeply buried sea floor hardened into shale. When the Rocky Mountains rose, the ancient sea retreated. Today paleontologists find fossils of clams, ammonites, and marine reptiles in the Pierre Shale.

Once the water was gone, the sea floor was exposed to air. Plants grew and ancient animals roamed the land. The exposed mud weathered into a tropical soil. The Yellow Mounds are evidence of this ancient ecosystem.

Next we have the rolling gray hills of the Chadron Formation. At this time, the environment was still warm and humid. Huge meandering rivers carried tons of sediment from the Black Hills. The sediment was deposited here because this area was once a low point, a geologic basin.

From 34 to 30 million years ago, the climate shifted from sub-tropical to cooler and drier. River channels and wind-blown sediments deposited the Brule formation. As the rivers flooded -- sand, silt, and mud piled up. Many fossils from the “Golden Age of Mammals” such as ancient rhinos, horses, and saber tooth cats are preserved in these layers.

The very highest peaks in the Badlands are the Sharps Formation. The Rockyford Ash came from huge volcanic eruptions to the West. As the ash erodes, it forms bentonite clay, which makes the badlands mud very sticky

An ancient sea, rivers, flood plains, and wind-blown volcanic ash deposited sediment here 75 to 25 million years ago. Eventually those sediments hardened into sedimentary rock layers. But that is only part of the story. Today the forces of erosion shape the Badlands. Starting approximately 500,000 years ago, modern rivers began to cut down into the prairie, carving the Badlands. Different rock types erode at different rates. Harder rocks like sandstone and limestone erode slower then softer rocks like mudstone. This mix of rock types causes dramatic rock formations such as windows, balancing rocks, and mushroom shaped hoodoos.

Deposition and Erosion – Those two powerful forces have shaped the Badlands landscape over millions of years. Enjoy the scenery today as you continue to learn more about its geologic past.

H. Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing - Cylinder Addition Video - Cylinder Addition: Artist Dick Termes adds cylinders together to create more complex objects. An animated video shows examples in the real world of objects composed of combined cylinders.

Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing is a multi-part video series featuring South Dakota artist Dick Termes teaching basic drawing techniques. Resources available for the project are described in the following Teaching and User’s Guide and are available at PBS Learning Media. The series includes more than five hours of content in 20 individual videos (Preview), activities, a teacher’s guide and lesson plans that could be integrated into classrooms of all kinds or for use at home.
Head To Toe 101 - In the Beginning Head to Toe 101. In the Beginning.
Analyzes the process by which a special cell inside a mother's body grows into an embryo, a fetus, and then a newborn baby. Explains why babies need special care.

Introduce the workings of the human body to children in early elementary grades. Develop students' knowledge and the attitudes and practices needed to achieve and maintain good health. Encourage the avoidance of risky health behaviors, and reinforce existing positive health habits. Head to Toe builds upon children's natural interest in how the body looks, works, breaks down, heals, and grows. Use this series to emphasize children's personal involvement in achieving and maintaining their own good health.

15-minute episodes
Head to Toe 102 - Cells, Your Starting Place Head to Toe
102. Cells, Your Starting Place. Explains how all plants, animals, and people are made up of different kinds of cells. Discovers how cells contain genes, which are inherited from parents and carry a different blueprint for each living thing.

Introduce the workings of the human body to children in early elementary grades. Develop students' knowledge and the attitudes and practices needed to achieve and maintain good health. Encourage the avoidance of risky health behaviors, and reinforce existing positive health habits. Head to Toe builds upon children's natural interest in how the body looks, works, breaks down, heals, and grows. Use this series to emphasize children's personal involvement in achieving and maintaining their own good health.
15-minute episodes
Head to Toe 103 - In a Heartbeat Head To Toe
103. In a Heartbeat. Illustrates the functions of the heart and blood. Explores activities that keep the heart healthy.

Introduce the workings of the human body to children in early elementary grades. Develop students' knowledge and the attitudes and practices needed to achieve and maintain good health. Encourage the avoidance of risky health behaviors, and reinforce existing positive health habits. Head to Toe builds upon children's natural interest in how the body looks, works, breaks down, heals, and grows. Use this series to emphasize children's personal involvement in achieving and maintaining their own good health.
15-minute episodes
Head To Toe 104 - Muscles, Holding You Together Head To Toe
104. Muscles, Holding You Together. Shows how muscles help bodies move and do many different things. Teaches why muscles need exercise.

Introduce the workings of the human body to children in early elementary grades. Develop students' knowledge and the attitudes and practices needed to achieve and maintain good health. Encourage the avoidance of risky health behaviors, and reinforce existing positive health habits. Head to Toe builds upon children's natural interest in how the body looks, works, breaks down, heals, and grows. Use this series to emphasize children's personal involvement in achieving and maintaining their own good health.
15-minute episodes
Head to Toe 105 - Standing Tall Head To Toe
105. Standing Tall. Examines how the skeleton, bones, and joints support and protect a body and give it shape. Investigates activities that help keep bones strong, healthy, and safe.

Introduce the workings of the human body to children in early elementary grades. Develop students' knowledge and the attitudes and practices needed to achieve and maintain good health. Encourage the avoidance of risky health behaviors, and reinforce existing positive health habits. Head to Toe builds upon children's natural interest in how the body looks, works, breaks down, heals, and grows. Use this series to emphasize children's personal involvement in achieving and maintaining their own good health.
15-minute episodes
Head To Toe 106 - Fueling Up Head To Toe
106. Fueling Up. Shows how food becomes fuel for bodies and how to choose a variety of healthful foods.

Introduce the workings of the human body to children in early elementary grades. Develop students' knowledge and the attitudes and practices needed to achieve and maintain good health. Encourage the avoidance of risky health behaviors, and reinforce existing positive health habits. Head to Toe builds upon children's natural interest in how the body looks, works, breaks down, heals, and grows. Use this series to emphasize children's personal involvement in achieving and maintaining their own good health.
15-minute episodes
Head to Toe 107 - From Fuel to Waste Head To Toe
107. From Fuel to Waste. Explains how people and other living things make solid and liquid waste that must be eliminated from the body. Identifies foods that aid in eliminating waste.

Introduce the workings of the human body to children in early elementary grades. Develop students' knowledge and the attitudes and practices needed to achieve and maintain good health. Encourage the avoidance of risky health behaviors, and reinforce existing positive health habits. Head to Toe builds upon children's natural interest in how the body looks, works, breaks down, heals, and grows. Use this series to emphasize children's personal involvement in achieving and maintaining their own good health.
15-minute episodes
Head to Toe 108 - Fresh Air Head To Toe
108. Fresh Air. Examines how the air we breathe into our lungs contains oxygen, which a body must have to stay alive. Considers ways to keep lungs healthy.

Introduce the workings of the human body to children in early elementary grades. Develop students' knowledge and the attitudes and practices needed to achieve and maintain good health. Encourage the avoidance of risky health behaviors, and reinforce existing positive health habits. Head to Toe builds upon children's natural interest in how the body looks, works, breaks down, heals, and grows. Use this series to emphasize children's personal involvement in achieving and maintaining their own good health.
15-minute episodes
Head to Toe 109 - Control Center Head To Toe
109. Control Center. Studies how the brain uses messages from the five senses to think, learn, and remember. Studies how to protect the brain.

Introduce the workings of the human body to children in early elementary grades. Develop students' knowledge and the attitudes and practices needed to achieve and maintain good health. Encourage the avoidance of risky health behaviors, and reinforce existing positive health habits. Head to Toe builds upon children's natural interest in how the body looks, works, breaks down, heals, and grows. Use this series to emphasize children's personal involvement in achieving and maintaining their own good health.
15-minute episodes
Head to Toe 110 - Fighting Germs and Diseases Head To Toe
110. Fighting Germs and Diseases. Analyzes how germs can enter the body and make someone sick. Shows how to avoid harmful germs.

Introduce the workings of the human body to children in early elementary grades. Develop students' knowledge and the attitudes and practices needed to achieve and maintain good health. Encourage the avoidance of risky health behaviors, and reinforce existing positive health habits. Head to Toe builds upon children's natural interest in how the body looks, works, breaks down, heals, and grows. Use this series to emphasize children's personal involvement in achieving and maintaining their own good health.
15-minute episodes
Head to Toe 111 - Sounds Head To Toe
111. Sounds. Explores how ears work and how loud sounds can damage ears. Focuses on ways to protect hearing.

Introduce the workings of the human body to children in early elementary grades. Develop students' knowledge and the attitudes and practices needed to achieve and maintain good health. Encourage the avoidance of risky health behaviors, and reinforce existing positive health habits. Head to Toe builds upon children's natural interest in how the body looks, works, breaks down, heals, and grows. Use this series to emphasize children's personal involvement in achieving and maintaining their own good health.
15-minute episodes
Head to Toe 112 - Sights Head To Toe
112. Sights. Illustrates how eyes work and how they are protected. Shows how to protect vision.

Introduce the workings of the human body to children in early elementary grades. Develop students' knowledge and the attitudes and practices needed to achieve and maintain good health. Encourage the avoidance of risky health behaviors, and reinforce existing positive health habits. Head to Toe builds upon children's natural interest in how the body looks, works, breaks down, heals, and grows. Use this series to emphasize children's personal involvement in achieving and maintaining their own good health.
15-minute episodes
Head To Toe 113 - A Healthy Smile Head To Toe
113. A Healthy Smile. Explains how and why baby teeth are replaced by permanent teeth. Demonstrates actions to help keep teeth healthy.

Introduce the workings of the human body to children in early elementary grades. Develop students' knowledge and the attitudes and practices needed to achieve and maintain good health. Encourage the avoidance of risky health behaviors, and reinforce existing positive health habits. Head to Toe builds upon children's natural interest in how the body looks, works, breaks down, heals, and grows. Use this series to emphasize children's personal involvement in achieving and maintaining their own good health.
15-minute episodes
Head To Toe 114 - Staying Healthy Head To Toe
114. Staying Healthy. Investigates how children can promote their own health. Teaches to recognize and describe accomplishments and to determine why healthy choices are best.

Introduce the workings of the human body to children in early elementary grades. Develop students' knowledge and the attitudes and practices needed to achieve and maintain good health. Encourage the avoidance of risky health behaviors, and reinforce existing positive health habits. Head to Toe builds upon children's natural interest in how the body looks, works, breaks down, heals, and grows. Use this series to emphasize children's personal involvement in achieving and maintaining their own good health.

15-minute episodes
Head To Toe 115 - Safety First Head To Toe
115. Safety First. Shows how to keep safe at home and away from home. Describes what it means to be responsible for one's own safety.


Introduce the workings of the human body to children in early elementary grades. Develop students' knowledge and the attitudes and practices needed to achieve and maintain good health. Encourage the avoidance of risky health behaviors, and reinforce existing positive health habits. Head to Toe builds upon children's natural interest in how the body looks, works, breaks down, heals, and grows. Use this series to emphasize children's personal involvement in achieving and maintaining their own good health.

15-minute episodes
Henry and the Bully Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Henry and the Bully (SD Library Search) by Nancy Carlson, Viking - It is time for Buddy’s Book Club. Bullies make me sad because they hurt people. My friend Henry doesn’t like going to school because Sam is picking on him. Read Henry and the Bully to see how Henry and the bully become friends.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
HRAAS1 HRAAS1
HRAAS2 HRAAS2
HRAS1 HRAS1
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Huron PBS LM Training Training PBS LM
I. Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing - Cylinder Subtraction Video - Cylinder Subtraction: Artist Dick Termes creates objects from cylinders by removing cubic spaces from the original cylinder. An animated video reveals examples of these results in the real world.

Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing is a multi-part video series featuring South Dakota artist Dick Termes teaching basic drawing techniques. Resources available for the project are described in the following Teaching and User’s Guide and are available at PBS Learning Media. The series includes more than five hours of content in 20 individual videos (Preview), activities, a teacher’s guide and lesson plans that could be integrated into classrooms of all kinds or for use at home.
Identifying Word Parts to Understand the Meanings of Words Identifying Word Parts to Understand the Meanings of Words - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshop 2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(OSEUS, OSEU)
Images of the Past - A Russian Grand Duke, Gen. Custer, Traditional use of Tatanka (buffalo) Educational Resources (Also lower Left - PDF)

During this activity your students will learn about the traditional use of buffalo parts and their location on the buffalo. They will also learn about a time when the Tsar of Russia contacted American President U.S. Grant in an effort to build a stronger relationship between the two nations. IOTP
Images of the Past - Build It: Scale Images of the Past - Build It: Scale Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDFs)

During this activity your students will construct 3 “scaled” models of the Flick Cabin in Custer, SD. This is a perfect engineering/math activity for an afterschool group, club or elementary class. IOTP
Images of the Past - Capacity: Gallon, Quart and More Capacity: Gallon, Quart and More Activity (Also lower Left - PDF)

During this activity your students will participate in a hands-on activity in which they will practice using customary units of measure for capacity (volume), including gallons, quarts, cups, liters and more. Your students will also learn about the dams on the Missouri River, including the Oahe Dam which has the 4th largest reservoir in the United States.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Images of the Past - Ellsworth Air Force Base: Construction & 44th Missile Wing Bernoulli's: Flight/Lift? Educational Resources (Also lower Left - PDF)

This lab write-up includes many demonstrations that highlight Bernoulli’s Principle. The lab write-up starts with flight/lift and continues with additional related demonstrations. Each section includes a small explanation and related video lesson. A detailed explanation of Bernoulli’s Principle, with related web resources (flight, airfoils, forces, etc.), is also included.
Images of the Past - History Blog Images of the Past: History Blog Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDFs)

During this activity your students will review many blogs entries. Then your students will write a historical blog about an event that took place in your community. Your students will also learn about the career of Jessie Yuill Sundstrom, whose papers, photographs and manuscript collection detail an incredible lifelong commitment to Black Hills history. IOTP

Images of the Past - I-Spy: That’s Not My Habitat I-Spy: That’s Not My Habitat Educational Resources (Also lower Left - PDF)

During this activity your students will participate in a hands-on observation/habitat challenge. Your students will also learn about Horatio Ross, who discovered gold in 1874 on French Creek near what is now Custer, SD.
Images of the Past - Pheasant: Take Aim, Focus, Draw Pheasant: Take Aim, Focus, Draw Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDF)

During this activity your students will learn about the sport of bird watching, which is one of America’s favorite pastimes with more than 50 million birders enjoying the activity in the United States. Your students will learn basic bird watching techniques, like the best time during the day to view birds and how to select the correct location. Then your students will draw a picture of a bird they viewed and/or make a digital photo album for their computer desktop. (Images of the Past Online)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Images of the Past - Presidential Visits to South Dakota: Calvin Coolidge South Dakota - Visits by the Presidents Educational Resources (Also lower Left - PDF)

President Calvin Coolidge and Mrs. Calvin Coolidge spent the summer of 1927 in the Black Hills and made Custer State Park the “Summer White House”, the whole territory turned out to make this the finest vacation anyone could possibly enjoy. IOTP

Images of the Past - Spearfish Main Street - 1913 Spearfish Main Street - 1913 Educational Resources (Also lower Left - PDF)

Film shot in 1913 shows Spearfish Main Street looking north from Hudson Street. The film was likely shot as a promotion for the town, and the street scene was probably intended to show how busy and prosperous the community was. At the time, Spearfish had a population of about 1100 people. The film shows cars and other motorized vehicles. A few horses can be seen, including a horse pulling a wagon across from east to west across Main Street traffic.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Images of the Past - The Hot Springs Mammoth Site: How the Site was Discovered NOTE: Not supported by Chrome - use Explorer
or
Watch on PBS

George Hanson and son Dan Hanson, describe the find.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Images of the Past - The Hot Springs Mammoth Site: Original Exploration NOTE: Not supported by Chrome - Use Explorer
or
Watch on PBS

Dr. Agenbroad, Chief Scientist, Site Director describes the original exploration of the site.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Images of the Past - The Men Who Made Rushmore The Men Who Made Rushmore Educational Resources (Also lower Left - PDF)

Excerpts from the 1992 documentary "The Men Who Made Rushmore" combine film shot during the carving of Mount Rushmore with Interviews of workers fifty years after the project came to an end. The men describe some of the equipment and techniques they used and talk about what it was like to work on the Monument. A survivor of one of the few serious accidents during the 14-years of carving talks about what happened.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Images of the Past - Trick Rider Mattie Goff at the 1927 Faith, SD Rodeo Rodeo: An Abstract Look Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDF)

During this activity your students will create an abstract painting or drawing using lines, forms, textures, shapes, color, etc. Your students will select an event in the video and recreate the mood/feeling by creating the abstract piece.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Images of the Past - Wind Cave: Formation The Senses: Smell, Touch, Hearing and More! Activity (Also lower Left - PDF)

During this activity your students will participate in a hands-on activity in which they will explore their senses, including their sense of touch, smell, hearing, sight and taste. Your students will also learn about the formation of caves in the Black Hills.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Images of the Past - Wind Cave: History The Senses: Smell, Touch, Hearing and More! Activity (Also lower Left - PDF)

During this activity your students will participate in a hands-on activity in which they will explore their senses, including their sense of touch, smell, hearing, sight and taste. Your students will also learn about the formation of caves in the Black Hills.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Images of the Past - Wind Study: For a Lifetime Wind Study: For a Lifetime Educational Resources (Also lower Left - PDF)

Wind Study: For a Lifetime

During this activity your students will learn about two 1930s balloon flights launched near Rapid City that provided invaluable scientific data about the nature of the Earth's atmosphere at the edge of space, also setting an altitude record that would stand for 21 years. The students will then participate in a qualitative wind speed study. IOTP
Images of the Past | Controlling Density: Ballast Tank Images of the Past | Controlling Density: Ballast Tank Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDFs)

During this activity your students will learn about the process in which submarines use ballast tanks to change their density resulting in ascending and descending in water. They will also learn about the sinking of the American naval ship, the USS Maine, on February 15, 1898. IOTP

density, household items, investigate, inquire, hands-on activity, sink, float, experiment, construct, weight, volume, kitchen, Archimedes, submarine, ballast tanks, ascending, descending, water, USS Maine, Camp Dewey, Spanish-American War
Images of the Past | Density Investigation - Team Boat Density Investigation - Team Boat Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDF)

During this activity, your students will learn about the launching of the 35,000-ton Battleship South Dakota in 1941. Then they will complete an activity in which they will learn about density, and how the buoyant force floats a very massive ship. (Images of the Past Online)
Images of the Past | Density: Just Right Images of the Past | Density: Just Right Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDFs)

During this hands-on activity your students will complete one or more tasks in which they will use household items to investigate density. They will gather data to establish the point at which a sealed container floats, hovers and sinks in water. Then they will use the data to hover a container (submarine) with a given amount of additional cargo. IOTP

density, household items, investigate, inquire, hands-on activity, sink, float, experiment, construct, weight, volume, kitchen, Archimedes, submarine, ballast tanks, ascending, descending, water, USS Maine, Camp Dewey, Spanish-American War
Images of the Past | Elevation (Estimating Height) Elevation (Estimating Height) Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDF)

During this activity, your students will complete one or more tasks in which they will learn about elevation, how to estimate the height of a tall building, design and construct a tower, and learn about the history of the lookout tower on South Dakota’s highest peak, Black Elk (formerly Harney Peak). (Images of the Past Online)


Images of the Past | Pressure - Wind Energy Images of the Past | Pressure - Wind Energy Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDFs)

During this activity your students will conduct a hands-on science activity in which they will learn how decreasing the volume of a container increases the pressure resulting in the movement of air. They will use the movement of air to complete a task. They will also learn about milestones in transportation and travel in the Black Hills, including the arrival of explorers and fur trappers, the U.S. military, prospectors, business people, farmers, and other settlers. IOTP

wind, energy, hands-on science activity, decreasing volume, increase pressure, air, inquire, inquiry, transportation, travel, Black Hills, explorers, fur trapper, prospectors, settlers, rails, trails, roads. stagecoach, locomotive, Boyle's law
Images of the Past | Stagecoach Travel: 1st Law of Motion Images of the Past | Stagecoach Travel: 1st Law of Motion Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDFs)

During this activity your students will learn about the often unglamorous and harsh realities of stagecoach travel. They will also participate in a hands-on activity in which they will use coaster wagons to investigate Newton’s 1st Law of Motion. IOTP

Inertia, constant velocity, Newton’s 1st Law of Motion Law of Inertia, unbalanced net force, weight, mass, demonstrations, inquire, inquiry, stagecoach, travel, hands-on activity, wagons, investigate accelerate, decelerate, change in direction
Images of the Past | The Respiratory System: Iron Lung The Respiratory System: Iron Lung Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDF)

During this lesson, your students will complete one or more activities in which they will learn about the surface area of their lungs, and how air moves in and out of the lungs during respiration. They will also gather data to understand how exercise affects respiration rate. Then they will learn about a medical device called the iron lung, which was used to treat many polio patients. Finally, they will understand the difference between negative and positive ventilation. (Images of the Past Online)
Images of the Past: Black Hills State University – 1913 (Lesson and Video) Images of the Past: Black Hills State University –1913

Lesson Plan (Also lower left - PDF)

Activity: Narration Exercise - The 1913 film introduces many interesting questions; why were the elementary students, the student teachers that were teaching the elementary students and the faculty gathered in front of the school? Why was the camera focused above the adults (concentrating on the building) during the first part of the film? There were sawhorses in front of the building; was this a dedication, the first day of school or an open house? There are many unanswered questions that will probably never be answered.

This historical film lacks a component which is necessary for the true account of this event; there is no narration, script or description available. To reinforce the importance of the written account of history, the students will develop a fictitious narration for the film or a section of the film. Access the lesson plan for activity idea.

The history of Black Hills State University as a public educational institution begins with an act passsed by the Dakota Territorial Legislature in 1881 and a provisional appropriation of building funds in 1883: If Spearfish and surrounding communities could obtain at least forty acres of land and hand over the deed to the Territorial government, the legislature would fund the construction of a school, "the exclusive purpose of which (would) be the instruction of persons both male and female in the art of teaching and in all the various branches that pertain to a good common school education."

Images of the Past Online

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(school, history, BHSU, black hills state university, south Dakota history, Dakota Territorial Legislature, 1881, provisional appropriation of building funds, 1883, Spearfish, government, instruction, teacher, teach, teaching, education, 1883 Dakota Territorial Normal School, 1885-1922 Spearfish Normal ("Dakota Normal" and "State Normal"), 1941 Black Hills Teachers)

Images of the Past: Crescent Creamery From Farm to Table Educational Resources (Also lower Left - PDF)

The following resource has information about making cheese in the classroom, a video about a 1928 dairy in South Dakota and more.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Images of the Past: Custer State Park Buffalo Roundup (Lesson and Video) Buffalo: Controlling Population Growth Lesson Plan

Related resources provided by the South Dakota State Historical Society:
Lesson Plan / Buffalo Head Sections

(Lessons also found lower left - PDFs)

Buffalo have had a place in Custer State Park since the first herd of 36 animals was brought to the park in 1914. Thriving in their native habitat, the herd quickly outgrew the amount of forage available on the park's pastures and rangelands. Park managers faced the prospect of losing both the rangeland and the buffalo, but they knew that by occasionally gathering together almost all of the buffalo and culling a select few from the herd, the forage would be conserved and the buffalo and other grazing animals in the park would likely have enough to eat year after year.

During this activity your students will learn about the efforts at Custer State Park and Badlands National Park to maintain a healthy buffalo (American Bison) population by facilitating an annual roundup. Your students will also learn about traditional uses of tatanka (buffalo) by Native Americans, about the size of a buffalo head and how organisms coexist in an ecosystem by playing a hands-on game. (Images of the Past Online)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Images of the Past: Density Bowling Density Bowling Educational Resources (Also lower Left - PDF)

During this activity your students will learn about the Lead Opera House and Recreation Center opened in 1914 as a gift from the Homestake Mining Company to the people of Lead. They will also use household items to investigate density. They will complete an activity in which they will construct a density tube and use it in a game of Density Bowling. IOTP
Images of the Past: Engineering: Building a Tower Engineering: Building a Tower Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDFs)

During this activity your students will learn about the process of extracting gold ore from the earth and extracting gold from the ore. The students will see how the process changed over time but the end result was the same, gold bullion of greater or lesser purity. They will also learn that it took a great deal of ore to produce an ounce of gold; and they will see how massive machines made the process possible. The students will look for historical clues in the video footage to help identify the age of the video. The students will then participate in a hands-on activity in which they will build a simple tower that will convey the importance of starting with a solid foundation/base when designing a machine or building. IOTP

engineering, building, tower, gold, ore, mine, bullion, ounce of gold, hands-on, foundation, extracting gold
Images of the Past: Faith, SD Fair and Rodeo - 1927, Part One Rodeo: An Abstract Look Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDF)

During this activity your students will create an abstract painting or drawing using lines, forms, textures, shapes, color, etc. Your students will select an event in the video and recreate the mood/feeling by creating the abstract piece.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Images of the Past: Faith, SD Fair and Rodeo - 1927, Part Two Rodeo: An Abstract Look Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDF)

During this activity your students will create an abstract painting or drawing using lines, forms, textures, shapes, color, etc. Your students will select an event in the video and recreate the mood/feeling by creating the abstract piece.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Images of the Past: Golden Reward Mine - Cyanidation process Compound vs. Mixture: A Simple Separation Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDF)

Supplemental Video

During this activity your students will learn about compounds and mixtures. They will learn how a chemical change (reaction) is needed to break apart a compound and how mixtures can be separated by physical procedures. Your students will learn how workers at the Golden Reward Mine used a cyanide solution to chemically remove gold and silver from the ore they mined. Then your students will complete an activity in which they will use physical techniques to break apart a mixture. (Images of the Past Online)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Images of the Past: Golden Reward Mine Blast Compound vs. Mixture: A Simple Separation Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDF)

Supplemental Video

During this activity your students will learn about compounds and mixtures. They will learn how a chemical change (reaction) is needed to break apart a compound and how mixtures can be separated by physical procedures. Your students will learn how workers at the Golden Reward Mine used a cyanide solution to chemically remove gold and silver from the ore they mined. Then your students will complete an activity in which they will use physical techniques to break apart a mixture. (Images of the Past Online)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Images of the Past: Inquiry: Heat Transfer Inquiry: Heat Transfer Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDFs)

Related Video - Inside an icehouse (PBS LearningMedia)

During this activity your students will design an experiment in which they will investigate the transfer of heat. This is a perfect science activity for an afterschool group, club or elementary through high school science class. IOTP
Images of the Past: Lesson Plan: Mammoth Site (Archeologist: Unearth a Flower) Archeologist: Unearth a Flower Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDF)

During this activity your students will learn how the discovery of a single old bone lead to the development of one of the world's premier fossil beds. Your students will also complete an activity in which they will learn that fossils are very delicate and that extreme care must be taken when the fossils are excavated. (Images of the Past Online)
Images of the Past: Mount Rushmore (Calvin Coolidge I) Mount Rushmore (Calvin Coolidge I) Educational Resources (Also lower Left - PDF)

The following film was recorded on August 10, 1927, showing President Calvin Coolidge riding a horse to the dedication of the Mount Rushmore site. There are also views of Mount Rushmore as it looked before carving began.

In the next clip, a narrator provides some detail about the events of the dedication. Coolidge addressed the assembly and presented sculptor Gutzon Borglum with steel drill bits, symbolically providing the tools to get the carving underway. (Images of the Past Online)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Images of the Past: Mount Rushmore (Calvin Coolidge II) Mount Rushmore (Calvin Coolidge II) Educational Resources (Also lower Left - PDF)

The following film was recorded on August 10, 1927, a narrator provides some detail about the events of the dedication. Coolidge addressed the assembly and presented sculptor Gutzon Borglum with steel drill bits, symbolically providing the tools to get the carving underway.

In the next clip, President Calvin Coolidge is shown riding a horse to the dedication of the Mount Rushmore site. There are also views of Mount Rushmore as it looked before carving began. (Images of the Past Online)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Images of the Past: Mount Rushmore (President Franklin Delano Roosevelt) Mount Rushmore (President Franklin Delano Roosevelt) Educational Resources (Also lower Left - PDF)

On August 30, 1936 President Franklin Delano Roosevelt visited the Black Hills to dedicate the Jefferson sculpture. The video contains two newsreel films. In the second, Roosevelt is shown speaking extemporaneously about the significance of Mount Rushmore and its place in history.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Images of the Past: Observation Skills and Directions Images of the Past: Observation Skills and Directions Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDFs)

During this lesson your students will complete one or more tasks in which they will enhance their observation skills and ability to follow directions. They will also learn about Custer’s Historical Stagecoach lines which provided daily accommodations for travelers from rail-heads at Sidney, Nebraska and Cheyenne, Wyoming. These are perfect activities for an afterschool group, club, elementary class or for home use. IOTP

observation skills, directions, stagecoach, Nebraska, Wyoming, stage coach, travel, prior knowledge, observe, map, cardinal directions, Left, Right, North, South, East, West, degrees, nonstandard units, obstacle course, commands
Images of the Past: Oldest Artifact Images of the Past: Oldest Artifact Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDFs)

During this activity your students will learn about the Rebecca Goodwin Bonnet which is the oldest preserved artifact at the Siouxland Heritage Museum. Each student will research their family’s oldest known artifact and document its history. IOTP
Images of the Past: President Dwight Eisenhower Visits South Dakota South Dakota - Visits by the Presidents Educational Resources (Also lower Left - PDF)

Many presidents have visited South Dakota. Film footage of President Calvin Coolidge, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, President Dwight Eisenhower and President John F. Kennedy are highlighted in the resource above.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Images of the Past: President John F. Kennedy Visits South Dakota South Dakota - Visits by the Presidents Educational Resources (Also lower Left - PDF)

Many presidents have visited South Dakota. Film footage of President Calvin Coolidge, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, President Dwight Eisenhower and President John F. Kennedy are highlighted in the resource above.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Images of the Past: Reaction Rate: Surface Area Reaction Rate: Surface Area Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDFs)

During this activity your students will learn about a tragic 1930 fire at the Ellison Shaft, Homestake Gold Mine, which claimed the life of two men. They will also use household items to investigate how an increase in the surface area of a solid reactant increases the reaction rate of a chemical reaction. Finally, they will learn how adding chemicals like aspirin to a sewer system is damaging to the environment and water supply. IOTP
Images of the Past: Signage…Free Water? Signage…Free Water? Educational Resources (Also lower Left - PDF)

During this activity your students will design a billboard, tweet and Facebook entry that will encourage people to visit a specific location like a town, business, state park, etc. Your students will also learn about Wall Drug and the simple, but incredibly effective marketing strategy that made a small town pharmacy world-famous. IOTP
Images of the Past: Sioux Falls area Snowstorm of 1909 Terminal Velocity: Coffee Filter Educational Resources (Also lower Left - PDF)

During this activity your students will learn about memorable South Dakota blizzards. They will also use coffee filters to investigate air resistance, friction and terminal velocity. IOTP
Images of the Past: Skiing at Terry Peak (Lesson and Video) Images of the Past: Skiing at Terry Peak

Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDF)

Incline: Safety First (Engineering) - During this activity your students will construct, test and modify a shuttle that will safety transport passengers (3 eggs) down a slope. This is a perfect engineering activity for an afterschool group, club or elementary-high school science class. Access the lesson plan for activity idea.

Images of the Past Online Terry Peak is located in the northern Black Hills of South Dakota, near Lead. The history of organized, recreational skiing on Terry Peak dates back to at least 1938 and a group of area ski enthusiasts calling themselves the Bald Mountain Ski Club. The Bald Mountain Ski Club installed a rope tow up on Stewart Slope, and so began Terry Peak Ski Area.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(physics, physical science, incline plane, gravity, science, simple machine, engineering, hypothesis, testing, forces, force, rise over run)

Images of the Past: Spearfish Aviation - 1913 Bernoulli’s Principle (Demonstrations) Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDF)

The lab write-up above includes many demonstrations that highlight Bernoulli’s Principle. The lab write-up starts with flight/lift and continues with additional related demonstrations. Each section includes a small explanation and related video lesson. A detailed explanation of Bernoulli’s Principle, with related web resources (flight, airfoils, forces, etc.), is also included. (airplane, air plane)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Images of the Past: Spearfish Aviation - 1938 Bernoulli’s Principle (Demonstrations) Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDF)

The lab write-up above includes many demonstrations that highlight Bernoulli’s Principle. The lab write-up starts with flight/lift and continues with additional related demonstrations. Each section includes a small explanation and related video lesson. A detailed explanation of Bernoulli’s Principle, with related web resources (flight, airfoils, forces, etc.), is also included. (airplane, air plane)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Images of the Past: Spearfish Canyon 1938 Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDF)

Tourism Promotion: Then & Now - During this activity your students will compare and contrast a South Dakota promotional film from 1938 to modern South Dakota tourism videos. Then your students will write a promotional Tweet or Facebook entry encouraging their family/friends to visit a destination in South Dakota.

Tourism is big business in South Dakota and it has been for a long time. The following information from the South Dakota Department of Tourism illustrates this point.

Images of the Past Online A promotional film produced by the Chicago Northwestern Railroad shows people enjoying various recreational activities in the Black Hills in 1938. The film would have likely been shown in movie theaters before the featured film.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(tourism, horses, animals, black hills, hiking, fishing, Potato Creek Jonny, geodes)
Images of the Past: Stereotypical Images Images of the Past: Stereotypical Images Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDFs)

Your students will participate in an activity in which they will contemplate stereotypical images and preconceived notions. Then your students will learn about Potato Creek Johnny (John Perrett) and a life changing gold nugget he found on May 27, 1929. The nugget he discovered was over four inches long, resembling the shape of a woman’s leg. The stereotypical images and preconceived notions activity should be completed before you show the students any images of Potato Creek Johnny. IOTP
Images of the Past: Texting While Driving Texting How Far? Lesson Plan / Student Handout (Also lower Left - PDFs)

The Dangers of Texting While Driving - During this lab your students will participate in a hands-on activity in which they will convert miles/hour to ft/sec. They will calculate the speed of an object. Then, they will calculate how far an object travels in a specific time based on a given rate. Next, they will test how long it takes to send and read a text message. The times obtained will be used to calculate how far a car travels at different rates during a text message. Finally, they will learn about Thomas L. Fawick of Sioux Falls who built the Fawick Flyer, which was the first four-door automobile ever manufactured in the U.S. IOTP
Images of the Past: The 1912 SD State Fair IMAGES OF THE PAST The South Dakota State Fair - SDPB Television travels through time with a program based on rare video footage of the 1912 State Fair in Huron. Images of the Past The South Dakota State Fair takes us back a century, to a time when people dressed up for the Fair and our agricultural roots were a far larger part of South Dakota life. The 17 minutes of silent video included in the program reveals culture and lifestyles of the past. The film was provided by the South Dakota State Historical Society. We’ll learn how the historic film was discovered, look at some of the same locations a century later and see some vintage photographs, as well. (South Dakota State Historical Society) / High Resolution Video)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Images of the Past: The Glendoris (Latchstring) Inn Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDF)

During this activity your students will learn about the Glendoris (Latchstring) Inn, located in Spearfish Canyon. They will learn how the Inn changed over time and also how the transportation in and out of Spearfish Canyon changed.

Pre-settlement visitors to Spearfish Canyon in the northern Black Hills of South Dakota faced a nearly impassable tangle of woods and brush growing wild along the fast-moving stream now called Spearfish Creek. The only way in was on foot or by horse or mule.

The discovery of gold in the Hills and rapid growth in mining, timber, and related industries brought the first railroad line through the Canyon in 1893. The line connected Spearfish to Lead and Deadwood via the little town of Savoy, home of the McLaughlin Tie and Timber sawmill.

When the Mill closed in 1906, Glen Inglis purchased the small log cabin that served as the mill's office. In 1907 Inglis and his wife Doris opened the Glendoris Inn and Spearfish Canyon had its first lodge and eatery. Business was good. The Inglis' built new rooms adjacent to the original structure and added cabins to the grounds. (Additional information about the Glendoris (Latchstring) Inn and photos)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Images of the Past: The Haas Plesiosaur Fossil The Haas Plesiosaur Fossil Educational Resources (Also lower Left - PDF)

Complete the following activity - Many times it can be difficult for students to understand the meticulous and tedious process of removing fill/material from and around a fossil. During the following activity your students will bury a flower and then unearth it without damaging any part of the flower.
Images of the Past: The Open Cut - Subsidence NOTE: Not supported by Chrome - Use Explorer
or
Watch on PBS

The Open Cut - Subsidence Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDF)

During this activity your students will learn about the history of the Open Cut surface mine in Lead, SD. Your students will also learn about the issue of land subsidence in Lead which was due to poor backfilling/stabilization practices during the mining of gold. Then your students will complete an activity in which they will use materials like sand and coffee grounds to understand the importance of backfilling and stabilization. (Images of the Past Online)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Images of the Past: The Queen Bee Mill - Simple Machines Simple Machines Educational Resources (Also lower Left - PDF)

During this activity your students will construct a machine, made of simple machines, which will perform a specific task. They will also learn about the Queen Bee Mill which was located at Falls Park, Sioux Falls. IOTP
Images of the Past: Three Sioux Falls Schools - 1928 Point of View: First & Third Person Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDF)

During this activity your students will practice writing using first person and third person points of view. They will learn how pronouns like I, me, my, mine, myself, we, us and ours are used to write first person point of view. They will also learn how pronouns like them, they, he, she, his, her, and theirs are used to write the third person point of view. (Images of the Past Online)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Importance of the Winter Count (audio only) South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6)

Audio Only - Victor Douville, Sinte Gleska University, explains the importance of the winter count.

Winter Count Lessons

Related lesson plans and PowerPoint presentations, lower left.
Indian Relay: Lesson Plans and Chapter by Chapter Guide Lesson plans and chapter by chapter guide, lower left.

"Indian Relay" chronicles a season of Indian relay-horse races, which are popular within Native American communities across the Rocky Mountain West. Teams from the Shoshone-Bannock, Crow and Blackfeet nations in Idaho and Montana are featured.
Infinite Variety 101 - Introduction: South Dakota Geography Infinite Variety
101. Introduction: South Dakota Geography

Teacher resources available at sdpb.org in the Learning section South Dakota is a land of sharp contrasts, from the gentle slopes of the Coteau des Prairies in the east to the jagged peaks of the Black Hills in the west. Infinite Variety takes you on a 14-part guided tour of South Dakota's geographic features.
Infinite Variety 102 - Place, Location, Region Infinite Variety
102 - Place, Location, Region

Teacher resources available at sdpb.org in the Learning section South Dakota is a land of sharp contrasts, from the gentle slopes of the Coteau des Prairies in the east to the jagged peaks of the Black Hills in the west. Infinite Variety takes you on a 14-part guided tour of South Dakota's geographic features.
Infinite Variety 103 - The Lithosphere Infinite Variety
103. The Lithosphere

Teacher resources available at sdpb.org in the Learning section South Dakota is a land of sharp contrasts, from the gentle slopes of the Coteau des Prairies in the east to the jagged peaks of the Black Hills in the west. Infinite Variety takes you on a 14-part guided tour of South Dakota's geographic features.
Infinite Variety 104 - The Atmosphere: Weather, Climate Infinite Variety
104. The Atmosphere: Weather, Climate

Teacher resources available at sdpb.org in the Learning section South Dakota is a land of sharp contrasts, from the gentle slopes of the Coteau des Prairies in the east to the jagged peaks of the Black Hills in the west. Infinite Variety takes you on a 14-part guided tour of South Dakota's geographic features.

15 Minutes
Infinite Variety 105 - The Biosphere Infinite Variety
105. The Biosphere

Teacher resources available at sdpb.org in the Learning section South Dakota is a land of sharp contrasts, from the gentle slopes of the Coteau des Prairies in the east to the jagged peaks of the Black Hills in the west. Infinite Variety takes you on a 14-part guided tour of South Dakota's geographic features.

15 Minutes
Infinite Variety 106 - The Hydrosphere: Water Features Infinite Variety
106. The Hydrosphere: Water Features

Teacher resources available at sdpb.org in the Learning section South Dakota is a land of sharp contrasts, from the gentle slopes of the Coteau des Prairies in the east to the jagged peaks of the Black Hills in the west. Infinite Variety takes you on a 14-part guided tour of South Dakota's geographic features.

SDPB 15 Minutes
Infinite Variety 107 - Native American Culture Infinite Variety
107. Native American Culture

Teacher resources available at sdpb.org in the Learning section South Dakota is a land of sharp contrasts, from the gentle slopes of the Coteau des Prairies in the east to the jagged peaks of the Black Hills in the west. Infinite Variety takes you on a 14-part guided tour of South Dakota's geographic features.

SDPB 15 Minutes
Infinite Variety 108 - Exploration & Settlement Infinite Variety
108. Exploration & Settlement

Teacher resources available at sdpb.org in the Learning section South Dakota is a land of sharp contrasts, from the gentle slopes of the Coteau des Prairies in the east to the jagged peaks of the Black Hills in the west. Infinite Variety takes you on a 14-part guided tour of South Dakota's geographic features.

SDPB 15 Minutes
Infinite Variety 109 - Agriculture Infinite Variety
109. Agriculture

Teacher resources available at sdpb.org in the Learning section South Dakota is a land of sharp contrasts, from the gentle slopes of the Coteau des Prairies in the east to the jagged peaks of the Black Hills in the west. Infinite Variety takes you on a 14-part guided tour of South Dakota's geographic features.

SDPB 15 Minutes
Infinite Variety 110 - Industry & Commerce Infinite Variety
110. Industry & Commerce

Teacher resources available at sdpb.org in the Learning section South Dakota is a land of sharp contrasts, from the gentle slopes of the Coteau des Prairies in the east to the jagged peaks of the Black Hills in the west. Infinite Variety takes you on a 14-part guided tour of South Dakota's geographic features.

SDPB 15 Minutes
Infinite Variety 111 - Tourism & Recreation Infinite Variety
111. Tourism & Recreation

Teacher resources available at sdpb.org in the Learning section South Dakota is a land of sharp contrasts, from the gentle slopes of the Coteau des Prairies in the east to the jagged peaks of the Black Hills in the west. Infinite Variety takes you on a 14-part guided tour of South Dakota's geographic features.

SDPB 15 Minutes
Infinite Variety 112 - Population & Settlement Infinite Variety
112. Population & Settlement

Teacher resources available at sdpb.org in the Learning section South Dakota is a land of sharp contrasts, from the gentle slopes of the Coteau des Prairies in the east to the jagged peaks of the Black Hills in the west. Infinite Variety takes you on a 14-part guided tour of South Dakota's geographic features.

SDPB 15 Minutes
Infinite Variety 113 - Regions of South Dakota Infinite Variety
113. Regions of South Dakota

Teacher resources available at sdpb.org in the Learning section South Dakota is a land of sharp contrasts, from the gentle slopes of the Coteau des Prairies in the east to the jagged peaks of the Black Hills in the west. Infinite Variety takes you on a 14-part guided tour of South Dakota's geographic features.

SDPB 15 Minutes
Infinite Variety 114 - The Future of South Dakota Infinite Variety
114. The Future of South Dakota

Teacher resources available at sdpb.org in the Learning section South Dakota is a land of sharp contrasts, from the gentle slopes of the Coteau des Prairies in the east to the jagged peaks of the Black Hills in the west. Infinite Variety takes you on a 14-part guided tour of South Dakota's geographic features.

SDPB 15 Minutes
Inipi (Sweat Lodge) Lesson Plan – Inipi (Sweat Lodge) - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2 : OSEUS2, OSEU2)
(Essential Understanding 3 : OSEUS3, OSEU73)
OSEUS, OSEU
Insects (Activities Only, PDF Lower Left) (Activities Only, PDF Lower Left)

Insects - Resources for classroom and home use, including activity ideas, video, guidebooks and more.
Inside our Human Body 101 - From Ear to Hear Inside our Human Body
101. From Ear to Hear - Introduces the properties of sound, the structure of the ear, and the consequences of noise pollution. The video takes the viewer deep inside an ear to witness the mechanics of hearing and balance.

Discover the world's most amazing and efficient machine. From the mechanics of a single heartbeat to the potential of genetic engineering, Inside Our Human Body goes beyond the basics by documenting human mechanics in motion.

15-minutes
Inside our Human Body 102 - Engineering Human Life Inside our Human Body
102. Engineering Human Life - Explores DNA, RNA, chromosomes, and the exciting possibilities of genetic engineering, including the Human Genome Project's hope for a cure for cancer.

Discover the world's most amazing and efficient machine. From the mechanics of a single heartbeat to the potential of genetic engineering, Inside Our Human Body goes beyond the basics by documenting human mechanics in motion.
15-minutes
Inside our Human Body 103 - Have a Heart Inside our Human Body
103. Have a Heart---Looks at the structure of the heart and examines the causes of heart disease. Students will follow the body's blood as it is pumped by the heart and circulates through arteries, veins, and capillaries.

Discover the world's most amazing and efficient machine. From the mechanics of a single heartbeat to the potential of genetic engineering, Inside Our Human Body goes beyond the basics by documenting human mechanics in motion.
15-minutes
Inside our Human Body 104 - The Kidneys Inside our Human Body
104. The Kidneys---Explains the human body's filtration system, examining the intricate structure of the kidneys and such complications as kidney stones and kidney failure.

Discover the world's most amazing and efficient machine. From the mechanics of a single heartbeat to the potential of genetic engineering, Inside Our Human Body goes beyond the basics by documenting human mechanics in motion.
15-minutes
Inside our Human Body 105 - Muscles Inside our Human Body
105. Muscles---Differentiates between involuntary, voluntary, and reflex muscles. Explores the mechanics of movement through the relationship of flexor to extensor muscles.

Discover the world's most amazing and efficient machine. From the mechanics of a single heartbeat to the potential of genetic engineering, Inside Our Human Body goes beyond the basics by documenting human mechanics in motion.
15-minutes
Inside our Human Body 106 - The Skeleton Inside our Human Body
106. The Skeleton---Traces the evolution of that multifaceted structure from its marine-life origins 500 million years ago to today's human skeleton. The program shows how this powerful framework supports weight, allows movement, acts as a storeroom, and repairs itself.

Discover the world's most amazing and efficient machine. From the mechanics of a single heartbeat to the potential of genetic engineering, Inside Our Human Body goes beyond the basics by documenting human mechanics in motion.
15-minutes
Inside our Human Body 107 - Skin Inside our Human Body
107. Skin---Gives students a new respect for the body's largest organ as they go inside the epidermis, the dermis, and the hypodermis to understand why skin is the frontier that separates organisms from their outside worlds.

Discover the world's most amazing and efficient machine. From the mechanics of a single heartbeat to the potential of genetic engineering, Inside Our Human Body goes beyond the basics by documenting human mechanics in motion.
15-minutes
Inside our Human Body 108 - Smell and Taste Inside our Human Body
108. Smell and Taste - Emphasizes the importance of these senses to survival throughout human history. Analyzes the different types of papillae on the tongue, the four types of taste, and the importance of the olfactory membrane.

Discover the world's most amazing and efficient machine. From the mechanics of a single heartbeat to the potential of genetic engineering, Inside Our Human Body goes beyond the basics by documenting human mechanics in motion.
15-minutes
Introduction to the Lakota Concept of Mitakuye Oyasin, or All My Relations Introduction to the Lakota Concept of Mitakuye Oyasin, or All My Relations - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshop 2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 3: OSEUS3, OSEU3)
OSEUS, OSEU
J. Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing - Cylinder Realism Video - Cylinder Realism: Artist Dick Termes uses the techniques from the earlier videos to draw a realistic ice cream shop. An animated video reveals several objects being drawn as well as real world objects created from cylinders. The video focuses on how Dick draws the ice cream shop scene.

Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing is a multi-part video series featuring South Dakota artist Dick Termes teaching basic drawing techniques. Resources available for the project are described in the following Teaching and User’s Guide and are available at PBS Learning Media. The series includes more than five hours of content in 20 individual videos (Preview), activities, a teacher’s guide and lesson plans that could be integrated into classrooms of all kinds or for use at home.
K. Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing - Sphere Basic Video - Sphere Basic: Artist Dick Termes introduces spheres and notes the difficulty of finding an artistic angle because spheres look like circles from all angles. He explains that “stacking” them—drawing them one behind another—and subtracting from them reveals dimensions. He also draws a group of people from his imagination starting with their heads and faces as spherical forms.

Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing is a multi-part video series featuring South Dakota artist Dick Termes teaching basic drawing techniques. Resources available for the project are described in the following Teaching and User’s Guide and are available at PBS Learning Media. The series includes more than five hours of content in 20 individual videos (Preview), activities, a teacher’s guide and lesson plans that could be integrated into classrooms of all kinds or for use at home.
Kids' Quest: Fill Your Head with Space Go here for activities and demonstrations

Kid's Quest offers an interactive learning adventure for students across SD and is a TV production of South Dakota Public Broadcasting designed to bring guest experts and live interaction into SD classrooms.
Kids' Quest: Investigators on the Job Go here for some great labs

Kids' Quest offers an interactive learning adventure for students across SD. The educational series allowed students to ask questions during programs.


Kids' Quest: Making Change Really Counts (Entire Program) Go here for more activities and resources

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

SDPB presents a new program that takes a funny look at the money business. Kids’ Quest Making Change Really Counts follows the trail of Rusty Nickel, a would-be smart guy who’s got some problems when it comes to money.

With the advent of cash registers that calculate everything automatically, the way to manually make change seems to be in danger of becoming a lost art. The program, for use in classrooms and by homeschoolers, teaches kids, and every age, how to count back change and develop money skills.

(dollar, quarter, penny, nickel, math, coins, currency, coinage, denomination)
Kids' Quest: Making Change Really Counts (Part I) Go here for more activities and resources

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

SDPB presents a new program that takes a funny look at the money business. Kids’ Quest Making Change Really Counts follows the trail of Rusty Nickel, a would-be smart guy who’s got some problems when it comes to money.

With the advent of cash registers that calculate everything automatically, the way to manually make change seems to be in danger of becoming a lost art. The program, for use in classrooms and by homeschoolers, teaches kids, and every age, how to count back change and develop money skills.

(dollar, quarter, penny, nickel, math, coins, currency, coinage, denomination)
Kids' Quest: Making Change Really Counts (Part II) Go here for more activities and resources

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

SDPB presents a new program that takes a funny look at the money business. Kids’ Quest Making Change Really Counts follows the trail of Rusty Nickel, a would-be smart guy who’s got some problems when it comes to money.

With the advent of cash registers that calculate everything automatically, the way to manually make change seems to be in danger of becoming a lost art. The program, for use in classrooms and by homeschoolers, teaches kids, and every age, how to count back change and develop money skills.

(dollar, quarter, penny, nickel, math, coins, currency, coinage, denomination)
Kids' Quest: Making Change Really Counts (Part III) Go here for more activities and resources

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

SDPB presents a new program that takes a funny look at the money business. Kids’ Quest Making Change Really Counts follows the trail of Rusty Nickel, a would-be smart guy who’s got some problems when it comes to money.

With the advent of cash registers that calculate everything automatically, the way to manually make change seems to be in danger of becoming a lost art. The program, for use in classrooms and by homeschoolers, teaches kids, and every age, how to count back change and develop money skills.

(dollar, quarter, penny, nickel, math, coins, currency, coinage, denomination)
Kids' Quest: Making Change Really Counts (Part IV) Go here for more activities and resources

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

SDPB presents a new program that takes a funny look at the money business. Kids’ Quest Making Change Really Counts follows the trail of Rusty Nickel, a would-be smart guy who’s got some problems when it comes to money.

With the advent of cash registers that calculate everything automatically, the way to manually make change seems to be in danger of becoming a lost art. The program, for use in classrooms and by homeschoolers, teaches kids, and every age, how to count back change and develop money skills.

(dollar, quarter, penny, nickel, math, coins, currency, coinage, denomination)
Kids' Quest: Making Change Really Counts (Part V) Go here for more activities and resources

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

SDPB presents a new program that takes a funny look at the money business. Kids’ Quest Making Change Really Counts follows the trail of Rusty Nickel, a would-be smart guy who’s got some problems when it comes to money.

With the advent of cash registers that calculate everything automatically, the way to manually make change seems to be in danger of becoming a lost art. The program, for use in classrooms and by homeschoolers, teaches kids, and every age, how to count back change and develop money skills.

(dollar, quarter, penny, nickel, math, coins, currency, coinage, denomination)
Kings of the Court: History of Boys HS Basketball in SD An hour long documentary about the history of boys high school basketball in South Dakota.
Korea Survivor Stories Korea Survivor Stories
Korean War Memorial Korean War Memorial
9/18/2004
L. Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing - Sphere Realism Video - Sphere Realism: Artist Dick Termes uses the techniques from the earlier videos to draw realistic wildflowers in a nature scene.

Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing is a multi-part video series featuring South Dakota artist Dick Termes teaching basic drawing techniques. Resources available for the project are described in the following Teaching and User’s Guide and are available at PBS Learning Media. The series includes more than five hours of content in 20 individual videos (Preview), activities, a teacher’s guide and lesson plans that could be integrated into classrooms of all kinds or for use at home.
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 1a - Trouble At School (Owáyawa-ta Wóiyotiyekiye) Activity Ideas Below Description

NOTE: Video player on this page only works using Internet Explorer browser. Use site below to view in different browsers.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Online

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


The Berenstain Bears Site (Click "Kids" for Activities) Flash – Use Internet Explorer.

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
Brother has been kept home from school for a few days with the flu and neglects to do the schoolwork that Sister delivered from his teacher. As a result, Brother’s next math test mark is zero and he doesn’t know how to break the bad news to Mama and Papa. He turns to Gramps and Gran for help and learns that getting a problem out in the open, goes a long way toward solving it.

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla tónačhaŋ khúža čha wayáwa í šni. Čhaŋkhé waúŋspekhiye kiŋ thiyáta takúku awówaši ečhúŋ čhíŋ éyaš wówapi eyá iyáyekhiye kiŋ átaš él étuŋwe šni. Yuŋkȟáŋ heháŋl wayáwa khí na wówiyawa wóuŋspe iyútȟapi k’uŋ héhaŋ taŋyáŋkel ečhúŋ šni. Húŋku kiŋ é na atkúku kiŋ onáȟ’uŋwičhayiŋ kta ikȟópȟa čha tȟuŋkášitku kiŋ é na kȟúŋšitku kiŋ wóokiye wičhákila. Wahókuŋkhiyapi na tókhel wóglušna aphíkiyiŋ kte héči okíyakapi. Hetáŋ wóuŋspe waŋ waŋkátuya čha ičú.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Question: Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Answer: Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs (NOTE: Flash player – Use Internet Explorer.)

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version?

Visit your local library for the Berenstain Bears books.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Mondays, 2:00pm CT and Saturdays, 6:30am CT

The Lakota Berenstain Bears

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher.

(Search Terms - Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 1b - Visit the Dentist (Hiáphiye ektá) Activity Ideas Below Description

NOTE: Video player on this page only works using Internet Explorer browser. Use site below to view in different browsers.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Online

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


The Berenstain Bears Site (Click "Kids" for Activities) Flash – Use Internet Explorer.

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
When Sister gets her first loose tooth, Brother teases her that the dentist will extract it with a big yanking tool. After Sister watches Brother get a cavity filled, she discovers that her dentist is a very gentle fellow and he assures her that most baby teeth don’t need yanking. They fall out all on their own. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ tȟokéya hí waŋ oglógleke. Matȟó Hokšíla gluškéhaŋ na hiáphiye kiŋ iyúžipa tȟáŋka uŋ kíčiyužuŋ kta kéye. Yuŋkȟáŋ Matȟó Hokšíla íŋš-eyá hí waŋ oȟlóke ló. Aphíkičičhiye k’uŋ héhaŋ tȟaŋkšítku waŋyáŋg nážiŋ yuŋkȟáŋ owáhečheča. Hiáphiye kiŋ hé iwáštegla khuwá kta čha akíbleziŋ na agná hé kičhí wóglaka yuŋkȟáŋ hí k’uŋ hé takómni nažúŋ kta čha iníhiŋčiyiŋ kte šni kéye.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Question: Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Answer: Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs (NOTE: Flash player – Use Internet Explorer.)

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version?

Visit your local library for the Berenstain Bears books.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Mondays, 2:00pm CT and Saturdays, 6:30am CT

The Lakota Berenstain Bears

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher.

(Search Terms - Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 2a - Mighty Milton (Wóšikšičeka Waŋ Iglúwičakȟe) Activity Ideas Below Description

NOTE: Video player on this page only works using Internet Explorer browser. Use site below to view in different browsers.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Online

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


The Berenstain Bears Site (Click "Kids" for Activities) Flash – Use Internet Explorer.

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
When a new cub at school is teased by Too-Tall and the gang for his lack of sporting ability, Brother takes it upon himself to help his new friend renew his self-esteem by finding value in the things he can do well. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Owáyawa-ta wayáwa waŋ lečhála í yuŋkȟáŋ Háŋskela é na kȟoláwičhaye kiŋ ób šičáya khuwápi na škalwáyuphike šni kiŋ uŋ iȟáȟapi. Yuŋkȟáŋ Matȟó Hokšíla úŋšila na táku iwáyuphika héči hená slolkíyiŋ kta čha ókiye. Héčhel yuwáš’akiŋ na nakúŋ iglúonihaŋ kta čha íyopaštakiŋ kte.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Question: Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Answer: Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs (NOTE: Flash player – Use Internet Explorer.)

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version?

Visit your local library for the Berenstain Bears books.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Mondays, 2:00pm CT and Saturdays, 6:30am CT

The Lakota Berenstain Bears

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher.

(Search Terms - Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 2b Mama’s New Job (Húŋkupi kiŋ wówaši lečhála tȟáwa kiŋ) Activity Ideas Below Description

NOTE: Video player on this page only works using Internet Explorer browser. Use site below to view in different browsers.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Online

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


The Berenstain Bears Site (Click "Kids" for Activities) Flash – Use Internet Explorer.

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
When Mama decides to open her own quilt shop, Papa and the cubs are convinced they won’t be able to cope around the house without her. However it’s only when they stop thinking about themselves and start thinking about supporting Mama and her new endeavor do Papa and the cubs band together to share the load and make it work. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla húŋku kiŋ owíŋža paškíškapi owíyopȟeye waŋží íŋyaŋgkhiyiŋ kta gluštáŋ. Ho éyaš atkúku kiŋ é na čhiŋčála kiŋ išnála taŋyáŋ thiglépi okíhipi šni kéčhaŋič’iŋpi. Kítaŋȟčiŋ awáič’ičhiŋpi kiŋ hé ayúštaŋpi yuŋkȟáŋ tókheškhe húŋku kiŋ wówaši ečhúŋ kta patítaŋpi kta héči awáčhiŋpi okíhipi. Ptáyela wówaši ečhúŋpi háŋtaŋš táku ke éyaš ečhél ikíčiyayapi kta čha akíblezapi.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Question: Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Answer: Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs (NOTE: Flash player – Use Internet Explorer.)

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version?

Visit your local library for the Berenstain Bears books.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Mondays, 2:00pm CT and Saturdays, 6:30am CT

The Lakota Berenstain Bears

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher.

(Search Terms - Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 3a - Go To School (Wayáwapi) Activity Ideas Below Description

NOTE: Video player on this page only works using Internet Explorer browser. Use site below to view in different browsers.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Online

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


The Berenstain Bears Site (Click "Kids" for Activities) Flash – Use Internet Explorer.

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
Too-Tall and the gang amuse themselves at Sister’s expense by warning her how hard third grade will be and how strict Teacher Jane is. Brother tries unsuccessfully to convince Sis not to worry. Mama reminisces about Sister starting kindergarten and reflects on how her daughter’s feelings back then were exactly the same. Sure enough, when Sister starts grade three she enjoys the new experience just like she did when she started kindergarten. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Háŋskela é na kȟoláwičhaye kiŋ ób Matȟó Hokšíla tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ oštéšteya khuwápi. Wóuŋspe ičíyamni kiŋ oéčhuŋ šíča kéyapi, ho naháŋ waúŋspewičhakhiya waŋ Jane ečíyapi kiŋ hé očhíŋšiča kéyapi. Matȟó Hokšíla čhaŋl’ásniye wačhíŋ yéš áta héčhena kigná-phičašniyaŋ iníhaŋ. Ho éyaš húŋku kiŋ wakíksuye-khiya yuŋkȟáŋ héhaŋni iyéčheȟčiŋ wačhíŋyuza čha kiksúye. Ho éyaš húŋku kiŋ tókhel wíyukčaŋ kiŋ ečhéȟčiŋ iyéčhetu yuŋkȟáŋ Matȟó hokšíla tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ wóuŋspe ičíyamni kiŋ ektá ópȟa háŋl húŋku kiŋ iyéčhel íŋš-eyá iyókiphiič’iye.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Question: Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Answer: Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs (NOTE: Flash player – Use Internet Explorer.)

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version?

Visit your local library for the Berenstain Bears books.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Mondays, 2:00pm CT and Saturdays, 6:30am CT

The Lakota Berenstain Bears

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher.

(Search Terms - Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 3b - A Week at Grandma’s (Tȟokȟáŋl Thiíyuŋkapi) Activity Ideas Below Description

NOTE: Video player on this page only works using Internet Explorer browser. Use site below to view in different browsers.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Online

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


The Berenstain Bears Site (Click "Kids" for Activities) Flash – Use Internet Explorer.

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
When Mama and Papa go off on a second honeymoon, Brother and Sister are certain they’re in for the most boring time of their lives spending an entire week with their grandparents. However the cubs’ preconception that old people are boring does a complete turnaround as they end up having an even better time than their parents - thanks to their anything but boring grandparents. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla húŋku na atkúku kiŋ okíčhiyuze wókiksuye uŋ tȟáŋtaŋhaŋ wóasnikiye ičúpi kte. Yuŋkȟáŋ Matȟó Hokšíla é na tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ oíyokiphi yuhápi kte šni kéčhaŋič’iŋpi, ičhíŋ okó waŋží heháŋyaŋ átaya kȟúŋšitku thí kiŋ ektá yaŋkápi kta čha hé uŋ. Ho éyaš ipáweȟya awíwičhayukčaŋpi čha akíblezapi ičhíŋ wakáŋla kiŋ henáos áta khilípi na héčhiya ókowaŋžila okhílita. Iyé thípi kiŋ hétu ke éyaš héčhel iyókiphiič’iyapi šni.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Question: Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Answer: Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs (NOTE: Flash player – Use Internet Explorer.)

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version?

Visit your local library for the Berenstain Bears books.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Mondays, 2:00pm CT and Saturdays, 6:30am CT

The Lakota Berenstain Bears

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher.

(Search Terms - Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 4a - Trouble With Pets (Waníyaŋpi waŋ theȟíya awáŋyaŋkapi) Activity Ideas Below Description

NOTE: Video player on this page only works using Internet Explorer browser. Use site below to view in different browsers.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Online

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


The Berenstain Bears Site (Click "Kids" for Activities) Flash – Use Internet Explorer.

New Lakota Dictionary Online


Description:
Brother and Sister adopt one of Farmer Ben’s new puppies and soon discover that having a pet is a big responsibility. When the two pet owners leave to play with friends, the puppy stays behind and destroys the living room. As a result, the puppy is banished to the backyard. Brother and Sister apologize for neglecting their duties and Mama and Papa decide to give the cubs and the puppy a second chance. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Wóžu wičháša waŋ Ben ečíyapi kiŋ šuŋȟpála eyá lečhála wičhátȟuŋpi čha wičháyuha yuŋkȟáŋ Matȟó Hokšíla é na tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ waŋží waníyaŋpi s’e yuhápi. Éyaš itȟáhena wóiksape tȟáŋka čha ablézapi. Watóhaŋl kȟoláwičhayapi kiŋ ób škátapi kta čha éna yaŋké-khiyapi yuŋkȟáŋ tȟokȟáŋl úŋpi kiŋ hé ečhúŋhaŋ šuŋȟpála k’uŋ hé oásnikiye kiŋ áta iháŋgwičhakhiye. Hé uŋ thilázata ečé yuhá iyówiŋkhiyapi na ečhél šuŋȟpála tȟáwapi kiŋ él éwačhiŋpi šni kiŋ hé awíčhakičiktuŋžapi kta wičhákilapi. Yuŋkȟáŋ heháŋl húŋkupi na atkúkupi nuphíŋ phiyá awáŋyaŋg iyútȟe-wičhakhiyapi kta gluštáŋpi.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Question: Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Answer: Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs (NOTE: Flash player – Use Internet Explorer.)

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version?

Visit your local library for the Berenstain Bears books.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Mondays, 2:00pm CT and Saturdays, 6:30am CT

The Lakota Berenstain Bears

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher.

(Search Terms - Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 4b The Sitter (Hokší Awáŋyaŋke Kiŋ) Activity Ideas Below Description

NOTE: Video player on this page only works using Internet Explorer browser. Use site below to view in different browsers.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Online

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


The Berenstain Bears Site (Click "Kids" for Activities) Flash – Use Internet Explorer.

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
Brother and Sister do some damage in Mrs. Grizzle’s flowerbed while retrieving their baseball. Instead of stepping forward to apologize, the cubs get nervous and run home. As fate would have it, Mama arranges for Mrs. Grizzle to babysit the cubs that very night. Brother and Sister anticipate a very stern talking to, but are surprised by Mrs. Grizzle’s kindhearted manner. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla é na tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ Matȟóȟota Wiŋ wanáȟča owóžu tȟáwa kiŋ ektá tȟápa okílepi yuŋkȟáŋ wanúŋ alíliya iháŋgyapi. Šičáya ečhúŋpi kiŋ hé gluwáštepi šni yešáŋ sígluhapi na thiyáta khípi. Ho čha húŋkupi kiŋ ektáwapȟaya kiŋ Matȟóȟota Wiŋ awáŋwičhayaŋkiŋ kta kéye k’uŋ héhaŋ íyowičhaktekiŋ kta ikȟópȟapi. Ečháŋleš, Matȟóȟota Wiŋ taŋyáŋ wičhákhuwa na tókȟa yawá šni s’e ophíič’iye.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Question: Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Answer: Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs (NOTE: Flash player – Use Internet Explorer.)

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version?

Visit your local library for the Berenstain Bears books.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Mondays, 2:00pm CT and Saturdays, 6:30am CT

The Lakota Berenstain Bears

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher.

(Search Terms - Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 5a Too Much TV (Wičhítenaškaŋškaŋ Kiŋ Etáŋhaŋ Iglúȟlayapi) Activity Ideas Below Description

NOTE: Video player on this page only works using Internet Explorer browser. Use site below to view in different browsers.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Online

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


The Berenstain Bears Site (Click "Kids" for Activities) Flash – Use Internet Explorer.

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
When Mama puts a ban on television watching for one whole week, the cubs initially go into hysterics. As the week unfolds, Brother, Sister and Papa too, find that their interests extend well beyond the television set. They grow to realize just how entertaining the great outdoors and other "simple" pleasures can be. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Okó waŋží átaya, Matȟó hokšíla húŋku kiŋ tuwéni wičhítenaškaŋškaŋ waŋyáŋg yaŋká iyówiŋwičhakhiyiŋ kte šni kéye. Tȟokéya čhiŋčála kiŋ líla iwáčhiŋkȟopi na tókheškhe imáǧaǧaič’iyapi-ka núŋ tkȟá. Ho éyaš óčibčib takúku tȟókeča, tȟaŋkál škátapi ešá, ečhúŋphiča na oíyokiphi čha ablés áyapi.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Question: Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Answer: Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs (NOTE: Flash player – Use Internet Explorer.)

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version?

Visit your local library for the Berenstain Bears books.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Mondays, 2:00pm CT and Saturdays, 6:30am CT

The Lakota Berenstain Bears

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher.

(Search Terms - Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 5b Trick or Treat (Itóǧiŋ Kitȟúŋpi) Activity Ideas Below Description

NOTE: Video player on this page only works using Internet Explorer browser. Use site below to view in different browsers.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Online

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


The Berenstain Bears Site (Click "Kids" for Activities) Flash – Use Internet Explorer.

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
Brother and Sister plan to avoid Widder Jones’ house when they go trick or treating because neighborhood lore has it that she’s a witch. Mama knows Widder Jones personally and tells the cubs what a sweet person she is. When the evening is over the cubs agree with Mama. They enjoyed visiting Widder Jones more than anyone else that Halloween. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla é na tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ thiíyaza čhaŋmháŋska lápi kiŋháŋ Hičhóla Wiŋ thí kiŋ etáŋ ȟeyáb ečhúŋpi kta awáčhiŋpi. Ho éyaš húŋkupi kiŋ Hičhóla Wiŋ taŋyáŋ slolyá čha wíŋyaŋ oȟ’áŋwašte héčha kéya owíčhakiyake. Aŋpétu haŋkéyela íŋš-eyá héčhel wačhíŋkiyuzapi ičhíŋ athílehaŋyaŋg ípi na hé kičhí iyótaŋ oíyokiphi yuhápi.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Question: Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Answer: Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs (NOTE: Flash player – Use Internet Explorer.)

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version?

Visit your local library for the Berenstain Bears books.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Mondays, 2:00pm CT and Saturdays, 6:30am CT

The Lakota Berenstain Bears

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher.

(Search Terms - Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 6a - Trouble With Money (Mázaska Kamná Sáŋm Iyéič’iyapi”) Activity Ideas Below Description

NOTE: Video player on this page only works using Internet Explorer browser. Use site below to view in different browsers.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Online

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


The Berenstain Bears Site (Click "Kids" for Activities) Flash – Use Internet Explorer.

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
When Mama and Papa refuse to buy Brother and Sister trendy overly expensive sport shirts, the cubs decide to earn the money themselves. However the cubs go overboard and get so caught up in everything from lemonade stands to dog walking services that they leave themselves no time for their friends. It’s only when they finally reach their goal that Brother and Sister realize the price tag has turned out to a lot bigger than they thought. Their blind pursuit of material things has cost them their friends. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla é na tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ ógle othéȟiȟika eyá čhíŋpi éyaš húŋkupi na atkúkupi opȟéwičhakičatȟuŋpi kte šni kéyapi. Ho čha iyéčhiŋka mázaska iglámnapi na opȟéič’itȟuŋpi kta gluštáŋpi. Sáŋm iyéič’iyapi na wówaši ečé ečhúŋpi čha ablézapišniyaŋ okȟólawičhayapi kiŋ átaya él éwičhawačhiŋpi šni. Haŋkéya táku čhíŋpi kiŋ hená yuhápi yuŋkȟáŋ tóhaŋni wóyuha ímnaič’iyapi kta okíhipi šni čha aíč’iblezapi. Okȟólawičhayapi na thiwáhe kiŋ hená é čha waŋkátuya wičháglawapi kta tkȟá.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Question: Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Answer: Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs (NOTE: Flash player – Use Internet Explorer.)

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version?

Visit your local library for the Berenstain Bears books.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Mondays, 2:00pm CT and Saturdays, 6:30am CT

The Lakota Berenstain Bears

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher.

(Search Terms - Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 6b - Double Dare (Sémni Eyá Wapáǧeyapi) Activity Ideas Below Description

NOTE: Video player on this page only works using Internet Explorer browser. Use site below to view in different browsers.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Online

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


The Berenstain Bears Site (Click "Kids" for Activities) Flash – Use Internet Explorer.

New Lakota Dictionary Online


Description:
Brother displays some real moxie when he attempts to get back Sister’s skipping rope from Too-Tall and his mischievous gang. Too-Tall thinks Brother has what it takes to join his gang. After Brother becomes a member he’s required to follow the leader...and that means trespassing on Farmer Ben’s property to swipe watermelons. Brother is the only one caught and Farmer Ben has a heart to heart talk with him about how to deal with peer pressure. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla tȟaŋkšítku čhaŋtét’iŋsya anákičikšiŋ na Háŋskela wíkȟaŋ inápsilyapi waŋ amánuŋ kiŋ hé ikíčiču wačhíŋ. Yuŋkȟáŋ Háŋskela waȟtéšni hokšíla optáye tȟáwa kiŋ Matȟó Hokšíla ópȟakhiye aphé. Matȟó Hokšíla iyówiŋyaŋ čha wóžu wičháša Ben tȟa-wóžu kiŋ ektá yíŋ na wagmúšpaŋšni manúŋ ší. Ho éyaš, wóžu wičháša Ben é čha Matȟó Hokšíla ečéla íyašlalyiŋ na tókhel wówiyutaŋ šíča etáŋ iglúȟeyapȟaya kta okíhi héči iwáhokuŋkhiye.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Question: Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Answer: Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs (NOTE: Flash player – Use Internet Explorer.)

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version?

Visit your local library for the Berenstain Bears books.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Mondays, 2:00pm CT and Saturdays, 6:30am CT

The Lakota Berenstain Bears

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher.

(Search Terms - Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 7a - Out For the Team (Tȟab’ápȟa Akíčhiyapi) Activity Ideas Below Description

NOTE: Video player on this page only works using Internet Explorer browser. Use site below to view in different browsers.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Online

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


The Berenstain Bears Site (Click "Kids" for Activities) Flash – Use Internet Explorer.

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
Brother and Sister are good baseball players and both sign up to try out for the Bear Country Cardinals. The problem is, there’s only one position left on the team. Worried about the humiliating possibility of losing to his talented kid sister, Brother backs out of the competition. Sister has some encouraging words for Brother which inspires him to stick with it. The two cubs practice for the big tryout together. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla é na tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ tȟab’ápȟa wóphikapi naháŋ nakúŋ nuphíŋ Bear Country Cardinals ób škátapi kte ȟčiŋ. Akšáka waŋžíla ópȟakhiyapi kte kéyapi yuŋkȟáŋ Matȟó Hokšíla tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ kȟapȟíŋ kte šni ikȟópȟa čha íyaikpat’o. Ho éyaš iyénayiŋ kte šni čha, tȟaŋkšítku glawáš’akiŋ na okášpe k’uŋ hé uŋmá kaȟníǧapi kte itȟókab ókičhiyapi na ptáyela iíglutȟapi.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Question: Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Answer: Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs (NOTE: Flash player – Use Internet Explorer.)

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version?

Visit your local library for the Berenstain Bears books.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Mondays, 2:00pm CT and Saturdays, 6:30am CT

The Lakota Berenstain Bears

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher.

(Search Terms - Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 7b - Count Their Blessings (Wówašte Glawápi) Activity Ideas Below Description

NOTE: Video player on this page only works using Internet Explorer browser. Use site below to view in different browsers.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Online

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


The Berenstain Bears Site (Click "Kids" for Activities) Flash – Use Internet Explorer.

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
Brother and Sister often complain that their friends have more things than they do. Mama and Papa tell them they should be thankful for all the things they do have. When a big thunderstorm rages outside and the power goes out, the cubs are reminded of how fortunate they are to have loving parents and a cozy home to live in. It’s a good time to count their blessings. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla é na tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ okȟólawičhayapi kiŋ wičhísaŋm wayúhapi čha ináwičhakiwizipi na iglášičapi. Húŋkupi na atkúkupi tákuni ičákižešniyaŋ úŋpi čha wičhákičiksuyapi na táku yuhápi kiŋ iyúha phikílapi kta iyéčheča kéyapi. Yuŋkȟáŋ Wakíŋyaŋ ukíyiŋ na líla maǧážu na tȟatéyaŋpa čha wakȟáŋgli waníče éyaš thimá tóna thewíčhaȟilapi na taŋyáŋ ičháȟwičhayapi kiŋ hená ób očhósya yaŋkápi. Ho čha hé uŋ tȟawáčhiŋ kiksúyapi na wówašte kiŋ iyúha glawápi na wóphila yuhápi.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Question: Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Answer: Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs (NOTE: Flash player – Use Internet Explorer.)

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version?

Visit your local library for the Berenstain Bears books.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Mondays, 2:00pm CT and Saturdays, 6:30am CT

The Lakota Berenstain Bears

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher.

(Search Terms - Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 8a - Slumber Party (Thiíyuŋg Wičhákičhopi) Activity Ideas Below Description

NOTE: Video player on this page only works using Internet Explorer browser. Use site below to view in different browsers.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Online

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


The Berenstain Bears Site (Click "Kids" for Activities) Flash – Use Internet Explorer.

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
Ensured by Sister that she knows the meaning of responsibility, Mama and Papa allow her to go to a sleep over at Lizzy’s house. However Mama and Papa are totally unaware that the Bruins have gone out and left a babysitter in charge. When practically every cub in town shows up at the party it gets so out of hand that when the Bruins return they call all the parents to come and take their cubs home. Although Mama and Papa agree that Sister is partially to blame, they also realize that if they had been a little more responsible themselves, they would have found out about the baby sitter early enough to nip it in the bud. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ maškéku Lizzy ečíyapi é čha thiíyuŋg kičhó. Húŋkupi na atkúkupi kiŋ ób wóglakiŋ na wówačhiŋye kéya wičháyaečheča čha haŋyúŋkiŋ kta iyówiŋkhiyapi. Ho éyaš Lizzy atkúku é na húŋku kiŋ tókhiyayapi na éeye wikȟóškalaka waŋ hokší-awaŋyaŋkiŋ kte éyaš slolyápi šni. Wičhákičhopi kiŋ ektá líla wičhóta yuŋkȟáŋ líla ok’óka ho čha Lizzy atkúku na húŋku khípi k’uŋ héhaŋ iyúha khigléwičhakhiyapi. Matȟó Hokšíla tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ uŋšpá iyáuŋpapi éyaš íŋš-eyá iyáuŋpephičapi čha aíč’iblezapi ičhíŋ Lizzy atkúku é na húŋku kiŋ él úŋpi kte šni čha slolyápi kta tkȟá.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Question: Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Answer: Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs (NOTE: Flash player – Use Internet Explorer.)

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version?

Visit your local library for the Berenstain Bears books.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Mondays, 2:00pm CT and Saturdays, 6:30am CT

The Lakota Berenstain Bears

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher.

(Search Terms - Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 8b - Homework Hassle (Wóuŋspe Wówaši) Activity Ideas Below Description

NOTE: Video player on this page only works using Internet Explorer browser. Use site below to view in different browsers.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Online

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


The Berenstain Bears Site (Click "Kids" for Activities) Flash – Use Internet Explorer.

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
Brother complains that he’s given too much homework and that’s why he has fallen so far behind at school. Papa blames it on his highly distractive study environment and until Brother gets caught up, there’ll be no television, video games, loud music or chatting on the phone. When Brother decides to do a little homework every night, he finds it’s much easier to stay on top of his workload. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla waúŋspekhiye kiŋ wówaši eháš óta yuhá thiyáta khiglékhiye s’a na uŋ owáyawa-ta taŋyáŋ iglóaye šni kéye. Atkúku kiŋ héčhetula šni na táku óta, wičhítenaškaŋškaŋ na wakȟáŋgli wóškate, na omás’apȟela, na wóolowaŋ kiŋ henákeča iyáuŋpe-phiča kéye. Ho čha ȟtayétu iyóhila haŋkéke awówaši ečhúŋ kta gluštáŋ k’uŋ heháŋtaŋ akhé taŋyáŋ wayúštaŋ s’eléčheča.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Question: Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Answer: Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs (NOTE: Flash player – Use Internet Explorer.)

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version?

Visit your local library for the Berenstain Bears books.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Mondays, 2:00pm CT and Saturdays, 6:30am CT

The Lakota Berenstain Bears

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher.

(Search Terms - Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 9a - The Talent Show (Wówayuphike Kpazópi) Activity Ideas Below Description

NOTE: Video player on this page only works using Internet Explorer browser. Use site below to view in different browsers.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Online

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


The Berenstain Bears Site (Click "Kids" for Activities) Flash – Use Internet Explorer.

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
Convinced that he doesn’t have any talent to offer for the upcoming school talent show, Brother is recruited to be the talent scout. Guided by Teacher Bob’s conviction that everyone has talent, Brother helps the other cubs discover their own special talents, and in so doing, discovers he also has a talent just as Teacher Bob suspected - a talent for finding talent. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Owáyawa-ta wówayuphike akíčhiyapi kta háŋl Matȟó Hokšíla ikpási yuŋkȟáŋ tákuni iwáyuphike šni ič’íla. Čha hé uŋ tóna takúku iwáyuphikapi héči hená owíčhale kta kaȟníǧapi. Hetáŋ tóna iyéwičhaya héči hená wówayuphike kiŋ iyékiyapi kta čha ówičhakiye. Ečhúŋhaŋ íŋš-eyá wówayuphike kiŋ iyékiye. Wówayuphike kiŋ iyékiyapi kta čha ówičhakiye kiŋ hé wówayuphike tȟáwa kiŋ hé é čha iyékiye.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Question: Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Answer: Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs (NOTE: Flash player – Use Internet Explorer.)

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version?

Visit your local library for the Berenstain Bears books.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Mondays, 2:00pm CT and Saturdays, 6:30am CT

The Lakota Berenstain Bears

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher.

(Search Terms - Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")
Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 9b - The Haunted Lighthouse (Thiyóžaŋžaŋ) Activity Ideas Below Description

NOTE: Video player on this page only works using Internet Explorer browser. Use site below to view in different browsers.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Online

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


The Berenstain Bears Site (Click "Kids" for Activities) Flash – Use Internet Explorer.

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
When the Bear Family vacations in an old lighthouse rendered obsolete by modern technology, they discover that it’s rumored to be haunted. Although the cubs encounter mysterious sights and sounds, they’re anything but spooked. In fact Brother and Sister actively pursue the clues to the point where they not only reveal the ’ghost’ but come up with a way to give new life to the old lighthouse as well as the old lighthouse keeper. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla thiwáhe kiŋ thiyóžaŋžaŋ waŋ ektá wóasnikiye yuhápi yuŋkȟáŋ hél naǧítȟuŋpi kéyapi čha naȟ’úŋpi. Táku okáȟniȟ-phiča šni séče kiŋ hená kȟokípȟapi šni éyaš éeye tókhel okíhipika iwápasipi na ečhél wanáǧi séče kiŋ yuákaŋl ičúpi. Naháŋ nakúŋ tókhel thiyóžaŋžaŋ tȟaŋníla kiŋ hé é na awáŋyaŋke kiŋ akhé uŋphíča héči oyákapi.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Question: Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Answer: Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs (NOTE: Flash player – Use Internet Explorer.)

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version?

Visit your local library for the Berenstain Bears books.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Mondays, 2:00pm CT and Saturdays, 6:30am CT

The Lakota Berenstain Bears

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher.

(Search Terms - Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")
Lakota Ceremonial Songs (Audio Only) In the early 1980s, two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College
and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were
performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior.
The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring
the spiritual practices back to all of the people. While this music is
preserved on tape, many of the elders like John Around Him are being lost.
After a battle with cancer, Around Him passed away. John Around Him had a
dream that all Lakota youth would be able to freely learn and speak their
language. Tribes of Dakota - Pine Ridge Reservation: Spiritual
Lakota Land (Click Link in Description to Access Video) Lakota Land: Stories of the Pine Ridge Reservation (Produced by Oglala Lakota College)
Click HERE for Online Video Series

Program Synopsis
1. Oonaghazee: The stronghold
2. Tin’psila: The importance of the prairie turnip to the Lakota People
3. Wanblee: A Pine Ridge community
4. Kyle: A Pine Ridge community
5. Buffalo Nation: The importance of the buffalo to the Lakota People
6. Day School: Education in the early days of the reservation
7. Oglala: A Pine Ridge community
8. Slime Buttes: An important natural feature on Pine Ridge
9. Pine Ridge: A Pine Ridge community
10. Red Shirt: A Pine Ridge community
11. Mako Sica/ The Badlands: An important natural feature on Pine Ridge
12. The Bombing Range: 300,000 Reservation acres were used by the US Military during WWII
13. Yellow Bear Canyon: An important natural feature on Pine Ridge
14. Wounded Knee: A Pine Ridge community
15. Delphine Red Cloud: An interview with the late elder and descendent of Red Cloud


South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1)
(Essential Understanding 2: OSEUS2)
(Essential Understanding 3: OSEUS3)
(Essential Understanding 4: OSEUS4)
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5)
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7)
Lakota Nation Invetational and M&S Website Activity ideas for the classroom and home.
Lakota Nation Invitational: Beyond The Game Panel Discussion
Last Draft, Last Bid: 92 Years at the Sioux Falls Stockyards Click for photos, additional video interviews and more.

On June 25, 2009, 21 black heifers were herded into the arena show ring at the Sioux Falls Stockyards. Offered for sale as a group, or draft, this consignment of cattle would be the last sold at the Sioux Falls Stockyards. A final bid was made and after 92 years of cattle sales at the facility, the auctioneer's gavel sounded for the last time.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Lesson Plan - A Hurt, a Ride, a Redeeming Reconciliation A Hurt, a Ride, a Redeeming Reconciliation - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - A Ride to Remember Lesson Plan - A Ride to Remember - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - Ancient Pockets of Sunlight Lesson Plan - Ancient Pockets of Sunlight - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created it. The lesson plan was developed by a staff member of the WoLakota Project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - Anpetu Waste, Selam, Hola, Namaste, Hello Lesson Plan - Anpetu Waste, Selam, Hola, Namaste, Hello - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 3: OSEUS3, OSEU3)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - Brother Eagle, Sister Sky: Story & The Environment Lesson Plan – Brother Eagle, Sister Sky: Story & The Environment- This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created it. The lesson plan was developed by a staff member of the WoLakota Project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 2 : OSEUS2, OSEU2)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - Climate Change, Weather & Unci Maka Lesson Plan - Climate Change, Weather & Unci Maka - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created it. The lesson plan was developed by a staff member of the WoLakota Project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - Dakota Wokiksuya Memorial Ride Lesson Plan - Dakota Wokiksuya Memorial Ride - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6, OSEU6)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - Dakota Wokiksuya Memorial Ride Song Lesson Plan - Dakota Wokiksuya Memorial Ride Song - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6, OSEU6)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - Do You See What I See? Lesson Plan - Do You See What I See? - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - Emotions of Remembrance: The Dakota Wokiksuye Memorial Ride Lesson Plan - Emotions of Remembrance: The Dakota Wokiksuye Memorial Ride - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - Fallen Star: A Lakota Star Legend Lesson Plan - Fallen Star: A Lakota Star Legend - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - Friend or Foe? Lesson Plan - Friend or Foe? - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Giants & Perseverance Lesson Plan – Giants & Perseverance - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created it. The lesson plan was developed by a staff member of the WoLakota Project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2 : OSEUS2, OSEU2)
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Grandmother’s Beads & The Mixed-Up Chameleon Lesson Plan – Grandmother’s Beads & The Mixed-Up Chameleon - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created it. The lesson plan was developed by a staff member of the WoLakota Project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 2 : OSEUS2, OSEU2)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Healing Lesson Plan – Healing - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - Homeostasis & The Medicine Wheel Lesson Plan - Homeostasis & The Medicine Wheel - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created it. The lesson plan was developed by a staff member of the WoLakota Project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 2 : OSEUS2, OSEU2)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – How the world came to be (Lakota Creation Story) Lesson Plan – How the world came to be (Lakota Creation Story) - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 3 : OSEUS3, OSEU3)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - In What’s In A Name? Lesson Plan - In What’s In A Name? - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created it. The lesson plan was developed by a staff member of the WoLakota Project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2 : OSEUS2, OSEU2)
(Essential Understanding 4: OSEUS4, OSEU4)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - Indigenous Expressions: Creating a Didgeridoo Lesson Plan – Indigenous Expressions: Creating a Didgeridoo - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created it. The lesson plan was developed by a staff member of the WoLakota Project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 2 : OSEUS2, OSEU2)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - Inferences, Beads & Community Lesson Plan - Inferences, Beads & Community - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created it. The lesson plan was developed by a staff member of the WoLakota Project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5 : OSEUS5, OSEU5)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Kinship’s role in the life of the Lakota. Lesson Plan – Kinship’s role in the life of the Lakota. - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6, OSEU6)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - Lakota Reservations Unit Lesson Plan - Lakota Reservations Unit - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 3: OSEUS3, OSEU3)
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6, OSEU6)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Lakota Reservations Unit Lesson Plan – Lakota Reservations Unit - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 3: OSEUS3, OSEU3)
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6, OSEU6)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Language & Talking Code Lesson Plan – Language & Talking Code - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created it. The lesson plan was developed by a staff member of the WoLakota Project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6 : OSEUS6, OSEU6)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Multicultural Mathematics and Lakota Number System Lesson Plan – Multicultural Mathematics and Lakota Number System - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6, OSEU6)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Oceti Sakowin and Titonwan Camp Circles Lesson Plan – Oceti Sakowin and Titonwan Camp Circles - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 3 : OSEUS3, OSEU3)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Oceti Sakowin Oyate Lesson Plan – Oceti Sakowin Oyate - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 3 : OSEUS3, OSEU3)
(Essential Understanding 5 : OSEUS5, OSEU5)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Oral History and the Wokiksuya Memorial Ride Lesson Plan – Oral History and the Wokiksuya Memorial Ride - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5 : OSEUS5, OSEU5)
(Essential Understanding 7 : OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Our Relatives the Stars Lesson Plan – Our Relatives the Stars - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created it. The lesson plan was developed by a staff member of the WoLakota Project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 3 : OSEUS3, OSEU3)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Pe Sla Lesson Plan – Pe Sla - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 2 : OSEUS2, OSEU2)
(Essential Understanding 3 : OSEUS3, OSEU3)
(Essential Understanding 5 : OSEUS5, OSEU5)
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6, OSEU6)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - Pe’Sla Past & Present: A Spiritual Connection to the Homeland Lesson Plan – Pe’Sla Past & Present: A Spiritual Connection to the Homeland - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 2 : OSEUS2, OSEU2)
(Essential Understanding 3 : OSEUS3, OSEU3)
(Essential Understanding 5 : OSEUS5, OSEU5)
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6, OSEU6)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – People Purchasing Pe’ Sla Lesson Plan – People Purchasing Pe’ Sla - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 2 : OSEUS2, OSEU2)
(Essential Understanding 3 : OSEUS3, OSEU3)
(Essential Understanding 5 : OSEUS5, OSEU5)
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6, OSEU6)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - Picturing Our Lives: Artistic Expression For Our Community Lesson Plan - Picturing Our Lives: Artistic Expression For Our Community - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created it. The lesson plan was developed by a staff member of the WoLakota Project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 2 : OSEUS2, OSEU2)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Plotting the Journey of the Four Brothers Using Distance vs. Time Graph Lesson Plan – Plotting the Journey of the Four Brothers Using Distance vs. Time Graphs - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 3 : OSEUS3, OSEU3)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Power of Words: Nomads Lesson Plan – Power of Words: Nomads - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2 : OSEUS2, OSEU2)
(Essential Understanding 3 : OSEUS4, OSEU4)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Priceless Places: The Purchase of Pe Sla Lesson Plan – Priceless Places: The Purchase of Pe Sla - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 2 : OSEUS2, OSEU2)
(Essential Understanding 3 : OSEUS3, OSEU3)
(Essential Understanding 5 : OSEUS5, OSEU5)
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6, OSEU6)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Rainbow Fish: Gifts & Interconnectedness Lesson Plan – Rainbow Fish: Gifts & Interconnectedness - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created it. The lesson plan was developed by a staff member of the WoLakota Project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 2 : OSEUS2, OSEU2)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Reconciliation Means Something to Everyone Lesson Plan – Reconciliation Means Something to Everyone - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2 : OSEUS2, OSEU2)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Reflections on Boarding Schools Lesson Plan – Reflections on Boarding Schools - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created it. The lesson plan was developed by a staff member of the WoLakota Project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2 : OSEUS2, OSEU2)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Reservations of the Oceti Śakowiŋ Lesson Plan – Reservations of the Oceti Śakowiŋ - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Resource Relationships 6th Grade Science Lesson on Natural Resources Lesson Plan – Resource Relationships 6th Grade Science Lesson on Natural Resources - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created it. The lesson plan was developed by a staff member of the WoLakota Project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Revisiting Historical Landmarks Lesson Plan – Revisiting Historical Landmarks - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5 : OSEUS5, OSEU5)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Rules To Live By Lesson Plan – Rules To Live By - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 3 : OSEUS3, OSEU3)
(Essential Understanding 4: OSEUS4, OSEU4)
(Essential Understanding 5 : OSEUS5, OSEU5)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Sacred Spaces Lesson Plan – Sacred Spaces - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 3 : OSEUS3, OSEU3)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Science and Language of the Emergence Story Lesson Plan – Science and Language of the Emergence Story - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 3 : OSEUS3, OSEU3)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - The Dakota Wokiksuya Memorial Ride Lesson Plan - The Dakota Wokiksuya Memorial Ride - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6, OSEU6)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - The Emergence Story Lesson Plan - The Emergence Story - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2: OSEUS2, OSEU2)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - The Freedom Writers & The Dakota Conflict of 1862 Lesson Plan - The Freedom Writers & The Dakota Conflict of 1862 - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created it. The lesson plan was developed by a staff member of the WoLakota Project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2 : OSEUS2, OSEU2)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – The Price of Promises Not Kept Lesson Plan – The Price of Promises Not Kept - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 2 : OSEUS2, OSEU2)
(Essential Understanding 3 : OSEUS3, OSEU3)
(Essential Understanding 5 : OSEUS5, OSEU5)
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6, OSEU6)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - Ancient Granite (6-12) Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - Ancient Granite (6-12) This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

About the Lesson:
In this lesson, students learn about the origin of the granite used in the project: they consider its age, do some mathematical thinking, and read scientific text about granite formation. Discussion support and critical thinking questions are included.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person who created it. Passage to Schools lessons have been developed in coordination with Rapid City High School teacher and Sculpture Project Advisory Committee member, Gabrielle Seeley. (More)

About the Project:
The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water (Video by Randall Iverson about the project) is a large-scale public art project at Main Street Square in the heart of downtown Rapid City. Stone sculptor Masayuki Nagase is carving the 21-piece granite sculpture on-site over five years, beginning in 2013.

Passage to Schools is a family of K-12 lesson plans that uses this work of public art to spark learning about literature, history, science and Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota culture. The downloadable lessons are dual-aligned to Common Core and Oceti Sakowin standards. Rapid City High School art and language teacher Gabrielle Seeley developed Passage to Schools.

To arrange a school visit to The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water at Main Street Square, or for more information about the curricula, contact Destination Rapid City’s Community Arts Coordinator Anna Huntington at anna@artsrapidcity.com

The project is funded through Destination Rapid City, the John T. Vucurevich Foundation, the Rapid City Public Schools Foundation and the South Dakota Arts Council.

Curriculum is made possible in part from a grant from the South Dakota Arts Council. SDAC support is provided with funds from the State of South Dakota, through the Department of Tourism, and the National Endowment for the Arts. The Rapid City Public School Foundation and Black Hills Community Bank also support the curriculum project.
Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - Field Trips! (K-12+) Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - Field Trips! (K-12+) This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

About the Lesson:
This lesson provides text for students to read before the day of a field trip to Main Street Square, critical thinking activities to work on while exploring The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water, and a graphic organizer for students to use in preparing for a discussion when they are back in the classroom.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person who created it. Passage to Schools lessons have been developed in coordination with Rapid City High School teacher and Sculpture Project Advisory Committee member, Gabrielle Seeley. (More)

About the Project:
The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water (Video by Randall Iverson about the project) is a large-scale public art project at Main Street Square in the heart of downtown Rapid City. Stone sculptor Masayuki Nagase is carving the 21-piece granite sculpture on-site over five years, beginning in 2013.

Passage to Schools is a family of K-12 lesson plans that uses this work of public art to spark learning about literature, history, science and Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota culture. The downloadable lessons are dual-aligned to Common Core and Oceti Sakowin standards. Rapid City High School art and language teacher Gabrielle Seeley developed Passage to Schools.

To arrange a school visit to The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water at Main Street Square, or for more information about the curricula, contact Destination Rapid City’s Community Arts Coordinator Anna Huntington at anna@artsrapidcity.com

The project is funded through Destination Rapid City, the John T. Vucurevich Foundation, the Rapid City Public Schools Foundation and the South Dakota Arts Council.

Curriculum is made possible in part from a grant from the South Dakota Arts Council. SDAC support is provided with funds from the State of South Dakota, through the Department of Tourism, and the National Endowment for the Arts. The Rapid City Public School Foundation and Black Hills Community Bank also support the curriculum project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - Food From Nature (3-5) Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - Food From Nature (3-5) This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

About the Lesson:
“Food from Nature” uses Passage of Wind and Water as a starting point for a discussion about people’s connections with nature. The lesson explores how people connect with nature through food grown outdoors. An excerpt from a 1933 text by Luther Standing Bear highlights the Oceti Sakowin people’s historical knowledge of natural food sources. Students make inferences about text and support their conclusions with reasoning and examples.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person who created it. Passage to Schools lessons have been developed in coordination with Rapid City High School teacher and Sculpture Project Advisory Committee member, Gabrielle Seeley. (More)

About the Project:
The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water (Video by Randall Iverson about the project) is a large-scale public art project at Main Street Square in the heart of downtown Rapid City. Stone sculptor Masayuki Nagase is carving the 21-piece granite sculpture on-site over five years, beginning in 2013.

Passage to Schools is a family of K-12 lesson plans that uses this work of public art to spark learning about literature, history, science and Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota culture. The downloadable lessons are dual-aligned to Common Core and Oceti Sakowin standards. Rapid City High School art and language teacher Gabrielle Seeley developed Passage to Schools.

To arrange a school visit to The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water at Main Street Square, or for more information about the curricula, contact Destination Rapid City’s Community Arts Coordinator Anna Huntington at anna@artsrapidcity.com

The project is funded through Destination Rapid City, the John T. Vucurevich Foundation, the Rapid City Public Schools Foundation and the South Dakota Arts Council.

Curriculum is made possible in part from a grant from the South Dakota Arts Council. SDAC support is provided with funds from the State of South Dakota, through the Department of Tourism, and the National Endowment for the Arts. The Rapid City Public School Foundation and Black Hills Community Bank also support the curriculum project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 2 : OSEUS2, OSEU2)
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - Lakota Connections with Nature (6-12) Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - Lakota Connections with Nature (6-12) This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

About the Lesson:
In this lesson, students read a piece of informational text which includes an excerpt of a primary source document by Luther Standing Bear. Questions requiring critical thinking and textual analysis are provided, as is a graphic organizer to help students prepare for meaningful discussions.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person who created it. Passage to Schools lessons have been developed in coordination with Rapid City High School teacher and Sculpture Project Advisory Committee member, Gabrielle Seeley. (More)

About the Project:
The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water (Video by Randall Iverson about the project) is a large-scale public art project at Main Street Square in the heart of downtown Rapid City. Stone sculptor Masayuki Nagase is carving the 21-piece granite sculpture on-site over five years, beginning in 2013.

Passage to Schools is a family of K-12 lesson plans that uses this work of public art to spark learning about literature, history, science and Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota culture. The downloadable lessons are dual-aligned to Common Core and Oceti Sakowin standards. Rapid City High School art and language teacher Gabrielle Seeley developed Passage to Schools.

To arrange a school visit to The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water at Main Street Square, or for more information about the curricula, contact Destination Rapid City’s Community Arts Coordinator Anna Huntington at anna@artsrapidcity.com

The project is funded through Destination Rapid City, the John T. Vucurevich Foundation, the Rapid City Public Schools Foundation and the South Dakota Arts Council.

Curriculum is made possible in part from a grant from the South Dakota Arts Council. SDAC support is provided with funds from the State of South Dakota, through the Department of Tourism, and the National Endowment for the Arts. The Rapid City Public School Foundation and Black Hills Community Bank also support the curriculum project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - Linking Poetry with Public Art (6-12) Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - Linking Poetry with Public Art (6-12) This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

About the Lesson:
Here, students engage with poetry from Matsuo Basho, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Billy Mills and Octavio Paz that spans three centuries and four distinct cultures. Students are supported with questions that require them to think critically and analytically about the texts; the graphic organizer leads to a discussion of students' own metacognition.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person who created it. Passage to Schools lessons have been developed in coordination with Rapid City High School teacher and Sculpture Project Advisory Committee member, Gabrielle Seeley. (More)

About the Project:
The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water (Video by Randall Iverson about the project) is a large-scale public art project at Main Street Square in the heart of downtown Rapid City. Stone sculptor Masayuki Nagase is carving the 21-piece granite sculpture on-site over five years, beginning in 2013.

Passage to Schools is a family of K-12 lesson plans that uses this work of public art to spark learning about literature, history, science and Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota culture. The downloadable lessons are dual-aligned to Common Core and Oceti Sakowin standards. Rapid City High School art and language teacher Gabrielle Seeley developed Passage to Schools.

To arrange a school visit to The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water at Main Street Square, or for more information about the curricula, contact Destination Rapid City’s Community Arts Coordinator Anna Huntington at anna@artsrapidcity.com

The project is funded through Destination Rapid City, the John T. Vucurevich Foundation, the Rapid City Public Schools Foundation and the South Dakota Arts Council.

Curriculum is made possible in part from a grant from the South Dakota Arts Council. SDAC support is provided with funds from the State of South Dakota, through the Department of Tourism, and the National Endowment for the Arts. The Rapid City Public School Foundation and Black Hills Community Bank also support the curriculum project.

Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - Observing Animals (3-5) Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - Observing Animals (3-5) This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

About the Lesson:
This lesson begins with sculptor Masayuki Nagase’s visual themes, wind and water, and asks students to think about the connections with nature that they share with animals. Students read an excerpt from Luther Standing Bear’s My Indian Boyhood and are asked to think about what animals and people have in common. Critical thinking activities, vocabulary support, and a graphic organizer for discussion preparation are all included.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person who created it. Passage to Schools lessons have been developed in coordination with Rapid City High School teacher and Sculpture Project Advisory Committee member, Gabrielle Seeley. (More)

About the Project:
The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water (Video by Randall Iverson about the project) is a large-scale public art project at Main Street Square in the heart of downtown Rapid City. Stone sculptor Masayuki Nagase is carving the 21-piece granite sculpture on-site over five years, beginning in 2013.

Passage to Schools is a family of K-12 lesson plans that uses this work of public art to spark learning about literature, history, science and Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota culture. The downloadable lessons are dual-aligned to Common Core and Oceti Sakowin standards. Rapid City High School art and language teacher Gabrielle Seeley developed Passage to Schools.

To arrange a school visit to The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water at Main Street Square, or for more information about the curricula, contact Destination Rapid City’s Community Arts Coordinator Anna Huntington at anna@artsrapidcity.com

The project is funded through Destination Rapid City, the John T. Vucurevich Foundation, the Rapid City Public Schools Foundation and the South Dakota Arts Council.

Curriculum is made possible in part from a grant from the South Dakota Arts Council. SDAC support is provided with funds from the State of South Dakota, through the Department of Tourism, and the National Endowment for the Arts. The Rapid City Public School Foundation and Black Hills Community Bank also support the curriculum project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - Oceti Sakowin Kinship Systems (6-12) Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - Oceti Sakowin Kinship Systems (6-12) This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

About the Lesson:
This lesson uses excerpts from ethnographer Ella Cara Deloria's text, Waterlily, along with informational text to give students an understanding of the benefits and responsibilities inherent in Lakota kinship systems. Rich in high-level vocabulary, this lesson includes critical thinking questions and discussion preparation support.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person who created it. Passage to Schools lessons have been developed in coordination with Rapid City High School teacher and Sculpture Project Advisory Committee member, Gabrielle Seeley. (More)

About the Project:
The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water (Video by Randall Iverson about the project.) is a large-scale public art project at Main Street Square in the heart of downtown Rapid City. Stone sculptor Masayuki Nagase is carving the 21-piece granite sculpture on-site over five years, beginning in 2013.

Passage to Schools is a family of K-12 lesson plans that uses this work of public art to spark learning about literature, history, science and Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota culture. The downloadable lessons are dual-aligned to Common Core and Oceti Sakowin standards. Rapid City High School art and language teacher Gabrielle Seeley developed Passage to Schools.

To arrange a school visit to The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water at Main Street Square, or for more information about the curricula, contact Destination Rapid City’s Community Arts Coordinator Anna Huntington at anna@artsrapidcity.com

The project is funded through Destination Rapid City, the John T. Vucurevich Foundation, the Rapid City Public Schools Foundation and the South Dakota Arts Council.

Curriculum is made possible in part from a grant from the South Dakota Arts Council. SDAC support is provided with funds from the State of South Dakota, through the Department of Tourism, and the National Endowment for the Arts. The Rapid City Public School Foundation and Black Hills Community Bank also support the curriculum project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 4 : OSEUS4, OSEU4)
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
OSEUS, OSEU

Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - Preserving Shared Values (3-5) Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - Preserving Shared Values (3-5) This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

About the Lesson:
As a work of public art, Passage of Wind and Water invites us to think about our community’s shared values. This lesson draws a parallel to storytelling and the role of oral history in helping people understand and pass on Oceti Sakowin culture. “Preserving Shared Values” includes original text from ethnologist and Lakota scholar Ella Cara Deloria.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person who created it. Passage to Schools lessons have been developed in coordination with Rapid City High School teacher and Sculpture Project Advisory Committee member, Gabrielle Seeley. (More)

About the Project:
The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water (Video by Randall Iverson about the project) is a large-scale public art project at Main Street Square in the heart of downtown Rapid City. Stone sculptor Masayuki Nagase is carving the 21-piece granite sculpture on-site over five years, beginning in 2013.

Passage to Schools is a family of K-12 lesson plans that uses this work of public art to spark learning about literature, history, science and Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota culture. The downloadable lessons are dual-aligned to Common Core and Oceti Sakowin standards. Rapid City High School art and language teacher Gabrielle Seeley developed Passage to Schools.

To arrange a school visit to The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water at Main Street Square, or for more information about the curricula, contact Destination Rapid City’s Community Arts Coordinator Anna Huntington at anna@artsrapidcity.com

The project is funded through Destination Rapid City, the John T. Vucurevich Foundation, the Rapid City Public Schools Foundation and the South Dakota Arts Council.

Curriculum is made possible in part from a grant from the South Dakota Arts Council. SDAC support is provided with funds from the State of South Dakota, through the Department of Tourism, and the National Endowment for the Arts. The Rapid City Public School Foundation and Black Hills Community Bank also support the curriculum project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 4 : OSEUS4, OSEU4)
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - Project Overview Lesson (6-12) Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - Project Overview Lesson (6-12) This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

About the Lesson:
This lesson includes informational text about the The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water and includes critical thinking activities and a graphic organizer to strengthen student discussion about both the reading and about the project overall.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person who created it. Passage to Schools lessons have been developed in coordination with Rapid City High School teacher and Sculpture Project Advisory Committee member, Gabrielle Seeley. (More)

About the Project:
The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water (Video by Randall Iverson about the project) is a large-scale public art project at Main Street Square in the heart of downtown Rapid City. Stone sculptor Masayuki Nagase is carving the 21-piece granite sculpture on-site over five years, beginning in 2013.

Passage to Schools is a family of K-12 lesson plans that uses this work of public art to spark learning about literature, history, science and Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota culture. The downloadable lessons are dual-aligned to Common Core and Oceti Sakowin standards. Rapid City High School art and language teacher Gabrielle Seeley developed Passage to Schools.

To arrange a school visit to The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water at Main Street Square, or for more information about the curricula, contact Destination Rapid City’s Community Arts Coordinator Anna Huntington at anna@artsrapidcity.com

The project is funded through Destination Rapid City, the John T. Vucurevich Foundation, the Rapid City Public Schools Foundation and the South Dakota Arts Council.

Curriculum is made possible in part from a grant from the South Dakota Arts Council. SDAC support is provided with funds from the State of South Dakota, through the Department of Tourism, and the National Endowment for the Arts. The Rapid City Public School Foundation and Black Hills Community Bank also support the curriculum project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
OSEUS, OSEU


Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - Thinking about Natural Forces (6-12) Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - Thinking about Natural Forces (6-12) This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

About the Lesson:
Students use informational text and unbiased information to think about natural forces in new ways; an excerpt of a Lakota origin story engages students in considering the value of origin stories from all cultures. Included are a graphic organizer about natural forces and questions requiring personal observations and literary analysis.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person who created it. Passage to Schools lessons have been developed in coordination with Rapid City High School teacher and Sculpture Project Advisory Committee member, Gabrielle Seeley. (More)

About the Project:
The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water (Video by Randall Iverson about the project.) is a large-scale public art project at Main Street Square in the heart of downtown Rapid City. Stone sculptor Masayuki Nagase is carving the 21-piece granite sculpture on-site over five years, beginning in 2013.

Passage to Schools is a family of K-12 lesson plans that uses this work of public art to spark learning about literature, history, science and Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota culture. The downloadable lessons are dual-aligned to Common Core and Oceti Sakowin standards. Rapid City High School art and language teacher Gabrielle Seeley developed Passage to Schools.

To arrange a school visit to The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water at Main Street Square, or for more information about the curricula, contact Destination Rapid City’s Community Arts Coordinator Anna Huntington at anna@artsrapidcity.com

The project is funded through Destination Rapid City, the John T. Vucurevich Foundation, the Rapid City Public Schools Foundation and the South Dakota Arts Council.

Curriculum is made possible in part from a grant from the South Dakota Arts Council. SDAC support is provided with funds from the State of South Dakota, through the Department of Tourism, and the National Endowment for the Arts. The Rapid City Public School Foundation and Black Hills Community Bank also support the curriculum project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 3 : OSEUS3, OSEU3)
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
OSEUS, OSEU

Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - We Eat Food From Nature (K-2) Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - We Eat Food From Nature (K-2) This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

About the Lesson:
The Sculpture Project asks people to consider their connections to nature. In this lesson, students are encouraged to think about their own connections to nature by reading both informational and primary source text about how Lakota people have gathered and eaten food grown in nature.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person who created it. Passage to Schools lessons have been developed in coordination with Rapid City High School teacher and Sculpture Project Advisory Committee member, Gabrielle Seeley. (More)

About the Project:
The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water (Video by Randall Iverson about the project) is a large-scale public art project at Main Street Square in the heart of downtown Rapid City. Stone sculptor Masayuki Nagase is carving the 21-piece granite sculpture on-site over five years, beginning in 2013.

Passage to Schools is a family of K-12 lesson plans that uses this work of public art to spark learning about literature, history, science and Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota culture. The downloadable lessons are dual-aligned to Common Core and Oceti Sakowin standards. Rapid City High School art and language teacher Gabrielle Seeley developed Passage to Schools.

To arrange a school visit to The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water at Main Street Square, or for more information about the curricula, contact Destination Rapid City’s Community Arts Coordinator Anna Huntington at anna@artsrapidcity.com

The project is funded through Destination Rapid City, the John T. Vucurevich Foundation, the Rapid City Public Schools Foundation and the South Dakota Arts Council.

Curriculum is made possible in part from a grant from the South Dakota Arts Council. SDAC support is provided with funds from the State of South Dakota, through the Department of Tourism, and the National Endowment for the Arts. The Rapid City Public School Foundation and Black Hills Community Bank also support the curriculum project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 5 : OSEUS5, OSEU5)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - We Learn From Animals (K-2) Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - We Learn From Animals (K-2) This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

About the Lesson:
With this lesson, students think about what animals can teach us about personal responsibility. The Sculpture Project invites us to think about the connection between people and nature. In this lesson students read an historical text by Luther Standing Bear and think about their behavioral connections to animals.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person who created it. Passage to Schools lessons have been developed in coordination with Rapid City High School teacher and Sculpture Project Advisory Committee member, Gabrielle Seeley. (More)

About the Project:
The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water (Video by Randall Iverson about the project) is a large-scale public art project at Main Street Square in the heart of downtown Rapid City. Stone sculptor Masayuki Nagase is carving the 21-piece granite sculpture on-site over five years, beginning in 2013.

Passage to Schools is a family of K-12 lesson plans that uses this work of public art to spark learning about literature, history, science and Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota culture. The downloadable lessons are dual-aligned to Common Core and Oceti Sakowin standards. Rapid City High School art and language teacher Gabrielle Seeley developed Passage to Schools.

To arrange a school visit to The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water at Main Street Square, or for more information about the curricula, contact Destination Rapid City’s Community Arts Coordinator Anna Huntington at anna@artsrapidcity.com

The project is funded through Destination Rapid City, the John T. Vucurevich Foundation, the Rapid City Public Schools Foundation and the South Dakota Arts Council.

Curriculum is made possible in part from a grant from the South Dakota Arts Council. SDAC support is provided with funds from the State of South Dakota, through the Department of Tourism, and the National Endowment for the Arts. The Rapid City Public School Foundation and Black Hills Community Bank also support the curriculum project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - We Share With Others (K-2) Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - We Share With Others (K-2) This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

About the Lesson:
This lesson guides students in an exploration of what it means to share. As The Sculpture Project asks the local community to explore shared values, this lesson uses text from ethnologist and Lakota scholar Ella Cara Deloria to help students think about the value of generosity and how people share and pass on their values.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person who created it. Passage to Schools lessons have been developed in coordination with Rapid City High School teacher and Sculpture Project Advisory Committee member, Gabrielle Seeley. (More)

About the Project:
The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water (Video by Randall Iverson about the project) is a large-scale public art project at Main Street Square in the heart of downtown Rapid City. Stone sculptor Masayuki Nagase is carving the 21-piece granite sculpture on-site over five years, beginning in 2013.

Passage to Schools is a family of K-12 lesson plans that uses this work of public art to spark learning about literature, history, science and Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota culture. The downloadable lessons are dual-aligned to Common Core and Oceti Sakowin standards. Rapid City High School art and language teacher Gabrielle Seeley developed Passage to Schools.

To arrange a school visit to The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water at Main Street Square, or for more information about the curricula, contact Destination Rapid City’s Community Arts Coordinator Anna Huntington at anna@artsrapidcity.com

The project is funded through Destination Rapid City, the John T. Vucurevich Foundation, the Rapid City Public Schools Foundation and the South Dakota Arts Council.

Curriculum is made possible in part from a grant from the South Dakota Arts Council. SDAC support is provided with funds from the State of South Dakota, through the Department of Tourism, and the National Endowment for the Arts. The Rapid City Public School Foundation and Black Hills Community Bank also support the curriculum project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 4 : OSEUS4, OSEU4)
(Essential Understanding 5 : OSEUS5, OSEU5)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - We Show Our Thinking (K-5) Lesson Plan - The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water - We Show Our Thinking (K-5) This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

About the Lesson:
Students read informational text about the importance of showing others their original thinking. Using a graphic organizer, students learn the value of each thinker and of appreciating the thinking of others. They can prepare for a peer discussion of their thoughts about learning on a second, included graphic.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person who created it. Passage to Schools lessons have been developed in coordination with Rapid City High School teacher and Sculpture Project Advisory Committee member, Gabrielle Seeley. (More)

About the Project:
The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water (Video by Randall Iverson about the project) is a large-scale public art project at Main Street Square in the heart of downtown Rapid City. Stone sculptor Masayuki Nagase is carving the 21-piece granite sculpture on-site over five years, beginning in 2013.

Passage to Schools is a family of K-12 lesson plans that uses this work of public art to spark learning about literature, history, science and Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota culture. The downloadable lessons are dual-aligned to Common Core and Oceti Sakowin standards. Rapid City High School art and language teacher Gabrielle Seeley developed Passage to Schools.

To arrange a school visit to The Sculpture Project: Passage of Wind and Water at Main Street Square, or for more information about the curricula, contact Destination Rapid City’s Community Arts Coordinator Anna Huntington at anna@artsrapidcity.com

The project is funded through Destination Rapid City, the John T. Vucurevich Foundation, the Rapid City Public Schools Foundation and the South Dakota Arts Council.

Curriculum is made possible in part from a grant from the South Dakota Arts Council. SDAC support is provided with funds from the State of South Dakota, through the Department of Tourism, and the National Endowment for the Arts. The Rapid City Public School Foundation and Black Hills Community Bank also support the curriculum project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2 : OSEUS2, OSEU2)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – The Seven Nations of the Oceti Sakowin Lesson Plan – The Seven Nations of the Oceti Sakowin - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 3 : OSEUS3, OSEU3)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – The Story of the Giants Lesson Plan – The Story of the Giants - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created it. The lesson plan was developed by a staff member of the WoLakota Project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5 : OSEUS5, OSEU5)
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6, OSEU6)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – The Three R’s; Riding Remembering and Reconciliation Lesson Plan – The Three R’s; Riding Remembering and Reconciliation - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2 : OSEUS2, OSEU2)
(Essential Understanding 4 : OSEUS4, OSEU4)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – The Yankton's Council with Lewis and Clark Lesson Plan – The Yankton's Council with Lewis and Clark - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5 : OSEUS5, OSEU5)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – There’s No Place Like Home Lesson Plan – There’s No Place Like Home - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 3 : OSEUS3, OSEU3)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Using Original Allotments to Calculate Perimeter & Area Lesson Plan – Using Original Allotments to Calculate Perimeter & Area - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5 : OSEUS5, OSEU5)
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6, OSEU6)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – We Are Family: Kinship Terms Lesson Plan – We Are Family: Kinship Terms - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created it. The lesson plan was developed by a staff member of the WoLakota Project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 4 : OSEUS4, OSEU4)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Where are you? Lesson Plan – Where are you? - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6, OSEU6)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Who I am Lesson Plan – Who I am - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 3 : OSEUS3, OSEU3)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Will You Be My Friend? A Look at the Yanktons’ Council with Lewis and Clark Lesson Plan – Will You Be My Friend? A Look at the Yanktons’ Council with Lewis and Clark- This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 5 : OSEUS5, OSEU5)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - Winter Count & Wilfred Gordon McDonald Partridge Lesson Plan – Winter Count & Wilfred Gordon McDonald Partridge - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created it. The lesson plan was developed by a staff member of the WoLakota Project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5 : OSEUS5, OSEU5)
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6, OSEU6)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan - Winter Count Language Arts & Social Science Lesson Lesson Plan – Winter Count Language Arts & Social Science Lesson - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created it. The lesson plan was developed by a staff member of the WoLakota Project.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6 : OSEUS6, OSEU6)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Winter Count: an Introduction (Making a Class “Week Count” oko iyawapi) Lesson Plan – Winter Count: an Introduction (Making a Class “Week Count” oko iyawapi) - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6, OSEU6)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Winter Counts - Waniyetu Wowapi Lesson Plan – Winter Counts - Waniyetu Wowapi - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6, OSEU6)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Wokiksuya and You Lesson Plan – Wokiksuya and You - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6, OSEU6)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan – Woyaksape for Wokiksuya Lesson Plan – Woyaksape for Wokiksuya - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6, OSEU6)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
OSEUS, OSEU
Lesson Plan: Accepting Responsibility Accepting Responsibility - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2: OSEUS2, OSEU2)
Lesson Plan: All My Relatives All My Relatives - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 4: OSEUS4, OSEU4)
Lesson Plan: Analyzing Dream Woman’s character in Ella Cara Deloria’s Waterlily Analyzing Dream Woman’s character in Ella Cara Deloria’s Waterlily - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
Lesson Plan: Appropriation and Misappropriation of Indian Imagery - From Lakota Winter Counts to Indian Mascots Appropriation and Misappropriation of Indian Imagery: From Lakota Winter Counts to Indian Mascots - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2: OSEUS2, OSEU2)
Lesson Plan: Attacking Stereotypes - Lakotas Depicted in Hollywood Films Attacking Stereotypes - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2: OSEUS2, OSEU2)
Lesson Plan: Catching the Prey Lesson Plan: Catching the Prey

Provided by the South Dakota State Historical Society

Lesson Plan
(Lessons also found lower left - PDF)

Objectives:
• Participants will recognize the hunting challenges early Plains inhabitants faced.
• Participants will illustrate hunting challenges through role playing as hunter/prey.
• Participants will assess how their various senses help them in each role.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1)

SDSHSLesson
Lesson Plan: Ceremonial Aspects of Lakota Culture - An Approach to Curriculum Development Ceremonial Aspects of Lakota Culture: An Approach to Curriculum Development - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 3: OSEUS3, OSEU3)
Lesson Plan: Ceremonial Aspects of Lakota of Lakota Culture - Unit 1 Purification Lodge Ceremonial Aspects of Lakota of Lakota Culture: Unit 1 Purification Lodge - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 3: OSEUS3, OSEU3)
Lesson Plan: Ceremonial Lesson Plan Ceremonial Lesson Plan - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 3: OSEUS3, OSEU3)
Lesson Plan: Class Winter Count South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6)

Winter Count Lessons

Lesson Plan: Class Winter Count

“Click” Lesson Plan and Score Sheet (lower left in the table below the player)

Background: A winter count is a pictographic record of historical/memorable events for a tiospaye (community). The pictures, which were used as mnemonic devices, are arranged in chronological order. Originally, the memorable events were recorded on rock (many paintings found on cave walls, canyons and mountains throughout the Great Plains), on buffalo hide, deer hide, cow hide, and then ledger paper and muslin (cotton fabric).

Each tiospaye designated a winter count keeper. The keeper (traditionally a man) of the winter count was the historian for the community. Elders would gather and consult with the keeper to select the most important event of the year (first snow to first snow). The keeper would then draw an image on the winter count to represent the event. The images on the winter count were used as a reminder/aide to help the keeper remember the events. The keeper (oral historian) could then explain the events in detail.

Additional background information and materials: Lesson Plan PDF - lower left

Procedure: During this lesson the students will create their own winter count image by identifying an important event that occurred in their lives during the school year. The students will present their winter count image to the class. Parents, guardians, and elders will be invited to attend the presentations. The presentation attendees and the students will choose/identify a Winter Count Keeper for the Class Winter Count. The chosen Keeper will record their image on the Class Winter Count.

Setup/Process
1. Each student will identify an important event that occurred, within the school year, in their life, at school or in the community. (Examples: State BB Championship, death of someone from the community, new school building, etc.)
2. The students will use paper or cloth to create their winter count image. (8.5”X11” – easy to scan)
3. Displaying the images for the presentations:
a. Scan/photograph the images
b. Place all of the images in one PowerPoint Presentation. (Larger poster boards could be used to make the original drawings if a PowerPoint program is not available for the presentations.)
4. Invite parents, guardians, elders, etc. to attend the presentations.
5. Have each student explain their image when it is displayed on the PowerPoint presentation. They should explain why they chose the event and how the image will help them remember the event in the future.
6. The attendees should make notes, of each winter count image, so they will be able to vote for their favorite image.
7. Each attendee should cast an anonymous vote for their favorite winter count image. Collect and tally the votes. (Traditional – not anonymous)
8. The student with the most votes will become the Winter Count Keeper for the year. They will record their image on a large Class Winter Count which should be displayed in a prominent location. Make a Class Winter Count out of a sheet or a large piece of paper. Lone Dog’s Winter Count is shown below for design ideas.
9. A new Keeper is chosen each year to add an image to the Class Winter Count.

What to expect: The students should realize that time and effort is taken to create an image that will spark the memory of the Keeper because the Keeper is responsible for providing an oral account of the images drawn. The Keeper of the winter count incorporates their personal history, artistic talent and visual interpretation of the event into their image. The attendees are the elders who help select/identify the most important event for the year
Lesson Plan: Constellations, Sacred Sites and the stories of the Oceti Sakowin Constellations, Sacred Sites and the stories of the Oceti Sakowin - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards

(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1, OSEU1)
Lesson Plan: Dakota, Nakota, Lakota Life (Beadwork Designs) Lesson Plan: Dakota, Nakota, Lakota Life (Beadwork Designs)

Provided by the South Dakota State Historical Society

Lesson Plan
(Lesson also found lower left - PDF)

Objectives:
• Participants will explain in their own words the relationship between beadwork and quillwork.
• Participants will identify eight designs used in Sioux beadwork.
• Participants will design their own beadwork pattern.

Background Information:

Porcupine quills are smooth hollow tubes with a barbed point on one end. After being colored with natural dyes, the quills were wrapped, braided, or sewn onto clothing and household objects. Quill designs used bars, oblongs and rectangles. Until white traders brought colorful beads to trade in the 1830s, quillwork predominated over beadwork.

The first beadwork was done in long, narrow bands using the same bars, oblongs and rectangles seen in quillwork. The squares and rectangles were often surrounded by a border of contrasting color. The bands of beadwork were used on leggings, robes and blankets, pipe bags, cradles and saddle bags. In the 1880s, Sioux beadwork designs adopted new elements. Elongated diamonds and pronged designs were used along with traditional rectangles, squares, triangles, and lines. The hourglass design also developed. A wider variety of colors began to be used, with green, yellow, and blue joining the favorite red. White was the most common background color with medium or light blue the next favorite background.

Activity Steps:
1. Share the background information with the group. Discuss:
- What was used to decorate items before traders brought beads?
- What kinds of designs were used in quillwork and early beadwork?
2. Give each participant a copy of the Beading Designs Worksheet to complete. When everyone has finished the worksheet, discuss:
Dakota, Nakota, Lakota Life
South Dakota State Historical Society Education Kit
- Do the design names make sense when you see the design?
- What are some of the designs that were inspired by natural things? (dragonfly, turtle, lightning)
- What are some of the designs inspired by manmade things? (tipi)
3. Have each participant use their crayons or markers to create their own beadwork design on drawing paper. They can use designs from the worksheet as well as the ones described in the background information – rectangles, oblongs, squares, triangles, diamonds and lines. Common beadwork colors would include red, blue, yellow, and green, but other colors may also be used

SouthSouth Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards (OSEUS)

SDSHSLesson
Lesson Plan: Devils Tower and the Struggle Over the Protection of Sacred Lakota Sites in Nature Devils Tower and the Struggle Over the Protection of Sacred Lakota Sites in Nature - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 3: OSEUS3, OSEU3)
Lesson Plan: Dream Pictures Dream Pictures - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 3: OSEUS3, OSEU3)
Lesson Plan: Ecological, Geographical, and Cultural Importance of Pipestone, MN Ecological, Geographical, and Cultural Importance of Pipestone, MN:Completing the Circle of Prairie Life - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1, OSEU1)
Lesson Plan: Educational Aspects Educational Aspects - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2: OSEUS2, OSEU2)
Lesson Plan: Erasing Native American Stereotypes Lesson Plan: Erasing Native American Stereotypes

Provided by the South Dakota State Historical Society

Lesson Plan
(Lessons also found lower left - PDF)

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2: OSEUS2)
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5)

SDSHSLesson
Lesson Plan: Establishment of the Four Winds Establishment of the Four Winds - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
Lesson Plan: Everything is related - Lakotas and the buffalo. Everything is related: Lakotas and the buffalo - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 4: OSEUS4, OSEU4)
Lesson Plan: Exploring Environmental and Spiritual Relationships in Lakota Art Exploring Environmental and Spiritual Relationships in Lakota Art - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1, OSEU1)



Lesson Plan: Exploring Math, Science, History and Language Arts through Lakota Art Exploring Math, Science, History and Language Arts through Lakota Art - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7, OSEU7)
Lesson Plan: Han, Unci! Han, Tunkasila! Han, Unci! Han, Tunkasila! - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 4: OSEUS4, OSEU4)
Lesson Plan: Historic and Contemporary Art of the Oceti Sakowin Cultures Historic and Contemporary Art of the Oceti Sakowin Cultures - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
Lesson Plan: How Big Is a Buffalo? Provided by the South Dakota State Historical Society

How Big Is a Buffalo? Coloring Sheet Activity
Lesson Plan / Buffalo Head Sections

(Lessons also found lower left - PDFs)

Objectives:
- Participants will identify and use six different colors
- Participants will follow written color cues to correctly color individual worksheets
- Participants will cooperate to place sheets in order needed to form a buffalo head

Extended Lesson: Buffalo Fractions
- Participants will examine a grid to answer math questions
- Participants will use visual clues to determine fractions
- Participants will practice reducing fractions

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1)
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6)

SDSHSLesson
Lesson Plan: How Many Jackrabbits Equal One Buffalo? Lesson Plan: How Many Jackrabbits Equal One Buffalo? (Animal Weight Comparisons)

Provided by the South Dakota State Historical Society

Lesson Plan
(Lessons also found lower left - PDF)

Objectives:
• Participants will identify five creatures that share a buffalo’s prairie environment.
• Participants will convert weight from pound to ounces to grams.
• Participants will compare weights and determine how many of each creature weigh the equivalent of one buffalo.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1)
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6)

SDSHSLesson
Lesson Plan: Hu’tanacute Hu’tanacute - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
Lesson Plan: Integrity - A Lakota Value Integrity: A Lakota Value - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 3: OSEUS3, OSEU3)
Lesson Plan: Interconnectivity of Lakota Language, Culture, History, and Place in Joseph Marshall III’s, The Day the World Ended at Little Bighorn - A Lakota History Interconnectivity of Lakota Language, Culture, History, and Place in Joseph Marshall III’s, The Day the World Ended at Little Bighorn: A Lakota History - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 3: OSEUS3, OSEU3)
Lesson Plan: Lakota culture and preservation at the Duhamel Sioux Indian Pageant, 1934-1955. Lakota culture and preservation at the Duhamel Sioux Indian Pageant, 1934-1955 - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
Lesson Plan: Lakota Ethnoastronomy Lakota Ethnoastronomy - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 3: OSEUS3, OSEU3)
Lesson Plan: Lakota Kinship Lakota Kinship - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 4: OSEUS4, OSEU4)
Lesson Plan: Lakota Kinship and Childhood Education Lakota Kinship and Childhood Education - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 4: OSEUS4, OSEU4)
Lesson Plan: Lakota Values for the Classroom Lakota Values for the Classroom - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2: OSEUS2, OSEU2)
Lesson Plan: Lakota Winter Count Lakota Winter Count - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left. (Additional Resources)

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)

Lesson Plan: Lakota Winter Counts - An Alternative View of History Lakota Winter Counts: An Alternative View of History - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left. (Additional Resources)

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
Lesson Plan: Ledger Art - Past-to-Present Ledger Art: Past-to-Present - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
Lesson Plan: Mitakuye Oyasin and the Creation of the Universe Mitakuye Oyasin and the Creation of the Universe - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards

(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1, OSEU1)
Lesson Plan: Mitakuye Oyasin: All My Relatives Mitakuye Oyasin: All My Relatives - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1, OSEU1)
Lesson Plan: Oceti Sakowin in Present Day Society Oceti Sakowin in Present Day Society - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2: OSEUS2, OSEU2)
Lesson Plan: Oceti Sakowin, The Nine Tribes in South Dakota Oceti Sakowin, The Nine Tribes in South Dakota - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2: OSEUS2, OSEU2)
Lesson Plan: Oko Iyawapi, Week Count Oko Iyawapi, Week Count - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left. (Additional Resources)

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
Lesson Plan: Oral Tradition Oral Tradition - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
Lesson Plan: Origins and Ideals Origins and Ideals - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2: OSEUS2, OSEU2)
Lesson Plan: Passing on Lakota History through Writing Passing on Lakota History through Writing - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
Lesson Plan: Pebble Patterns - Observation Skills (Hunting) Lesson Plan: Pebble Patterns - Observation Skills (Hunting)

Provided by the South Dakota State Historical Society

Lesson Plan
(Lessons also found lower left - PDF)

Objectives:
• Participants will observe and recreate visual patterns.
• Participants will recognize the importance of good observation skills in hunting.
South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1)

SDSHSLesson
Lesson Plan: Quill Decorating Lesson Plan: Quill Decorating

Provided by the South Dakota State Historical Society

Lesson Plan
(Lessons also found lower left - PDF)

Objectives:
• Participants will identify natural resources used by the Plains Indians
• Participants will show how Plains Indians used natural items in decorating
• Participants will create an original art project

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1)

SDSHSLesson
Lesson Plan: Severalty Act Severalty Act - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1, OSEU1)
Lesson Plan: South Dakota Indian Reservations Today: Native Students South Dakota Indian Reservations Today: Native Students - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1, OSEU1)
Lesson Plan: South Dakota Indian Reservations Today: Non-Native Students South Dakota Indian Reservations Today: Non-Native Students - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1, OSEU1)


Lesson Plan: South Dakota Tribes, Reservations and Capitals South Dakota Tribes, Reservations and Capitals - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1, OSEU1)
Lesson Plan: Symbols of the Heart Symbols of the Heart - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2: OSEUS2, OSEU2)
Lesson Plan: The “Keeper” of the Count South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6)

Winter Count Lessons

Lesson Plan: The “Keeper” of the Count

“Click” Lesson Plan, Event Cards and Event Cards List (lower left in the table below the player)

Background: A winter count is a pictographic record of historical/memorable events for a tiospaye (community). The pictures, which were used as mnemonic devices, are arranged in chronological order. Originally, the memorable events were recorded on rock (many paintings found on cave walls, canyons and mountains throughout the Great Plains), on buffalo hide, deer hide, cow hide, and then ledger paper and muslin (cotton fabric).

Each tiospaye designated a winter count keeper. The keeper (traditionally a man) of the winter count was the historian for the community. Elders would gather and consult with the keeper to select the most important event of the year (first snow to first snow). The keeper would then draw an image on the winter count to represent the event. The images on the winter count were used as a reminder/aide to help the keeper remember the events. The keeper (oral historian) could then explain the events in detail.

Background information and Materials: Lesson Plan PDF - lower left

Procedure:
During this lesson the students will learn about the keeper of the winter count by completing the activity below. The students will compete in a game by drawing images of events.
Setup/Process
1. Divide the class into groups of 4-5 students.
2. One student from each group should go to the whiteboard/chalkboard. Depending on board size, only 2-3 students may be able to draw at once. Rotate through groups to accommodate board size.
3. The students are the “keepers” of the winter count. Select an event card, see step 7. The students selected to draw the event should look at the card. The students should draw a representation of the event selected.
4. The keepers have 1-2 minutes to draw the image.
5. At the end of the time period – the facilitator will go to each group and pick up one answer, written on a piece of paper, from each group. Do not allow students to yell the answers, because it is impossible to assess which group said the answer first.
6. All of the groups with the correct answer will be given a point.
7. There are 55 events (5 each, for years 2000-2010) included on the following document. (Event Cards – the events were randomly selected)
a. The following list can be printed and given to the groups if they need assistance. (Event Cards List)
b. Make additional event cards for your area. (Example: the winning of a tournament, the death of a local elder/hero, etc.)
8. Continue selecting cards and rotating through all of the students so everyone has a chance to be the keeper.
9. Visit http://wintercounts.si.edu/index.html to view original winter counts.

What to expect: The students should realize that the images drawn on traditional winter counts are not drawn in a hurry like in the game. Time and effort is taken to create an image that will spark the memory of the keeper because the keeper is responsible for providing an oral account of the images drawn. The game should reinforce the fact that the keeper of the winter count will incorporate their personal history, artistic talent and visual interpretation of the event into each image. This should be apparent by the variety of images drawn for the same event and how many of the students will not be able to identify the event drawn.
Lesson Plan: The Buffalo People The Buffalo People - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1, OSEU1)
Lesson Plan: The Mato Tipila Question: A Critical Examination of Sacred Places on Public Land The Mato Tipila Question: A Critical Examination of Sacred Places on Public Land - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1, OSEU1)
Lesson Plan: The Sioux Act of 1889 The Sioux Act of 1889 - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6, OSEU6)
Lesson Plan: Three Dimensional Design with Elements of Lakota Culture Three Dimensional Design with Elements of Lakota Culture - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 3: OSEUS3, OSEU3)

Lesson Plan: Traditional Lakota Foodways and Feasting Traditional Lakota Foodways and Feasting - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1, OSEU1)
Lesson Plan: Trickster Paper Sculpture Trickster Paper Sculpture - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
Lesson Plan: Tuktel Yati He / Tuktel Yati Hwo Tuktel Yati He / Tuktel Yati Hwo - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 4: OSEUS4, OSEU4)
Lesson Plan: Two World Views Two World Views - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6, OSEU6)
Lesson Plan: U.S. History Winter Count U.S. History Winter Count - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left. (Additional Resources)

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
Lesson Plan: Understanding How History and Geography Affected the Dakota Culture - How We Develop Identity Through Geographical Location and Knowledge of Family, Organization, and History Understanding How History and Geography Affected the Dakota Culture: How We Develop Identity Through Geographical Location and Knowledge of Family, Organization, and History - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
Lesson Plan: Understanding the Importance of Relationships in Lakota Culture Understanding the Importance of Relationships in Lakota Culture - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 4: OSEUS4, OSEU4)
Lesson Plan: Understanding Traditional and Contemporary Oglala Lakota Governance Understanding Traditional and Contemporary Oglala Lakota Governance - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left. (Tribal Government Video)

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6, OSEU6)
Lesson Plan: Value of Lakota Storytelling Value of Lakota Storytelling - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
Lesson Plan: Values in Lakota Society - The Role of Kinship Values in Lakota Society: The Role of Kinship - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 4: OSEUS4, OSEU4)
Lesson Plan: Vine Deloria, Jr. & Black Elk Speak - Recorded Lakota Visions as Artful Literary Expression Vine Deloria, Jr. & Black Elk Speak: Recorded Lakota Visions as Artful Literary Expression - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 3: OSEUS3, OSEU3)
Lesson Plan: Web Quest–Federal Laws Affecting Indian People Web Quest–Federal Laws Affecting Indian People - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6, OSEU6)
Lesson Plan: Winter Count Winter Count - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left. (Additional Resources)

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
Lesson Plan: Winter Count - An Introduction Winter Count: An Introduction - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left. (Additional Resources)

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
Lesson Plan: Winter Count Dyes South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6)

Winter Count Lessons

Lesson Plan: Winter Count Dyes

“Click” Lesson Plan and Chart (lower left in the table below the player)

Background: A winter count is a pictographic record of historical/memorable events for a tiospaye (community). The pictures, which were used as mnemonic devices, are arranged in chronological order. Originally, the memorable events were recorded on rock (many paintings found on cave walls, canyons and mountains throughout the Great Plains), on buffalo hide, deer hide, cow hide, and then ledger paper and muslin (cotton fabric).

The dyes used to record the images also changed over the years. Berries, clay, plants, roots, and buffalo gall (liver bile), blood and stomach contents were a few of the materials used to draw the images. During today’s investigation we will test the quality of several natural dyes/pigments by checking for clarity and deepness.

Materials:
Variety of fruits/berries (the students should be reminded that they should never eat anything during an experiment)
- Grapes (dark)
- Cherries
- Strawberries
- Mulberries
- Blueberries
- Etc.
- Glass/ceramic bowls (enough for each fruit/berry)
- Utensils (crush the fruit)
- White cotton cloth (old sheet cut into 4”X4” swatches)
- Mild liquid dishwashing detergent
- Clock with second hand or stopwatch
- Cotton swabs (Q-Tips) or brush
- Chart
- Paper towels
- Aprons/gloves (optional)

Procedure: During this activity the students will learn about natural dyes/pigments used to draw images on winter counts. The students will crush fruits and berries and then they will use the juice/dyes produced to paint cotton swatches.

Setup/Process
1. Collect the materials.
2. Crush the fruits/berries in separate bowls (remove the large pieces, leaving the juice).
3. Cut an old white sheet into 4”X4” cotton swatches.
4. Use a brush or cotton swab to paint a 1 inch diameter circle on the cloth. Each dye should have a separate cotton swatch.
5. Wait 10 minutes and then check for clarity (sharpness – defined edge) and deepness (range from dark to light).
6. Using the chart, mark clarity and deepness for each sample. Use a scale of 1-10, 10 being the sharpest and deepest.
7. Wash each sample in a mild mixture of water and dishwashing detergent. Wash each sample for 10-15 seconds. The scrubbing force, duration and action for all of the samples should be the same.
8. Place the swatches on paper towels to dry or hang dry. Let samples dry for 5-10 minutes.
9. Using the chart, mark clarity and deepness for each sample. Use a scale of 1-10, 10 being the sharpest and deepest.

What to expect: The students should realize that natural dyes work very well. Many of the fruits/berries tested will remain in the cloth for extended periods of time. The students may have experienced staining their clothing while eating fruits/berries. The students should also conclude that winter count images are durable but they can be prone to fading/breakdown over time due to environmental influences. Winter counts need to be protected to preserve clarity and deepness.

Extension: Each student could select an additional item like ketchup, mustard or chocolate syrup to test. Also, the natural dyes could be compared to compounds like permanent marker or tee-shirt paint.
Lesson Plan: Winter Counts - Waniyetu Wowapi Winter Counts - Waniyetu Wowapi: This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left. (Additional Resources)

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
Lesson Plan: Wohpe at the Y Wohpe at the Y: Ella Deloria Domesticates the Lakota Goddess-like Wohpe for Christian Children - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2012.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
Lesson: Waniyetu Wowapi (winter count) - Recording the Past and the Future South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6)

Winter Count Lessons

Lesson Plan: Winter Count - Recording the Past and the Future

“Click” Lesson Plan PDF for details and links (lower left in the table below the player)

Procedure: During this lesson the students will learn about the similarities and differences between winter counts and other methods of recording events like timelines, history books, scrapbooks, encyclopedias, journals/diaries and calendars. The students will develop a pictorial image of an upcoming event found on their family calendar. (K-5: Modify as needed for level of understanding and grade level.)

Background information and Materials: Lesson Plan PDF - lower left

Process The students will view (compare and contrast) winter counts, timelines, history books, scrapbooks, encyclopedias, journal/diaries and calendars. Then the students will bring a calendar from home and select an upcoming event. The students will select an event from the calendar and replace the text with a pictorial representation of the event.

What to expect: The students should realize that recording events on a winter count is one method of preserving history just like history books, encyclopedias, journals, timelines, etc. Important events are captured for future generations to learn about historical events. The students should also conclude that calendars are different because they are designed to record future events.
Lesson: Winter Counts (a closer look) - Power Point Presentations Lesson Plan: Winter Counts (a closer look)

“Click” Lesson Plan and PowerPoint Presentations - lower left in the table below the player (Advance through the sides slowly for the interactive to work properly) ***NOTE*** The presentations download very slowly if you choose "Open". Please select "Save", and save the PowerPoint presentations to your desktop for a quick download.

Winter Count Lessons

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6)

Background: A winter count is a pictographic record of historical/memorable events for a tiospaye (community). The pictures, which were used as mnemonic devices, are arranged in chronological order. Originally, the memorable events were recorded on rock (many paintings found on cave walls, canyons and mountains throughout the Great Plains), on buffalo hide, deer hide, cow hide, and then ledger paper and muslin (cotton fabric).

Each tiospaye designated a winter count keeper. The keeper (traditionally a man) of the winter count was the historian for the community. Elders would gather and consult with the keeper to select the most important event of the year (first snow to first snow). The keeper would then draw an image on the winter count to represent the event. The images on the winter count were used as a reminder/aide to help the keeper remember the events. The keeper (oral historian) could then explain the events in detail.

Procedure: During this lesson the students will learn about the images drawn on winter counts by completing the activity below. During the activity the students will compare their own pictorial representation of an event with the original keeper of the winter count.

Setup/Process
1. Open the first PowerPoint presentation - Winter Counts (a closer look) **NOTE** The presentation downloads very slowly if you choose "Open". Please select "Save", and save the PowerPoint presentation to your desktop for a quick download.
2. The students will view textual representations of winter count images and the “Collector’s Notes” for each image.
3. The students are the “keeper(s)” of the winter count. Have the students draw their representation of the event chosen by the elders. (Option: Have 2-4 students draw their representations on the board (rotate through all of the students))
4. PowerPoint - Advance to the original image created by the keeper.
5. Compare the keeper’s representation with the students’.
6. Continue advancing through the slides. (2 PowerPoint presentations, each with 10 images)
7. Make additional slides:
a. Visit: http://wintercounts.si.edu/index.html
b. Click: Lakota Winter Counts –Online Exhibit-
c. Click: Skip Intro
d. Click: View Winter Counts
e. Click: Overview
f. Select Image
g. Click: Collect This Winter Count
h. Click: My Winter Count
i. Enter Email Address – Images will be sent to your address
8. Visit http://wintercounts.si.edu/index.html to continue looking at original winter counts.

What to expect: The students should realize that the keeper of the winter count is also a historian for the tiospaye (community). The keeper is responsible for providing an oral account of the images drawn. The images should be drawn to help spark the memory of the keeper.

The students should also realize that the keeper experienced the event, which would make recalling the memory much easier. It would be interesting to return (after a few weeks) to some of the images drawn by the students to see if they can recall the textual representations/“Collector’s Notes” of the events.
Let’s Play As a Team! Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Let’s Play As a Team! (SD Library Search) by P.K. Hallinan, Ideals Children’s Books - Do you ever get into fights when you play games at recess… me too? Getting into fights really takes the run out of recess. Read Let’s Play As a Team! and put the fun back into recess.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Live and Remember – The Solaris Lakota Project Live and Remember – The Solaris Lakota Project

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1)
(Essential Understanding 2: OSEUS2)
(Essential Understanding 4: OSEUS4)
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5)

Topics covered in program:
- Sweat Lodge Purification Ceremony (inipi)
- Song and Dance
- Oral Tradition
- Medicine and Spirit World
- Living Today (1980s)
- Spirituality (Eagle Dance/ Hoop Dance)

Dissolution of the Sioux Nation (map):
- Treaty of 1851: Lakota Territory (Montana, Wyoming, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska)
- 1868 Fort Laramie Treaty: Great Sioux Reservation
- Agreement of 1876
- Act of 1889 Division of Sioux Reservation

Consultants/Interviews
- Stanley Red Bird
- Anne Medicine
- Mercy Poorman
- Ben Black Bear Jr.
- Ben Black Bear Sr.
- Norbert Running
- Albert White Hat
- Lloyd One Star
- Sandra Black Bear White
- Gerald Mohatt
- Victor Douville
Looking from the Inside Out - 102 That's Me Looking from the Inside Out
102. That's Me (Pride)

An effective resource that helps children handle their feelings.
15 Minutes
Looking from the Inside Out - 103 I'll Decide Looking from the Inside Out
103 - I'll Decide (Independence)

An effective resource that helps children handle their feelings.
15 Minutes
Looking from the Inside Out - 104 Sticks and Stones Looking from the Inside Out
104. Sticks and Stones (Embarrassment)

An effective resource that helps children handle their feelings.
15 Minutes
Looking from the Inside Out - 105 Oh, Yeah? Looking from the Inside Out
105. Oh, Yeah? (Anger)

An effective resource that helps children handle their feelings.
15 Minutes
Looking from the Inside Out - 106 Now What Do I Do? Looking from the Inside Out
106. Now What Do I Do? (Frustration)

An effective resource that helps children handle their feelings.
15 Minutes
Looking from the Inside Out - 107 Alone in a Crowd Looking from the Inside Out
107. Alone in a Crowd (Loneliness)

An effective resource that helps children handle their feelings.
15 Minutes
Looking from the Inside Out - 108 A Helping Hand Looking from the Inside Out
108. A Helping Hand (Caring)

An effective resource that helps children handle their feelings.
15 Minutes
Looking from the Inside Out - 109 In Harms Way Looking from the Inside Out
109. In Harms Way (Fear)

An effective resource that helps children handle their feelings.
15 Minutes

Looking from the Inside Out - 110 Learning to Say "No" Looking from the Inside Out
110. Learning to Say "No" (Being Pressured)

An effective resource that helps children handle their feelings.
15 Minutes
Looking from the Inside Out - 111 Saying Goodbye Looking from the Inside Out
111. Saying Goodbye (Grief)

An effective resource that helps children handle their feelings.
15 Minutes
Looking from the Inside Out - 112 Will He or Won't He? Looking from the Inside Out
112. Will He or Won't He? (Distrust)

An effective resource that helps children handle their feelings.
15 Minutes
Looking from the Inside Out - 113 Changes Looking from the Inside Out
113. Changes (Sadness)

An effective resource that helps children handle their feelings.
15 Minutes
Looking from the Inside Out - 114 Worrywart Looking from the Inside Out
114. Worrywart (Worry)

An effective resource that helps children handle their feelings.
15 Minutes
Looking from the Inside Out - 115 I Know I Can Looking from the Inside Out
115. I Know I Can (Determination)

An effective resource that helps children handle their feelings.
15 Minutes
Looking From the Inside Out 101 - I Don't Get It Looking from the Inside Out
101. I Don't Get It (Confusion)

An effective resource that helps children handle their feelings.
15 Minutes
Lost Bird of Wounded Knee South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6)

Lost Bird of Wounded Knee Website

In the spring or summer of 1890, Lost Bird was born somewhere on the prairies of South Dakota. Fate took her to Wounded Knee Creek on the Pine Ridge Reservation on Dec. 29, 1890.

On that tragic day, hundreds of Lakota men, women and children died in a confrontation with U.S. troops and the woman who likely was the child’s mother was among them. But as she was dying, she and her baby found some scanty shelter from the bitter cold and wind in the bank of a creek.

Four days after the massacre, a rescue party found the infant, miraculously alive, protected by the woman’s frozen body.

The infant was passed from one person to another and her sensational story attracted the attention of powerful white men. Eventually, this living souvenir of Wounded Knee ended up in the hands of a National Guard general.

Lost Bird was adopted by Gen. Leonard Colby and, without her knowledge or consent, his suffragist wife, Clara Bewick Colby. The baby’s original name died on the killing field, along with her chance to grow up in her own culture. She became. literally and figuratively, Zintkala Nuni, the Lost Bird.

So Lost Bird – Zintka, as her adopted mother called her – ended up the daughter of a very socially and historically prominent white couple. She had one big advantage – a mother who came to love her. Though Zintka’s adoption was a surprise to her, Clara Colby took on the duties of motherhood in addition to her work as a suffragette activist, lecturer, publisher and writer.

However, Zintka’s childhood was marred by her exposure to racism, possible abuse from adoptive relatives and the indifference of her father. Poverty entered into the mix when Gen. Colby abandoned his wife for the child’s nursemaid/governess and failed to provide adequate support for Clara Colby and Zintka.

The increasingly restless child endured miserable stays with relatives and at boarding schools and became harder and harder for her mother to control.

At age 17, Zintka was sent back to her father and his new wife in Beatrice, Neb. The result was disastrous. A few months later, Gen. Colby placed his now-pregnant daughter in a stark and severe reformatory. Her son was stillborn, but the girl remained in the facility for a year.

Zintka eventually returned to her mother. At one point, she seemed to have found happiness in marriage, but the relationship disintegrated when she discovered her new husband had given her syphilis, then incurable. She struggled with the effects of that illness for the rest of her life.

She had a number a careers during her short life: work with Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show, various entertainment and acting jobs, and possibly prostitution. Three times, she managed to visit South Dakota in search of her roots, but her welcome was cool.

By 1916, Zintka was living in abject poverty. She and her then-husband, who suffered from illness, were trying to make a living in vaudeville. She had had two more children. One died, probably that year, and Zintka gave the other to an Indian woman who was better able to care for him. Later that year, she lost her loving mother, Clara Colby, to pneumonia.

Eventually, Zintka and her husband gave up vaudeville and moved in with his parents in Hanford, Calif., in 1918. Zintka fell ill on Feb. 9, 1920, as an influenza epidemic swept across the nation. On Feb. 14, Valentine’s Day, she died.

Clara Colby tried to raise Zintka as a white girl in an unaccepting society and tried to erase her unceasing attraction to her Lakota culture. In the end, Zintka was rejected by both.

Lost Bird finally came home in 1991, in an effort spurred in part by author Renee Sansom Flood, author of "Lost Bird of Wounded Knee: Spirit of the Lakota." Her grave was found in California and her remains were returned to South Dakota and buried at the grave site at Wounded Knee. Her tragic story led to the organization of the Lost Bird Society, which helps Native Americans who were adopted outside their culture find their roots.

M. Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing - Stacking Realism Combined Video - Stacking (Realism Combined): In an animated segment, Artist Dick Termes looks at how the various forms can be combined in realistic pictures. He also identifies how the forms can be seen in natural and imagined objects and he draws a landscape and a fantasy creature.

Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing is a multi-part video series featuring South Dakota artist Dick Termes teaching basic drawing techniques. Resources available for the project are described in the following Teaching and User’s Guide and are available at PBS Learning Media. The series includes more than five hours of content in 20 individual videos (Preview), activities, a teacher’s guide and lesson plans that could be integrated into classrooms of all kinds or for use at home.
Mammals (Activities Only, PDF Lower Left) (Activities Only, PDF Lower Left)

Mammals - Resources for classroom and home use, including activity ideas, video, guidebooks and more.
Mathematics is Elementary 101 - Number Sense and Place Value Mathematics is Elementary
101. What's a Thousand? Number Sense and Place Value

This series uses real classrooms and real-life situations to involve students in contextual learning. Through an interactive process, teachers and children encounter every aspect of the world of mathematics. Instead of passive viewing, the videos provide stop-point opportunities to discuss everyday problems and engage in activities that draw students directly into problem solving.
15-minutes
Mathematics is Elementary 102 - Patterns and Relationships Mathematics is Elementary
102. What's Next? Patterns and Relationships

This series uses real classrooms and real-life situations to involve students in contextual learning. Through an interactive process, teachers and children encounter every aspect of the world of mathematics. Instead of passive viewing, the videos provide stop-point opportunities to discuss everyday problems and engage in activities that draw students directly into problem solving.
15-minutes
Mathematics is Elementary 103 - Operations and Computation Mathematics is Elementary
103. What Is It Worth? Operations and Computation

This series uses real classrooms and real-life situations to involve students in contextual learning. Through an interactive process, teachers and children encounter every aspect of the world of mathematics. Instead of passive viewing, the videos provide stop-point opportunities to discuss everyday problems and engage in activities that draw students directly into problem solving.
15-minutes
Mathematics is Elementary 104 - Number Sense and Fractions Mathematics is Elementary
104. Is There Action in Fractions? Number Sense and Fractions

This series uses real classrooms and real-life situations to involve students in contextual learning. Through an interactive process, teachers and children encounter every aspect of the world of mathematics. Instead of passive viewing, the videos provide stop-point opportunities to discuss everyday problems and engage in activities that draw students directly into problem solving.
15-minutes
Mathematics is Elementary 105 - Measurement Mathematics is Elementary
105. How Long? How Far? Measurement

This series uses real classrooms and real-life situations to involve students in contextual learning. Through an interactive process, teachers and children encounter every aspect of the world of mathematics. Instead of passive viewing, the videos provide stop-point opportunities to discuss everyday problems and engage in activities that draw students directly into problem solving.
15-minutes
Mathematics is Elementary 106 - Measurement (Weight) Mathematics is Elementary
106. How Much? How Many? Measurement (Weight)

This series uses real classrooms and real-life situations to involve students in contextual learning. Through an interactive process, teachers and children encounter every aspect of the world of mathematics. Instead of passive viewing, the videos provide stop-point opportunities to discuss everyday problems and engage in activities that draw students directly into problem solving.
15-minutes
Mathematics is Elementary 107 - Measurement (Volume) Mathematics is Elementary
107. How Much Does It Hold? Measurement (Volume)

This series uses real classrooms and real-life situations to involve students in contextual learning. Through an interactive process, teachers and children encounter every aspect of the world of mathematics. Instead of passive viewing, the videos provide stop-point opportunities to discuss everyday problems and engage in activities that draw students directly into problem solving.
15-minutes
Mathematics is Elementary 108 - Geometry and Spatial Sense Mathematics is Elementary
108. What Shape Is It In? Geometry and Spatial Sense

This series uses real classrooms and real-life situations to involve students in contextual learning. Through an interactive process, teachers and children encounter every aspect of the world of mathematics. Instead of passive viewing, the videos provide stop-point opportunities to discuss everyday problems and engage in activities that draw students directly into problem solving.
15-minutes
Mathematics is Elementary 109 - Geometry and Measurement Mathematics is Elementary
109. What Size Do I Need? Geometry and Measurement

This series uses real classrooms and real-life situations to involve students in contextual learning. Through an interactive process, teachers and children encounter every aspect of the world of mathematics. Instead of passive viewing, the videos provide stop-point opportunities to discuss everyday problems and engage in activities that draw students directly into problem solving.
15-minutes
Mathematics is Elementary 110 - Geometry Parts and Shapes, 3-D Mathematics is Elementary

110. What's This When It Comes Together? Geometry Parts and Shapes, 3-D

This series uses real classrooms and real-life situations to involve students in contextual learning. Through an interactive process, teachers and children encounter every aspect of the world of mathematics. Instead of passive viewing, the videos provide stop-point opportunities to discuss everyday problems and engage in activities that draw students directly into problem solving.
15-minutes
Mathematics is Elementary 111 - Collecting and Using Data Mathematics is Elementary
111. How Can I Find Out? Collecting and Using Data

This series uses real classrooms and real-life situations to involve students in contextual learning. Through an interactive process, teachers and children encounter every aspect of the world of mathematics. Instead of passive viewing, the videos provide stop-point opportunities to discuss everyday problems and engage in activities that draw students directly into problem solving.
15-minutes
Mathematics is Elementary 112 - Statistics and Probability Mathematics is Elementary
112. Is It Likely? Statistics and Probability

This series uses real classrooms and real-life situations to involve students in contextual learning. Through an interactive process, teachers and children encounter every aspect of the world of mathematics. Instead of passive viewing, the videos provide stop-point opportunities to discuss everyday problems and engage in activities that draw students directly into problem solving.
15-minutes
Mathematics is Elementary 113 - Algebra and Function Mathematics is Elementary
113. How Many Ways? Algebra and Function

This series uses real classrooms and real-life situations to involve students in contextual learning. Through an interactive process, teachers and children encounter every aspect of the world of mathematics. Instead of passive viewing, the videos provide stop-point opportunities to discuss everyday problems and engage in activities that draw students directly into problem solving.
15-minutes

Mathematics is Elementary 114 - Using Math is Elementary Mathematics is Elementary
114. Using Math is Elementary

This series uses real classrooms and real-life situations to involve students in contextual learning. Through an interactive process, teachers and children encounter every aspect of the world of mathematics. Instead of passive viewing, the videos provide stop-point opportunities to discuss everyday problems and engage in activities that draw students directly into problem solving.
15-minutes
Mathemedia 101 - Graphs Mathemedia
101. Graphs

Mathemedia helps teach students to apply mathematics principles to real-world situations, by placing math in everyday and workplace contexts. Real-life applications of mathematics concepts are illustrated through dramatic video segments showing peer-age characters using math to solve common problems. Increase understanding of mathematics utilizing context-based, problem-solving activities recommended by the NCTM. Modules can easily be integrated into your current curriculum because they are based on the NCTM standards and correlate to over 30 mathematics textbooks from 14 different educational publishers.
20 Minutes
Mathemedia 102 - Decimals and Exponents Mathemedia
102. Decimals and Exponents

Mathemedia helps teach students to apply mathematics principles to real-world situations, by placing math in everyday and workplace contexts. Real-life applications of mathematics concepts are illustrated through dramatic video segments showing peer-age characters using math to solve common problems. Increase understanding of mathematics utilizing context-based, problem-solving activities recommended by the NCTM. Modules can easily be integrated into your current curriculum because they are based on the NCTM standards and correlate to over 30 mathematics textbooks from 14 different educational publishers.
SDPB 20 Minutes
Mathemedia 103 - Logical Reasoning Mathemedia
103. Logical Reasoning

Mathemedia helps teach students to apply mathematics principles to real-world situations, by placing math in everyday and workplace contexts. Real-life applications of mathematics concepts are illustrated through dramatic video segments showing peer-age characters using math to solve common problems. Increase understanding of mathematics utilizing context-based, problem-solving activities recommended by the NCTM. Modules can easily be integrated into your current curriculum because they are based on the NCTM standards and correlate to over 30 mathematics textbooks from 14 different educational publishers.
SDPB 20 Minutes
Mathemedia 104 - Measurement Mathemedia
104. Measurement

Mathemedia helps teach students to apply mathematics principles to real-world situations, by placing math in everyday and workplace contexts. Real-life applications of mathematics concepts are illustrated through dramatic video segments showing peer-age characters using math to solve common problems. Increase understanding of mathematics utilizing context-based, problem-solving activities recommended by the NCTM. Modules can easily be integrated into your current curriculum because they are based on the NCTM standards and correlate to over 30 mathematics textbooks from 14 different educational publishers.
SDPB 20 Minutes
Mathemedia 105 - Fractions Mathemedia
105. Fractions

Mathemedia helps teach students to apply mathematics principles to real-world situations, by placing math in everyday and workplace contexts. Real-life applications of mathematics concepts are illustrated through dramatic video segments showing peer-age characters using math to solve common problems. Increase understanding of mathematics utilizing context-based, problem-solving activities recommended by the NCTM. Modules can easily be integrated into your current curriculum because they are based on the NCTM standards and correlate to over 30 mathematics textbooks from 14 different educational publishers.
SDPB 20 Minutes
Mathemedia 106 - Positive and Negative Numbers Mathemedia
106. Positive and Negative Numbers

Mathemedia helps teach students to apply mathematics principles to real-world situations, by placing math in everyday and workplace contexts. Real-life applications of mathematics concepts are illustrated through dramatic video segments showing peer-age characters using math to solve common problems. Increase understanding of mathematics utilizing context-based, problem-solving activities recommended by the NCTM. Modules can easily be integrated into your current curriculum because they are based on the NCTM standards and correlate to over 30 mathematics textbooks from 14 different educational publishers.
SDPB 20 Minutes
Mathemedia 107 - Formulas Mathemedia
107. Formulas

Mathemedia helps teach students to apply mathematics principles to real-world situations, by placing math in everyday and workplace contexts. Real-life applications of mathematics concepts are illustrated through dramatic video segments showing peer-age characters using math to solve common problems. Increase understanding of mathematics utilizing context-based, problem-solving activities recommended by the NCTM. Modules can easily be integrated into your current curriculum because they are based on the NCTM standards and correlate to over 30 mathematics textbooks from 14 different educational publishers.
SDPB 20 Minutes
Mathemedia 108 - Ratios Mathemedia
108. Ratios

Mathemedia helps teach students to apply mathematics principles to real-world situations, by placing math in everyday and workplace contexts. Real-life applications of mathematics concepts are illustrated through dramatic video segments showing peer-age characters using math to solve common problems. Increase understanding of mathematics utilizing context-based, problem-solving activities recommended by the NCTM. Modules can easily be integrated into your current curriculum because they are based on the NCTM standards and correlate to over 30 mathematics textbooks from 14 different educational publishers.
SDPB 20 Minutes
Mathemedia 109 - Percentages Mathemedia
109. Percentages

Mathemedia helps teach students to apply mathematics principles to real-world situations, by placing math in everyday and workplace contexts. Real-life applications of mathematics concepts are illustrated through dramatic video segments showing peer-age characters using math to solve common problems. Increase understanding of mathematics utilizing context-based, problem-solving activities recommended by the NCTM. Modules can easily be integrated into your current curriculum because they are based on the NCTM standards and correlate to over 30 mathematics textbooks from 14 different educational publishers.
SDPB 20 Minutes
Mathemedia 110 - Area and Volume Mathemedia
110. Area and Volume

Mathemedia helps teach students to apply mathematics principles to real-world situations, by placing math in everyday and workplace contexts. Real-life applications of mathematics concepts are illustrated through dramatic video segments showing peer-age characters using math to solve common problems. Increase understanding of mathematics utilizing context-based, problem-solving activities recommended by the NCTM. Modules can easily be integrated into your current curriculum because they are based on the NCTM standards and correlate to over 30 mathematics textbooks from 14 different educational publishers.
SDPB 20 Minutes
Mathemedia 111 - Probability Mathemedia
111. Probability

Mathemedia helps teach students to apply mathematics principles to real-world situations, by placing math in everyday and workplace contexts. Real-life applications of mathematics concepts are illustrated through dramatic video segments showing peer-age characters using math to solve common problems. Increase understanding of mathematics utilizing context-based, problem-solving activities recommended by the NCTM. Modules can easily be integrated into your current curriculum because they are based on the NCTM standards and correlate to over 30 mathematics textbooks from 14 different educational publishers.
SDPB 20 Minutes
Mathemedia 112 - Coordinates Mathemedia
112. Coordinates

Mathemedia helps teach students to apply mathematics principles to real-world situations, by placing math in everyday and workplace contexts. Real-life applications of mathematics concepts are illustrated through dramatic video segments showing peer-age characters using math to solve common problems. Increase understanding of mathematics utilizing context-based, problem-solving activities recommended by the NCTM. Modules can easily be integrated into your current curriculum because they are based on the NCTM standards and correlate to over 30 mathematics textbooks from 14 different educational publishers.
SDPB 20 Minutes
Microlife That Lives in Soil Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Microlife That Lives in Soil (SD Library Search) by Steve Parker, Raintree - Hello Kids, it is your buddy… Buddy! Do you recycle leaves and bananas into the soil? I don’t but I have tiny friends in the soil that do. Read Microlife That Lives in Soil if you want to see them.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

Mission US (Click Link in the Description) (Website: Teachers Guide, Interactive Games and More!) Mission US is a multimedia project that immerses players in U.S. history content through free interactive games.

Mission 1: “For Crown or Colony?” puts players in the shoes of Nat Wheeler, a printer’s apprentice in 1770 Boston. They encounter both Patriots and Loyalists, and when rising tensions result in the Boston Massacre, they must choose where their loyalties lie.

In Mission 2: “Flight to Freedom,” players take on the role of Lucy, a 14-year-old slave in Kentucky. As they navigate her escape and journey to Ohio, they discover that life in the “free” North is dangerous and difficult. In 1850, the Fugitive Slave Act brings disaster. Will Lucy ever truly be free?

Music: No Cover, No Minimum (Click the Link in the Description) (Website) The classic South Dakota Public Broadcasting local music series from the early 1980s - No Cover, No Minimum - is back on SDPB Television! There’s a new generation of musical talent, and some of South Dakota’s long-standing favorites. Performers are from South Dakota or performing in our state.
My First Green Book Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

My First Green Book (SD Library Search) by Angela Wilkes, Alfred A. Knopf - Buddy here… I have a challenge for you. Do you know how to clean water with sand, rocks and leaves? If you do not, then you should read My First Green Book for the answer.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
N Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing - Contour Lines Episode 1 Video - Contour Lines Episode I: Artist Dick Termes introduces the concept of contour surface lines, which run across forms to draw out the form. He stresses that the lines and strokes should go parallel to the edges of the forms and shows how that applies to the curved cylinders and spheres. He draws a large piece of fabric starting with the outline lines and adds the contour lines. Ultimately, he demonstrates how important contour surface lines are by erasing them and leaving only the outlines.

Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing is a multi-part video series featuring South Dakota artist Dick Termes teaching basic drawing techniques. Resources available for the project are described in the following Teaching and User’s Guide and are available at PBS Learning Media. The series includes more than five hours of content in 20 individual videos (Preview), activities, a teacher’s guide and lesson plans that could be integrated into classrooms of all kinds or for use at home.
Nature Adventures Module: Alligators, Crocodiles - OH MY! Access resources for your own nature adventure including birding books, field guides and more.

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Nature Adventures Related Resources (No Video) Resources for parents and teachers. Categories are found in the chart, lower left.
O. Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing - Contour Lines Episode 2 Video - Contour Lines Episode II (Drawing a Pickup Truck): The video starts with an overview of contour surface lines for different forms. In drawing a pickup truck, artist Dick Termes shows how the contour lines give the drawing its form.

Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing is a multi-part video series featuring South Dakota artist Dick Termes teaching basic drawing techniques. Resources available for the project are described in the following Teaching and User’s Guide and are available at PBS Learning Media. The series includes more than five hours of content in 20 individual videos (Preview), activities, a teacher’s guide and lesson plans that could be integrated into classrooms of all kinds or for use at home.
Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires (Chapter 1: We call Ourselves the Oyate) South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards (Introduction)

Chapter 1: We call Ourselves the Oyate - The Oyate are the native people of the upper Midwest, made up of seven tribes and three language (Lakota, Nakota, Dakota) groups. (Website)

For six-hundred years we have lived under the misconception that Columbus discovered America. What he did was stumble on a land already occupied by many people and many nations. In the center of that land were a people who call themselves Oyate: “the People”. This is their story, in their words. (Entire Program)


Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires, offers a broad overview of the Dakota, Lakota, and Nakota people in South Dakota. Its purpose is to provide a brief introduction to and history of the tribes in the state and their traditional way of life from a tribal perspective.

The Oceti Sakowin program is meant to be used in in-service situations to promote strategic thinking about how to address the specific needs of Native American students as well as curriculum-level thinking and planning about when, where, and what to teach. The purpose of the guide is to offer workshop facilitators a variety of options for using the program in teacher workshops. (Workshop Guide)

Key Concepts
The dominant Western society’s view of Native American history and culture is sometimes in conflict with Native Americans’ own sense of their story. While modern science suggests that the Oyate people migrated to the area that became South Dakota, their traditional beliefs have them originating in this area. The original native people of South Dakota know themselves as the Oyate. The Oyate are composed of three major groups: Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota. Seven tribes comprise those three major groups: Mdewakantonwan, Ihanktonwan, Ihanktonwanna, Sisitonwan, Tetonwan, Wahpetonwan, and Wahpekute. The Oyate people passed on their culture, beliefs, and traditions from generation to generation orally. Their language and stories were not recorded until the late nineteenth century. The Oyate have a rich spiritual life that is still widely practiced through several rituals and that is based in a strong sense of harmony with nature and each other. Oyate groups were organized according to consistent social and gender roles. The Oyate people organized society around extensive kinship systems called tiospaye.

(Cheyenne River, Clifford Canku, Craig Howe, Native American Indian, Jerome Kills Small, language, Ione Quigley, Albert White Hat, SR., Lakota Dancers from Wacipi, Curtis Collection, Lakota Warriors, Bear Butte, Sioux, Lakota, Dakota, Nakota, Culture, miscommunication, Europeans, dialect, Ojibwa, Cree, Nadouessi, snakes people, Nadouessioux, interpreter, misunderstandings, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, OSEUS, OSEUS1, OSEUS2, OSEUS3, OSEUS4, OSEUS5, OSEUS6, OSEUS7)
Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires (Chapter 2: The Seven Council Fires) South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards (Introduction)

Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires (Chapter 2)

The Seven Council Fires: The seven tribes routinely came together to maintain relationships. (Website)

For six-hundred years we have lived under the misconception that Columbus discovered America. What he did was stumble on a land already occupied by many people and many nations. In the center of that land were a people who call themselves Oyate: “the People”. This is their story, in their words. (Entire Program)

Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires, offers a broad overview of the Dakota, Lakota, and Nakota people in South Dakota. Its purpose is to provide a brief introduction to and history of the tribes in the state and their traditional way of life from a tribal perspective.

The Oceti Sakowin program is meant to be used in in-service situations to promote strategic thinking about how to address the specific needs of Native American students as well as curriculum-level thinking and planning about when, where, and what to teach. The purpose of the guide is to offer workshop facilitators a variety of options for using the program in teacher workshops. (Workshop Guide)

Key Concepts
The dominant Western society’s view of Native American history and culture is sometimes in conflict with Native Americans’ own sense of their story. While modern science suggests that the Oyate people migrated to the area that became South Dakota, their traditional beliefs have them originating in this area. The original native people of South Dakota know themselves as the Oyate. The Oyate are composed of three major groups: Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota. Seven tribes comprise those three major groups: Mdewakantonwan, Ihanktonwan, Ihanktonwanna, Sisitonwan, Tetonwan, Wahpetonwan, and Wahpekute. The Oyate people passed on their culture, beliefs, and traditions from generation to generation orally. Their language and stories were not recorded until the late nineteenth century. The Oyate have a rich spiritual life that is still widely practiced through several rituals and that is based in a strong sense of harmony with nature and each other. Oyate groups were organized according to consistent social and gender roles. The Oyate people organized society around extensive kinship systems called tiospaye.

Program Interviewees - In large part, this program sought to allow the Oyate people the opportunity to tell their own story. This was accomplished primarily through interviews with a number of South Dakota-based experts in the history and traditions of the people. Clifford Canku, Dakota Studies Instructor at Sisseton Wahpeton College at Sisseton Wahpeton Reservation. Russell Eagle Bear, Tribal Council, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Norris, SD. Dr. Craig Howe, Graduate Studies Instructor, Oglala Lakota College, Pine Ridge Reservation, SD. Jerome Kills Small, Instructor of American Indian Studies, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD. Kevin Locke, Native American Performer, Lakota Performing Arts, Standing Rock Lakota Reservation, Wakpala, SD. Ione Quigley, Chairperson, Lakota Studies at Sinte Gleska University, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, SD. Webster Two Hawk, Three times past Chairman of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. Albert White Hat, Sr., Professor of Lakota Language at Sinte Gleska University, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, SD.
(OSEUS, OSEUS1, OSEUS2, OSEUS3, OSEUS4, OSEUS5, OSEUS6, OSEUS7)
Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires (Chapter 3: The Origins of the People) South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1 - land base)
(Essential Understanding 3: OSEUS3 - origin, oral philosophy)
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5 - oral tradition)

Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires (Chapter 3)

The Origins of the People: The Oyate peoples’ traditional stories of their origins do not match those of Western science. (Website)

For six-hundred years we have lived under the misconception that Columbus discovered America. What he did was stumble on a land already occupied by many people and many nations. In the center of that land were a people who call themselves Oyate: “the People”. This is their story, in their words. (Entire Program)

Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires, offers a broad overview of the Dakota, Lakota, and Nakota people in South Dakota. Its purpose is to provide a brief introduction to and history of the tribes in the state and their traditional way of life from a tribal perspective.

The Oceti Sakowin program is meant to be used in in-service situations to promote strategic thinking about how to address the specific needs of Native American students as well as curriculum-level thinking and planning about when, where, and what to teach. The purpose of the guide is to offer workshop facilitators a variety of options for using the program in teacher workshops. (Workshop Guide)

Key Concepts
The dominant Western society’s view of Native American history and culture is sometimes in conflict with Native Americans’ own sense of their story. While modern science suggests that the Oyate people migrated to the area that became South Dakota, their traditional beliefs have them originating in this area. The original native people of South Dakota know themselves as the Oyate. The Oyate are composed of three major groups: Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota. Seven tribes comprise those three major groups: Mdewakantonwan, Ihanktonwan, Ihanktonwanna, Sisitonwan, Tetonwan, Wahpetonwan, and Wahpekute. The Oyate people passed on their culture, beliefs, and traditions from generation to generation orally. Their language and stories were not recorded until the late nineteenth century. The Oyate have a rich spiritual life that is still widely practiced through several rituals and that is based in a strong sense of harmony with nature and each other. Oyate groups were organized according to consistent social and gender roles. The Oyate people organized society around extensive kinship systems called tiospaye.

Program Interviewees - In large part, this program sought to allow the Oyate people the opportunity to tell their own story. This was accomplished primarily through interviews with a number of South Dakota-based experts in the history and traditions of the people. Clifford Canku, Dakota Studies Instructor at Sisseton Wahpeton College at Sisseton Wahpeton Reservation. Russell Eagle Bear, Tribal Council, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Norris, SD. Dr. Craig Howe, Graduate Studies Instructor, Oglala Lakota College, Pine Ridge Reservation, SD. Jerome Kills Small, Instructor of American Indian Studies, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD. Kevin Locke, Native American Performer, Lakota Performing Arts, Standing Rock Lakota Reservation, Wakpala, SD. Ione Quigley, Chairperson, Lakota Studies at Sinte Gleska University, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, SD. Webster Two Hawk, Three times past Chairman of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. Albert White Hat, Sr., Professor of Lakota Language at Sinte Gleska University, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, SD.
Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires (Chapter 4: Kinship Is Everything) South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 4: OSEUS4)

Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires (Chapter 4)

Kinship Is Everything: The role of family relationships in organizing Oyate life is paramount. (Website)

For six-hundred years we have lived under the misconception that Columbus discovered America. What he did was stumble on a land already occupied by many people and many nations. In the center of that land were a people who call themselves Oyate: “the People”. This is their story, in their words. (Entire Program)

Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires, offers a broad overview of the Dakota, Lakota, and Nakota people in South Dakota. Its purpose is to provide a brief introduction to and history of the tribes in the state and their traditional way of life from a tribal perspective.

The Oceti Sakowin program is meant to be used in in-service situations to promote strategic thinking about how to address the specific needs of Native American students as well as curriculum-level thinking and planning about when, where, and what to teach. The purpose of the guide is to offer workshop facilitators a variety of options for using the program in teacher workshops. (Workshop Guide)

Key Concepts
The dominant Western society’s view of Native American history and culture is sometimes in conflict with Native Americans’ own sense of their story. While modern science suggests that the Oyate people migrated to the area that became South Dakota, their traditional beliefs have them originating in this area. The original native people of South Dakota know themselves as the Oyate. The Oyate are composed of three major groups: Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota. Seven tribes comprise those three major groups: Mdewakantonwan, Ihanktonwan, Ihanktonwanna, Sisitonwan, Tetonwan, Wahpetonwan, and Wahpekute. The Oyate people passed on their culture, beliefs, and traditions from generation to generation orally. Their language and stories were not recorded until the late nineteenth century. The Oyate have a rich spiritual life that is still widely practiced through several rituals and that is based in a strong sense of harmony with nature and each other. Oyate groups were organized according to consistent social and gender roles. The Oyate people organized society around extensive kinship systems called tiospaye.

Program Interviewees - In large part, this program sought to allow the Oyate people the opportunity to tell their own story. This was accomplished primarily through interviews with a number of South Dakota-based experts in the history and traditions of the people. Clifford Canku, Dakota Studies Instructor at Sisseton Wahpeton College at Sisseton Wahpeton Reservation. Russell Eagle Bear, Tribal Council, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Norris, SD. Dr. Craig Howe, Graduate Studies Instructor, Oglala Lakota College, Pine Ridge Reservation, SD. Jerome Kills Small, Instructor of American Indian Studies, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD. Kevin Locke, Native American Performer, Lakota Performing Arts, Standing Rock Lakota Reservation, Wakpala, SD. Ione Quigley, Chairperson, Lakota Studies at Sinte Gleska University, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, SD. Webster Two Hawk, Three times past Chairman of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. Albert White Hat, Sr., Professor of Lakota Language at Sinte Gleska University, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, SD.
Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires (Chapter 5: The Sacred Hoop of Life) South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2: OSEUS2)
(Essential Understanding 4: OSEUS4)

Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires (Chapter 5)

The Sacred Hoop of Life: The Oyate's view all life as interrelated and express that symbolically through the circle. (Website)

For six-hundred years we have lived under the misconception that Columbus discovered America. What he did was stumble on a land already occupied by many people and many nations. In the center of that land were a people who call themselves Oyate: “the People”. This is their story, in their words. (Entire Program)

Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires, offers a broad overview of the Dakota, Lakota, and Nakota people in South Dakota. Its purpose is to provide a brief introduction to and history of the tribes in the state and their traditional way of life from a tribal perspective.

The Oceti Sakowin program is meant to be used in in-service situations to promote strategic thinking about how to address the specific needs of Native American students as well as curriculum-level thinking and planning about when, where, and what to teach. The purpose of the guide is to offer workshop facilitators a variety of options for using the program in teacher workshops. (Workshop Guide)

Key Concepts
The dominant Western society’s view of Native American history and culture is sometimes in conflict with Native Americans’ own sense of their story. While modern science suggests that the Oyate people migrated to the area that became South Dakota, their traditional beliefs have them originating in this area. The original native people of South Dakota know themselves as the Oyate. The Oyate are composed of three major groups: Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota. Seven tribes comprise those three major groups: Mdewakantonwan, Ihanktonwan, Ihanktonwanna, Sisitonwan, Tetonwan, Wahpetonwan, and Wahpekute. The Oyate people passed on their culture, beliefs, and traditions from generation to generation orally. Their language and stories were not recorded until the late nineteenth century. The Oyate have a rich spiritual life that is still widely practiced through several rituals and that is based in a strong sense of harmony with nature and each other. Oyate groups were organized according to consistent social and gender roles. The Oyate people organized society around extensive kinship systems called tiospaye.

Program Interviewees - In large part, this program sought to allow the Oyate people the opportunity to tell their own story. This was accomplished primarily through interviews with a number of South Dakota-based experts in the history and traditions of the people. Clifford Canku, Dakota Studies Instructor at Sisseton Wahpeton College at Sisseton Wahpeton Reservation. Russell Eagle Bear, Tribal Council, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Norris, SD. Dr. Craig Howe, Graduate Studies Instructor, Oglala Lakota College, Pine Ridge Reservation, SD. Jerome Kills Small, Instructor of American Indian Studies, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD. Kevin Locke, Native American Performer, Lakota Performing Arts, Standing Rock Lakota Reservation, Wakpala, SD. Ione Quigley, Chairperson, Lakota Studies at Sinte Gleska University, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, SD. Webster Two Hawk, Three times past Chairman of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. Albert White Hat, Sr., Professor of Lakota Language at Sinte Gleska University, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, SD.
Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires (Chapter 6: The Lakota Way-The Dakota Way) South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1)

Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires (Chapter 6)

The Lakota Way-The Dakota Way: The Oyate people lived in quite different geographical areas and climate, which caused them to live differently. (Website)

For six-hundred years we have lived under the misconception that Columbus discovered America. What he did was stumble on a land already occupied by many people and many nations. In the center of that land were a people who call themselves Oyate: “the People”. This is their story, in their words. (Entire Program)

Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires, offers a broad overview of the Dakota, Lakota, and Nakota people in South Dakota. Its purpose is to provide a brief introduction to and history of the tribes in the state and their traditional way of life from a tribal perspective.

The Oceti Sakowin program is meant to be used in in-service situations to promote strategic thinking about how to address the specific needs of Native American students as well as curriculum-level thinking and planning about when, where, and what to teach. The purpose of the guide is to offer workshop facilitators a variety of options for using the program in teacher workshops. (Workshop Guide)

Key Concepts
The dominant Western society’s view of Native American history and culture is sometimes in conflict with Native Americans’ own sense of their story. While modern science suggests that the Oyate people migrated to the area that became South Dakota, their traditional beliefs have them originating in this area. The original native people of South Dakota know themselves as the Oyate. The Oyate are composed of three major groups: Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota. Seven tribes comprise those three major groups: Mdewakantonwan, Ihanktonwan, Ihanktonwanna, Sisitonwan, Tetonwan, Wahpetonwan, and Wahpekute. The Oyate people passed on their culture, beliefs, and traditions from generation to generation orally. Their language and stories were not recorded until the late nineteenth century. The Oyate have a rich spiritual life that is still widely practiced through several rituals and that is based in a strong sense of harmony with nature and each other. Oyate groups were organized according to consistent social and gender roles. The Oyate people organized society around extensive kinship systems called tiospaye.

Program Interviewees - In large part, this program sought to allow the Oyate people the opportunity to tell their own story. This was accomplished primarily through interviews with a number of South Dakota-based experts in the history and traditions of the people. Clifford Canku, Dakota Studies Instructor at Sisseton Wahpeton College at Sisseton Wahpeton Reservation. Russell Eagle Bear, Tribal Council, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Norris, SD. Dr. Craig Howe, Graduate Studies Instructor, Oglala Lakota College, Pine Ridge Reservation, SD. Jerome Kills Small, Instructor of American Indian Studies, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD. Kevin Locke, Native American Performer, Lakota Performing Arts, Standing Rock Lakota Reservation, Wakpala, SD. Ione Quigley, Chairperson, Lakota Studies at Sinte Gleska University, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, SD. Webster Two Hawk, Three times past Chairman of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. Albert White Hat, Sr., Professor of Lakota Language at Sinte Gleska University, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, SD.
Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires (Chapter 7: The Dance of Life) South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5)

Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires (Chapter 7)

The Dance of Life: For the Oyate, music and the arts are very connected to how they experience the world; even their musical instruments have symbolic meaning. (Website)

For six-hundred years we have lived under the misconception that Columbus discovered America. What he did was stumble on a land already occupied by many people and many nations. In the center of that land were a people who call themselves Oyate: “the People”. This is their story, in their words. (Entire Program)

Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires, offers a broad overview of the Dakota, Lakota, and Nakota people in South Dakota. Its purpose is to provide a brief introduction to and history of the tribes in the state and their traditional way of life from a tribal perspective.

The Oceti Sakowin program is meant to be used in in-service situations to promote strategic thinking about how to address the specific needs of Native American students as well as curriculum-level thinking and planning about when, where, and what to teach. The purpose of the guide is to offer workshop facilitators a variety of options for using the program in teacher workshops. (Workshop Guide)

Key Concepts
The dominant Western society’s view of Native American history and culture is sometimes in conflict with Native Americans’ own sense of their story. While modern science suggests that the Oyate people migrated to the area that became South Dakota, their traditional beliefs have them originating in this area. The original native people of South Dakota know themselves as the Oyate. The Oyate are composed of three major groups: Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota. Seven tribes comprise those three major groups: Mdewakantonwan, Ihanktonwan, Ihanktonwanna, Sisitonwan, Tetonwan, Wahpetonwan, and Wahpekute. The Oyate people passed on their culture, beliefs, and traditions from generation to generation orally. Their language and stories were not recorded until the late nineteenth century. The Oyate have a rich spiritual life that is still widely practiced through several rituals and that is based in a strong sense of harmony with nature and each other. Oyate groups were organized according to consistent social and gender roles. The Oyate people organized society around extensive kinship systems called tiospaye.

Program Interviewees - In large part, this program sought to allow the Oyate people the opportunity to tell their own story. This was accomplished primarily through interviews with a number of South Dakota-based experts in the history and traditions of the people. Clifford Canku, Dakota Studies Instructor at Sisseton Wahpeton College at Sisseton Wahpeton Reservation. Russell Eagle Bear, Tribal Council, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Norris, SD. Dr. Craig Howe, Graduate Studies Instructor, Oglala Lakota College, Pine Ridge Reservation, SD. Jerome Kills Small, Instructor of American Indian Studies, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD. Kevin Locke, Native American Performer, Lakota Performing Arts, Standing Rock Lakota Reservation, Wakpala, SD. Ione Quigley, Chairperson, Lakota Studies at Sinte Gleska University, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, SD. Webster Two Hawk, Three times past Chairman of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. Albert White Hat, Sr., Professor of Lakota Language at Sinte Gleska University, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, SD.
Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires (Chapter 8: The Oral Tradition of the Oyate) South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5)

Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires (Chapter 8)

The Oral Tradition of the Oyate: Much of Oyate culture has been passed down orally through the generations, including songs, prayers, and storytelling. (Website)

For six-hundred years we have lived under the misconception that Columbus discovered America. What he did was stumble on a land already occupied by many people and many nations. In the center of that land were a people who call themselves Oyate: “the People”. This is their story, in their words. (Entire Program)

Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires, offers a broad overview of the Dakota, Lakota, and Nakota people in South Dakota. Its purpose is to provide a brief introduction to and history of the tribes in the state and their traditional way of life from a tribal perspective.

The Oceti Sakowin program is meant to be used in in-service situations to promote strategic thinking about how to address the specific needs of Native American students as well as curriculum-level thinking and planning about when, where, and what to teach. The purpose of the guide is to offer workshop facilitators a variety of options for using the program in teacher workshops. (Workshop Guide)

Key Concepts
The dominant Western society’s view of Native American history and culture is sometimes in conflict with Native Americans’ own sense of their story. While modern science suggests that the Oyate people migrated to the area that became South Dakota, their traditional beliefs have them originating in this area. The original native people of South Dakota know themselves as the Oyate. The Oyate are composed of three major groups: Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota. Seven tribes comprise those three major groups: Mdewakantonwan, Ihanktonwan, Ihanktonwanna, Sisitonwan, Tetonwan, Wahpetonwan, and Wahpekute. The Oyate people passed on their culture, beliefs, and traditions from generation to generation orally. Their language and stories were not recorded until the late nineteenth century. The Oyate have a rich spiritual life that is still widely practiced through several rituals and that is based in a strong sense of harmony with nature and each other. Oyate groups were organized according to consistent social and gender roles. The Oyate people organized society around extensive kinship systems called tiospaye.

Program Interviewees - In large part, this program sought to allow the Oyate people the opportunity to tell their own story. This was accomplished primarily through interviews with a number of South Dakota-based experts in the history and traditions of the people. Clifford Canku, Dakota Studies Instructor at Sisseton Wahpeton College at Sisseton Wahpeton Reservation. Russell Eagle Bear, Tribal Council, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Norris, SD. Dr. Craig Howe, Graduate Studies Instructor, Oglala Lakota College, Pine Ridge Reservation, SD. Jerome Kills Small, Instructor of American Indian Studies, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD. Kevin Locke, Native American Performer, Lakota Performing Arts, Standing Rock Lakota Reservation, Wakpala, SD. Ione Quigley, Chairperson, Lakota Studies at Sinte Gleska University, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, SD. Webster Two Hawk, Three times past Chairman of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. Albert White Hat, Sr., Professor of Lakota Language at Sinte Gleska University, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, SD.
Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires (Chapter 9: The Seven Rituals) South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2: OSEUS2)
(Essential Understanding 4: OSEUS4)

Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires (Chapter 9)

The Seven Rituals: A very spiritual people, the Oyate practiced many rituals, all of which derive from the receipt of the pipe. (Website)

For six-hundred years we have lived under the misconception that Columbus discovered America. What he did was stumble on a land already occupied by many people and many nations. In the center of that land were a people who call themselves Oyate: “the People”. This is their story, in their words. (Entire Program)

Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires, offers a broad overview of the Dakota, Lakota, and Nakota people in South Dakota. Its purpose is to provide a brief introduction to and history of the tribes in the state and their traditional way of life from a tribal perspective.

The Oceti Sakowin program is meant to be used in in-service situations to promote strategic thinking about how to address the specific needs of Native American students as well as curriculum-level thinking and planning about when, where, and what to teach. The purpose of the guide is to offer workshop facilitators a variety of options for using the program in teacher workshops. (Workshop Guide)

Key Concepts
The dominant Western society’s view of Native American history and culture is sometimes in conflict with Native Americans’ own sense of their story. While modern science suggests that the Oyate people migrated to the area that became South Dakota, their traditional beliefs have them originating in this area. The original native people of South Dakota know themselves as the Oyate. The Oyate are composed of three major groups: Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota. Seven tribes comprise those three major groups: Mdewakantonwan, Ihanktonwan, Ihanktonwanna, Sisitonwan, Tetonwan, Wahpetonwan, and Wahpekute. The Oyate people passed on their culture, beliefs, and traditions from generation to generation orally. Their language and stories were not recorded until the late nineteenth century. The Oyate have a rich spiritual life that is still widely practiced through several rituals and that is based in a strong sense of harmony with nature and each other. Oyate groups were organized according to consistent social and gender roles. The Oyate people organized society around extensive kinship systems called tiospaye.

Program Interviewees - In large part, this program sought to allow the Oyate people the opportunity to tell their own story. This was accomplished primarily through interviews with a number of South Dakota-based experts in the history and traditions of the people. Clifford Canku, Dakota Studies Instructor at Sisseton Wahpeton College at Sisseton Wahpeton Reservation. Russell Eagle Bear, Tribal Council, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Norris, SD. Dr. Craig Howe, Graduate Studies Instructor, Oglala Lakota College, Pine Ridge Reservation, SD. Jerome Kills Small, Instructor of American Indian Studies, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD. Kevin Locke, Native American Performer, Lakota Performing Arts, Standing Rock Lakota Reservation, Wakpala, SD. Ione Quigley, Chairperson, Lakota Studies at Sinte Gleska University, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, SD. Webster Two Hawk, Three times past Chairman of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. Albert White Hat, Sr., Professor of Lakota Language at Sinte Gleska University, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, SD.
Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires (Chapter Number 10: Tiospaye) South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2: OSEUS2)
(Essential Understanding 4: OSEUS4)

Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires (Chapter 10)

Tiospaye: The extended family—the tiospaye—is central in Oyate society. (Website)

For six-hundred years we have lived under the misconception that Columbus discovered America. What he did was stumble on a land already occupied by many people and many nations. In the center of that land were a people who call themselves Oyate: “the People”. This is their story, in their words. (Entire Program)

Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires, offers a broad overview of the Dakota, Lakota, and Nakota people in South Dakota. Its purpose is to provide a brief introduction to and history of the tribes in the state and their traditional way of life from a tribal perspective.

The Oceti Sakowin program is meant to be used in in-service situations to promote strategic thinking about how to address the specific needs of Native American students as well as curriculum-level thinking and planning about when, where, and what to teach. The purpose of the guide is to offer workshop facilitators a variety of options for using the program in teacher workshops. (Workshop Guide)

Key Concepts
The dominant Western society’s view of Native American history and culture is sometimes in conflict with Native Americans’ own sense of their story. While modern science suggests that the Oyate people migrated to the area that became South Dakota, their traditional beliefs have them originating in this area. The original native people of South Dakota know themselves as the Oyate. The Oyate are composed of three major groups: Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota. Seven tribes comprise those three major groups: Mdewakantonwan, Ihanktonwan, Ihanktonwanna, Sisitonwan, Tetonwan, Wahpetonwan, and Wahpekute. The Oyate people passed on their culture, beliefs, and traditions from generation to generation orally. Their language and stories were not recorded until the late nineteenth century. The Oyate have a rich spiritual life that is still widely practiced through several rituals and that is based in a strong sense of harmony with nature and each other. Oyate groups were organized according to consistent social and gender roles. The Oyate people organized society around extensive kinship systems called tiospaye.

Program Interviewees - In large part, this program sought to allow the Oyate people the opportunity to tell their own story. This was accomplished primarily through interviews with a number of South Dakota-based experts in the history and traditions of the people. Clifford Canku, Dakota Studies Instructor at Sisseton Wahpeton College at Sisseton Wahpeton Reservation. Russell Eagle Bear, Tribal Council, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Norris, SD. Dr. Craig Howe, Graduate Studies Instructor, Oglala Lakota College, Pine Ridge Reservation, SD. Jerome Kills Small, Instructor of American Indian Studies, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD. Kevin Locke, Native American Performer, Lakota Performing Arts, Standing Rock Lakota Reservation, Wakpala, SD. Ione Quigley, Chairperson, Lakota Studies at Sinte Gleska University, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, SD. Webster Two Hawk, Three times past Chairman of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. Albert White Hat, Sr., Professor of Lakota Language at Sinte Gleska University, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, SD.
Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires (Chapter Number 11: The Change) South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6)

Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires (Chapter 11)

The Change: Since their encounter with White settlers, the Oyate people and their cultural practices have undergone significant changes. (Website)

For six-hundred years we have lived under the misconception that Columbus discovered America. What he did was stumble on a land already occupied by many people and many nations. In the center of that land were a people who call themselves Oyate: “the People”. This is their story, in their words. (Entire Program)

Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires, offers a broad overview of the Dakota, Lakota, and Nakota people in South Dakota. Its purpose is to provide a brief introduction to and history of the tribes in the state and their traditional way of life from a tribal perspective.

The Oceti Sakowin program is meant to be used in in-service situations to promote strategic thinking about how to address the specific needs of Native American students as well as curriculum-level thinking and planning about when, where, and what to teach. The purpose of the guide is to offer workshop facilitators a variety of options for using the program in teacher workshops. (Workshop Guide)

Key Concepts
The dominant Western society’s view of Native American history and culture is sometimes in conflict with Native Americans’ own sense of their story. While modern science suggests that the Oyate people migrated to the area that became South Dakota, their traditional beliefs have them originating in this area. The original native people of South Dakota know themselves as the Oyate. The Oyate are composed of three major groups: Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota. Seven tribes comprise those three major groups: Mdewakantonwan, Ihanktonwan, Ihanktonwanna, Sisitonwan, Tetonwan, Wahpetonwan, and Wahpekute. The Oyate people passed on their culture, beliefs, and traditions from generation to generation orally. Their language and stories were not recorded until the late nineteenth century. The Oyate have a rich spiritual life that is still widely practiced through several rituals and that is based in a strong sense of harmony with nature and each other. Oyate groups were organized according to consistent social and gender roles. The Oyate people organized society around extensive kinship systems called tiospaye.

Program Interviewees - In large part, this program sought to allow the Oyate people the opportunity to tell their own story. This was accomplished primarily through interviews with a number of South Dakota-based experts in the history and traditions of the people. Clifford Canku, Dakota Studies Instructor at Sisseton Wahpeton College at Sisseton Wahpeton Reservation. Russell Eagle Bear, Tribal Council, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Norris, SD. Dr. Craig Howe, Graduate Studies Instructor, Oglala Lakota College, Pine Ridge Reservation, SD. Jerome Kills Small, Instructor of American Indian Studies, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD. Kevin Locke, Native American Performer, Lakota Performing Arts, Standing Rock Lakota Reservation, Wakpala, SD. Ione Quigley, Chairperson, Lakota Studies at Sinte Gleska University, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, SD. Webster Two Hawk, Three times past Chairman of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. Albert White Hat, Sr., Professor of Lakota Language at Sinte Gleska University, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, SD.
Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires (Chapter Number 12: The Way Forward) South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7)

Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires (Chapter 12)

The Way Forward: The Oyate people continue to practice their cultural and spiritual ways in order to maintain their relationships with each other and nature. (Website)

For six-hundred years we have lived under the misconception that Columbus discovered America. What he did was stumble on a land already occupied by many people and many nations. In the center of that land were a people who call themselves Oyate: “the People”. This is their story, in their words. (Entire Program)

Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires, offers a broad overview of the Dakota, Lakota, and Nakota people in South Dakota. Its purpose is to provide a brief introduction to and history of the tribes in the state and their traditional way of life from a tribal perspective.

The Oceti Sakowin program is meant to be used in in-service situations to promote strategic thinking about how to address the specific needs of Native American students as well as curriculum-level thinking and planning about when, where, and what to teach. The purpose of the guide is to offer workshop facilitators a variety of options for using the program in teacher workshops. (Workshop Guide)

Key Concepts
The dominant Western society’s view of Native American history and culture is sometimes in conflict with Native Americans’ own sense of their story. While modern science suggests that the Oyate people migrated to the area that became South Dakota, their traditional beliefs have them originating in this area. The original native people of South Dakota know themselves as the Oyate. The Oyate are composed of three major groups: Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota. Seven tribes comprise those three major groups: Mdewakantonwan, Ihanktonwan, Ihanktonwanna, Sisitonwan, Tetonwan, Wahpetonwan, and Wahpekute. The Oyate people passed on their culture, beliefs, and traditions from generation to generation orally. Their language and stories were not recorded until the late nineteenth century. The Oyate have a rich spiritual life that is still widely practiced through several rituals and that is based in a strong sense of harmony with nature and each other. Oyate groups were organized according to consistent social and gender roles. The Oyate people organized society around extensive kinship systems called tiospaye.

Program Interviewees - In large part, this program sought to allow the Oyate people the opportunity to tell their own story. This was accomplished primarily through interviews with a number of South Dakota-based experts in the history and traditions of the people. Clifford Canku, Dakota Studies Instructor at Sisseton Wahpeton College at Sisseton Wahpeton Reservation. Russell Eagle Bear, Tribal Council, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Norris, SD. Dr. Craig Howe, Graduate Studies Instructor, Oglala Lakota College, Pine Ridge Reservation, SD. Jerome Kills Small, Instructor of American Indian Studies, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD. Kevin Locke, Native American Performer, Lakota Performing Arts, Standing Rock Lakota Reservation, Wakpala, SD. Ione Quigley, Chairperson, Lakota Studies at Sinte Gleska University, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, SD. Webster Two Hawk, Three times past Chairman of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. Albert White Hat, Sr., Professor of Lakota Language at Sinte Gleska University, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, SD.
Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires (Entire Program) South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1)
(Essential Understanding 2: OSEUS2)
(Essential Understanding 3: OSEUS3)
(Essential Understanding 4: OSEUS4)
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5)
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6)
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7)

For six-hundred years we have lived under the misconception that Columbus discovered America. What he did was stumble on a land already occupied by many people and many nations. In the center of that land were a people who call themselves Oyate: “the People”. This is their story, in their words. Original music composed and performed by Lakota artist, Kevin Locke. (Website)

Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires, offers a broad overview of the Dakota, Lakota, and Nakota people in South Dakota. Its purpose is to provide a brief introduction to and history of the tribes in the state and their traditional way of life from a tribal perspective.

Program Synopsis
1. We Call Ourselves the Oyate: The Oyate are the native people of the upper Midwest, made up of seven tribes and three language groups.
2. The Seven Council Fires: The seven tribes routinely came together to maintain relationships.
3. The Origins of the People: The Oyate peoples’ traditional stories of their origins do not match those of Western science.
4. Kinship Is Everything: The role of family relationships in organizing Oyate life is paramount.
5. The Sacred Hoop of Life: The Oyate's view all life as interrelated and express that symbolically through the circle.
6. The Lakota Way-The Dakota Way: The Oyate people lived in quite different geographical areas and climate, which caused them to live differently.
7. The Dance of Life: For the Oyate, music and the arts are very connected to how they experience the world; even their musical instruments have symbolic meaning.
8. The Oral Tradition of the Oyate: Much of Oyate culture has been passed down orally through the generations, including songs, prayers, and storytelling.
9. The Seven Rituals: A very spiritual people, the Oyate practiced many rituals, all of which derive from the receipt of the pipe.
10. Tiospaye: The extended family—the tiospaye—is central in Oyate society.
11. The Change: Since their encounter with White settlers, the Oyate people and their cultural practices have undergone significant changes.
12. The Way Forward: The Oyate people continue to practice their cultural and spiritual ways in order to maintain their relationships with each other and nature.

The Oceti Sakowin program is meant to be used in in-service situations to promote strategic thinking about how to address the specific needs of Native American students as well as curriculum-level thinking and planning about when, where, and what to teach. The purpose of the guide is to offer workshop facilitators a variety of options for using the program in teacher workshops. (Workshop Guide)

Key Concepts
The dominant Western society’s view of Native American history and culture is sometimes in conflict with Native Americans’ own sense of their story. While modern science suggests that the Oyate people migrated to the area that became South Dakota, their traditional beliefs have them originating in this area. The original native people of South Dakota know themselves as the Oyate. The Oyate are composed of three major groups: Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota. Seven tribes comprise those three major groups: Mdewakantonwan, Ihanktonwan, Ihanktonwanna, Sisitonwan, Tetonwan, Wahpetonwan, and Wahpekute. The Oyate people passed on their culture, beliefs, and traditions from generation to generation orally. Their language and stories were not recorded until the late nineteenth century. The Oyate have a rich spiritual life that is still widely practiced through several rituals and that is based in a strong sense of harmony with nature and each other. Oyate groups were organized according to consistent social and gender roles. The Oyate people organized society around extensive kinship systems called tiospaye.

Program Interviewees - In large part, this program sought to allow the Oyate people the opportunity to tell their own story. This was accomplished primarily through interviews with a number of South Dakota-based experts in the history and traditions of the people. Clifford Canku, Dakota Studies Instructor at Sisseton Wahpeton College at Sisseton Wahpeton Reservation. Russell Eagle Bear, Tribal Council, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Norris, SD. Dr. Craig Howe, Graduate Studies Instructor, Oglala Lakota College, Pine Ridge Reservation, SD. Jerome Kills Small, Instructor of American Indian Studies, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD. Kevin Locke, Native American Performer, Lakota Performing Arts, Standing Rock Lakota Reservation, Wakpala, SD. Ione Quigley, Chairperson, Lakota Studies at Sinte Gleska University, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, SD. Webster Two Hawk, Three times past Chairman of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. Albert White Hat, Sr., Professor of Lakota Language at Sinte Gleska University, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, SD.
Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires (Introduction) South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards (Introduction)

Video clip includes the prologue and chapters 1&2.

Chapter 1: We call Ourselves the Oyate - The Oyate are the native people of the upper Midwest, made up of seven tribes and three language (Lakota, Nakota, Dakota) groups.

Chapter 2 - The Seven Council Fires: The seven tribes routinely came together to maintain relationships. (Website)

For six-hundred years we have lived under the misconception that Columbus discovered America. What he did was stumble on a land already occupied by many people and many nations. In the center of that land were a people who call themselves Oyate: “the People”. This is their story, in their words. (Entire Program)

Oceti Sakowin: The People of the Seven Council Fires, offers a broad overview of the Dakota, Lakota, and Nakota people in South Dakota. Its purpose is to provide a brief introduction to and history of the tribes in the state and their traditional way of life from a tribal perspective.

The Oceti Sakowin program is meant to be used in in-service situations to promote strategic thinking about how to address the specific needs of Native American students as well as curriculum-level thinking and planning about when, where, and what to teach. The purpose of the guide is to offer workshop facilitators a variety of options for using the program in teacher workshops. (Workshop Guide)

Key Concepts
The dominant Western society’s view of Native American history and culture is sometimes in conflict with Native Americans’ own sense of their story. While modern science suggests that the Oyate people migrated to the area that became South Dakota, their traditional beliefs have them originating in this area. The original native people of South Dakota know themselves as the Oyate. The Oyate are composed of three major groups: Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota. Seven tribes comprise those three major groups: Mdewakantonwan, Ihanktonwan, Ihanktonwanna, Sisitonwan, Tetonwan, Wahpetonwan, and Wahpekute. The Oyate people passed on their culture, beliefs, and traditions from generation to generation orally. Their language and stories were not recorded until the late nineteenth century. The Oyate have a rich spiritual life that is still widely practiced through several rituals and that is based in a strong sense of harmony with nature and each other. Oyate groups were organized according to consistent social and gender roles. The Oyate people organized society around extensive kinship systems called tiospaye.

(Cheyenne River, Clifford Canku, Craig Howe, Native American Indian, Jerome Kills Small, language, Ione Quigley, Albert White Hat, SR., Lakota Dancers from Wacipi, Curtis Collection, Lakota Warriors, Bear Butte, Sioux, Lakota, Dakota, Nakota, Culture, miscommunication, Europeans, dialect, Ojibwa, Cree, Nadouessi, snakes people, Nadouessioux, interpreter, misunderstandings, Rosebud Sioux Tribe, OSEUS, OSEUS1, OSEUS2, OSEUS3, OSEUS4, OSEUS5, OSEUS6, OSEUS7)
Old School Handouts Handouts
Our Human Body 101 - What Is Blood? Our Human Body
101. What Is Blood?
Challenges student thinking, explains complex scientific structures and processes, and build an understanding of basic life and biological science topics. In-motion video footage of scientific processes, vivid computer graphics, and an easily referenced print resource reveal unique perspectives on topics studied in most middle and high school textbooks.
15 Minutes
Our Human Body 102 - The Brain Our Human Body
Challenges student thinking, explains complex scientific structures and processes, and build an understanding of basic life and biological science topics. In-motion video footage of scientific processes, vivid computer graphics, and an easily referenced print resource reveal unique perspectives on topics studied in most middle and high school textbooks.
15 Minutes
Our Human Body 103 - What Are Cells Like? Our Human Body
103. What Are Cells Like?

Challenges student thinking, explains complex scientific structures and processes, and build an understanding of basic life and biological science topics. In-motion video footage of scientific processes, vivid computer graphics, and an easily referenced print resource reveal unique perspectives on topics studied in most middle and high school textbooks.
15 Minutes
Our Human Body 104 - DNA: Life's Controller Our Human Body
104. DNA: Life's Controller

Challenges student thinking, explains complex scientific structures and processes, and build an understanding of basic life and biological science topics. In-motion video footage of scientific processes, vivid computer graphics, and an easily referenced print resource reveal unique perspectives on topics studied in most middle and high school textbooks.
15 Minutes
Our Human Body 105 - How Is a Human Being Formed? Our Human Body
105. How Is a Human Being Formed?

Challenges student thinking, explains complex scientific structures and processes, and build an understanding of basic life and biological science topics. In-motion video footage of scientific processes, vivid computer graphics, and an easily referenced print resource reveal unique perspectives on topics studied in most middle and high school textbooks.
15 Minutes
Our Human Body 106 - How Did Life Begin? Our Human Body
106. How Did Life Begin?

Challenges student thinking, explains complex scientific structures and processes, and build an understanding of basic life and biological science topics. In-motion video footage of scientific processes, vivid computer graphics, and an easily referenced print resource reveal unique perspectives on topics studied in most middle and high school textbooks.
15 Minutes
Our Human Body 107 - Nutrition Our Human Body
107. Nutrition

Challenges student thinking, explains complex scientific structures and processes, and build an understanding of basic life and biological science topics. In-motion video footage of scientific processes, vivid computer graphics, and an easily referenced print resource reveal unique perspectives on topics studied in most middle and high school textbooks.
15 Minutes
Our Human Body 108 - Respiration Our Human Body
108. Respiration

Challenges student thinking, explains complex scientific structures and processes, and build an understanding of basic life and biological science topics. In-motion video footage of scientific processes, vivid computer graphics, and an easily referenced print resource reveal unique perspectives on topics studied in most middle and high school textbooks.
15 Minutes
Our Human Body 109 - The Sense of Sight Our Human Body
109. The Sense of Sight

Challenges student thinking, explains complex scientific structures and processes, and build an understanding of basic life and biological science topics. In-motion video footage of scientific processes, vivid computer graphics, and an easily referenced print resource reveal unique perspectives on topics studied in most middle and high school textbooks.
15 Minutes
Our Human Body 110 - Viruses Our Human Body
110. Viruses

Challenges student thinking, explains complex scientific structures and processes, and build an understanding of basic life and biological science topics. In-motion video footage of scientific processes, vivid computer graphics, and an easily referenced print resource reveal unique perspectives on topics studied in most middle and high school textbooks.
15 Minutes
P. Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing - Shading Video - Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing - Shading: After a brief video introduces shading for each of the basic forms, in an extended session, artist Dick Termes demonstrates shading to define details using a previously drawn landscape scene (Landscape Scene PDF: (8.5x11) or (8.5x14)). (In the Shading Extra video, Dick completes the landscape shading started in the first video.)

Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing is a multi-part video series featuring South Dakota artist Dick Termes teaching basic drawing techniques. Resources available for the project are described in the following Teaching and User’s Guide and are available at PBS Learning Media. The series includes more than five hours of content in 20 individual videos (Preview), activities, a teacher’s guide and lesson plans that could be integrated into classrooms of all kinds or for use at home.
PBS LearningMedia Tutorial Learn how to Search PBS LearningMedia by Subject Area (PBS LearningMedia Website)


Pearl Harbor Survivors: South Dakota Stories Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

Pearl Harbor Survivors: South Dakota Stories (Watch President Roosevelt’s Speech, Background Information & More): Once there were more than 50 members left in the South Dakota Pearl Harbor Survivors Association. In May, 2000, when SDPB interviewed them for this documentary, there were just 19. Each was there on the historic "day which will live in infamy." Dec. 7, 1941 when a Japanese surprise attack on Oahu left thousands dead and injured and catapulted the United States into World War II. SDPB Television has recorded the breathtaking stories of nine of these men for posterity in Pearl Harbor Survivors: South Dakota Stories. The special includes the exploits of men like David Smith of Colman, who crawled up the deck of his ship as the torpedoed vessel rolled over, then slid down the side into the water. And Darrel Christopherson of Vermillion who recalls the bombing of his ship, which the crew beached on mud flats to prevent its sinking. The hour-long documentary also explores their backgrounds, their military experiences and their feelings during the chaos of the Oahu attacks.
Perch Dissection: Part I (Exterior) Perch Dissection Video (Part 1 of 2) - This video details the external anatomy of a frog. Additional videos, lesson plans, quizzes, additional dissections, and more available at SDPB.org. (Part II - Interior)
Perch Dissection: Part II (Interior) Perch Dissection Video (Part 1 of 2) - This video details the external anatomy of a frog. Additional videos, lesson plans, quizzes, additional dissections, and more available at SDPB.org. (Part I - Exterior)
Physical Science : Soda Pop Density Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(Lesson Plans) A simple density activity/lesson that demonstrates items with the same volume can have different densities. (Density is the amount of stuff (matter) in an object. Density = mass/volume (d = m/v))
Physical Science Demo : Tablecloth vs Inertia (1st Law of Motion) Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(Lesson Plans) This is an awesome activity/lesson that demonstrates inertia (1st Law of Motion) and/or impulse. The classic and magical "pull the tablecloth from under the food demo."

Physical Science Demo: Liquid Flax (Density) Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(Bonus Video/ Lesson Plans) A simple density activity/lesson that demonstrates items can sink or float in materials other than water. (Density is the amount of stuff (matter) in an object. Density = mass/volume (d = m/v))
Physical Science Demo: Liquid Flax Bonus Video (Density) Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(Liquid Flax Video/ Lesson Plans) A simple density activity/lesson that demonstrates items can sink or float in materials other than water. (Density is the amount of stuff (matter) in an object. Density = mass/volume (d = m/v))
Physics: What Matters, What Moves 101 - What is Electricity? Physics: What Matters, What Moves
101. What is Electricity?
Presents an overview of naturally occurring electricity found in nature and the role of matter and atoms in electrical charges. Shows how charged atomic particles come to provide electricity and how electric currents are created, transported, and used.

Physics traditionally has been a difficult subject to master, but this series makes its complexities not only understandable and enjoyable for students but also relevant to their own lives. They illuminate physical processes and show students how these relate to their future careers, stimulate independent and group study, and promote further research.
15 Minutes
Physics: What Matters, What Moves 102 - The Sun Physics: What Matters, What Moves
102. The Sun
Reveals how everything that exists is a form of energy. Discusses sources of kinetic, chemical, and nuclear energy and the conversion and transport of energy produced from these sources. Provides an overview of the use of nonrenewable sources (such as fossil fuels) and renewable sources (such as the sun).

Physics traditionally has been a difficult subject to master, but this series makes its complexities not only understandable and enjoyable for students but also relevant to their own lives. They illuminate physical processes and show students how these relate to their future careers, stimulate independent and group study, and promote further research.
15 Minutes
Physics: What Matters, What Moves 103 - Gravity Physics: What Matters, What Moves
103. Gravity
Describes the role of gravity in simple, everyday mechanical operations, as well as in providing balance to our universe. Explores the interaction of gravity with other forces and shows how various forces cause motion.

Physics traditionally has been a difficult subject to master, but this series makes its complexities not only understandable and enjoyable for students but also relevant to their own lives. They illuminate physical processes and show students how these relate to their future careers, stimulate independent and group study, and promote further research. 15 Minutes
Physics: What Matters, What Moves 104 - What is Light? Physics: What Matters, What Moves
104. What is Light? Explains that light is only one of many forms of electromagnetic radiation. Demonstrates how white light imbues objects with shape and color, making them visible. Analyzes various sources of light and how light moves from them.

Physics traditionally has been a difficult subject to master, but this series makes its complexities not only understandable and enjoyable for students but also relevant to their own lives. They illuminate physical processes and show students how these relate to their future careers, stimulate independent and group study, and promote further research.
15 Minutes

Physics: What Matters, What Moves 105 - Motion Physics: What Matters, What Moves
105. Motion
Describes what movement means and how everything, no matter how stationary in appearance, is actually moving. Illustrates and explores varieties of trajectory, as well as velocity. Examines the influence of mass and gravity on motion.

Physics traditionally has been a difficult subject to master, but this series makes its complexities not only understandable and enjoyable for students but also relevant to their own lives. They illuminate physical processes and show students how these relate to their future careers, stimulate independent and group study, and promote further research.
15 Minutes
Physics: What Matters, What Moves 106 - Nuclear Forces Physics: What Matters, What Moves
106. Nuclear Forces
Begins with an overview of the relationship between matter, elements, and atoms, as well as the structure of the atom. Explores fission and fusion processes and explains how these provide the energy for life on Earth.

Physics traditionally has been a difficult subject to master, but this series makes its complexities not only understandable and enjoyable for students but also relevant to their own lives. They illuminate physical processes and show students how these relate to their future careers, stimulate independent and group study, and promote further research.
15 Minutes
Pick Up the Park Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Pick Up the Park (SD Library Search) by Charles Ghigna, Picture Window Books - Hey Kids! Buddy Here? Do you like to make Trash-into-Treasure Bottles? Not sure what a Trash-into-Treasure Bottles is… then read the book Pick Up the Park and make a treasure bottle for you room!

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Piece of Heaven - A Brief History of the Mickelson Trail Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

"Piece of Heaven" tells the story of the development of South Dakota's Mickelson Trail. Now one of the state's most popular outdoor attractions, the Trail might never have been built. ( South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks: Mickelson Trail)

Related Video:
- Part 1: Dedication events during the 1998 dedication of South Dakota's George S. Mickelson Trail.
- Part 2: Dedication events during the 1998 dedication of South Dakota's George S. Mickelson Trail.
- Part 3: Dedication events during the 1998 dedication of South Dakota's George S. Mickelson Trail.
- Part 3: Dedication events during the 1998 dedication of South Dakota's George S. Mickelson Trail.
- The 16th Annual Mickelson Trail Trek.
- 1991 Burlington Northern Heritage Trail Dedication.
- Deadwood Marathon

(Rail to Trail Act, best public use, legal battle, landowner, Black Hills Rail to Trails Association, State Supreme Court, easement, petition, horseback, equine, transpiration, recreation, sports, SD Game, Fish and Parks, marathon, R.R., Railroad, right of way, abandonment process, Burlington Northern, Deadwood, Edgemont, Lead, highland, transportation, trussle, bridge, bike, bicycle, annexation, south dakota history)
Plants (Activities Only, PDF Lower Left) (Activities Only, PDF Lower Left)

Plants - Resources for classroom and home use, including activity ideas, video, guidebooks and more.
Play Like a Girl: A History of Girls Basketball in South Dakota A one-hour SDBP documentary tracking the evolution of girls basketball in the state. Memorable coaches and players help tell the intriguing tale of one of our state's most beloved games. (High Resolution Video)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Poetry Out Loud (No Video - Click Website in Description) (Website, Including Curriculum Materials for Teachers) Poetry Out Loud is a nationwide poetry competition for high school students initiated and supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Foundation. South Dakota Arts Council, South Dakotans for the Arts and South Dakota Public Broadcasting are statewide sponsors of the event.

Poetry Out Loud 2015 POL Recording Form
Political Aspects of Lakota Culture: An Approach to Curriculum Development. Lesson Plan – Political Aspects of Lakota Culture: An Approach to Curriculum Development. - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1 : OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(Essential Understanding 5 : OSEUS5, OSEU5)
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6, OSEU6)
OSEUS, OSEU
Q. Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing - Shading Extra Dick completes the landscape shading started in the first video.

Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing is a multi-part video series featuring South Dakota artist Dick Termes teaching basic drawing techniques. Resources available for the project are described in the following Teaching and User’s Guide and are available at PBS Learning Media. The series includes more than five hours of content in 20 individual videos (Preview), activities, a teacher’s guide and lesson plans that could be integrated into classrooms of all kinds or for use at home.
R. Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing - Landscapes Video - Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing - Landscapes: Dick draws an imagined but realistic landscape using the basic forms seen in the videos in the series. He applied contour surface lines and shading.

Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing is a multi-part video series featuring South Dakota artist Dick Termes teaching basic drawing techniques. Resources available for the project are described in the following Teaching and User’s Guide and are available at PBS Learning Media. The series includes more than five hours of content in 20 individual videos (Preview), activities, a teacher’s guide and lesson plans that could be integrated into classrooms of all kinds or for use at home.
REGIONAL YOUTH TOWN HALL MEETING: DUST BOWL REGIONAL YOUTH TOWN HALL MEETING: DUST BOWL

Topics of Discussion: Floods and Droughts in South Dakota.

Museum of South Dakota State Historical Society Regional Youth Town Hall - Two area experts served as speakers, with the discussion moderated by historian Dr. Brad Tennant from Presentation College in Aberdeen. Speakers included State Climatologist Dr. Dennis Todey and Eric Stasch, operations project manager for the Oahe Project with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Pierre. Stasch and Todey answered questions about the flood and the drought. (More/Museum)

NATIONAL YOUTH SUMMIT: DUST BOWL On October 17, 2012, the National Museum of American History (NMAH) partnered with the National Endowment for the Humanities, PBS and Smithsonian Affiliations to present the National Youth Summit on the Dust Bowl. The program connected thousands of high school students and united them in a national dialogue regarding the Dust Bowl’s legacy on both the environment and the culture of the United States.

Watch SDPB's Dust Bowl Dakota Life Online SDPB Television’s magazine-style program looked at three aspects of the Dirty ‘30s. Dust Bowl Remembered – Some South Dakotans old enough to recall the hard times of the 1930s share their stories. Dust Bowl National Youth Summit - Kids gather in Pierre for a question-and-answer webinar presented by the Smithsonian Institute. Dust Bowl Lessons Learned – The drought of the 1930s changed farming forever. The federal government established the Soil Conservation Service at the peak of the 1930s drought. The agency has changed its name to the National Resources Conservation Service, but the mission of protecting natural resources – agricultural resources in particular – remains the same.

THE DUST BOWL: A Film By Ken Burns (Teacher) A new two-part, four-hour documentary by Ken Burns, takes us to the southern plains of our country and terrifying disaster. The film chronicles the environmental catastrophe that, throughout the 1930s, destroyed the farmlands of the Great Plains, turned prairies into deserts and unleashed a pattern of massive, deadly dust storms that for many seemed to herald the end of the world. It was the worst manmade ecological disaster in American history.
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S. Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing - Cube Landscapes Extra Cube Landscape Extra

Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing is a multi-part video series featuring South Dakota artist Dick Termes teaching basic drawing techniques. Resources available for the project are described in the following Teaching and User’s Guide and are available at PBS Learning Media. The series includes more than five hours of content in 20 individual videos (Preview), activities, a teacher’s guide and lesson plans that could be integrated into classrooms of all kinds or for use at home.
Science Café: The Wild, Wild Weather of the Black Hills Science Café: The Wild, Wild Weather of the Black Hills Website

Susan Sanders of the National Weather Service talked about weather phenomenon in the Black Hills region. Much of her talk centered on the devastating October blizzard of 2013.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
Science for You 101 - Plant Adaptations Science for You
101. Plant Adaptations: Why Needles, Why Leaves?

Encourages students to answer their own questions about scientific and natural phenomena through hands-on experiments. Models the scientific method of questioning, hypothesizing, experimenting, observing, and inferring. Featuring dozens of easy to replicate experiments and activities, the investigative emphasis of the instruction allows both science specialists and others to effectively introduce students to the wonders of science.
SDPB 15-minutes
Science for You 102 - Animal Adaptations Science for You
102. Animal Adaptations: Why Do Zebras Have Stripes?

Encourages students to answer their own questions about scientific and natural phenomena through hands-on experiments. Models the scientific method of questioning, hypothesizing, experimenting, observing, and inferring. Featuring dozens of easy to replicate experiments and activities, the investigative emphasis of the instruction allows both science specialists and others to effectively introduce students to the wonders of science.
SDPB 15-minutes
Science for You 103 - Habitats Science for You
Science for You 103. Habitats
Encourages students to answer their own questions about scientific and natural phenomena through hands-on experiments. Models the scientific method of questioning, hypothesizing, experimenting, observing, and inferring. Featuring dozens of easy to replicate experiments and activities, the investigative emphasis of the instruction allows both science specialists and others to effectively introduce students to the wonders of science.
SDPB 15-minutes
Science for You 104 - Rocks: When Is a Rock a Liquid? Science for You
104. Rocks: When Is a Rock a Liquid?

Encourages students to answer their own questions about scientific and natural phenomena through hands-on experiments. Models the scientific method of questioning, hypothesizing, experimenting, observing, and inferring. Featuring dozens of easy to replicate experiments and activities, the investigative emphasis of the instruction allows both science specialists and others to effectively introduce students to the wonders of science.
SDPB 15-minutes
Science for You 105 - Oceans Science for You
105. Oceans: Why Is the Sea Salty?

Encourages students to answer their own questions about scientific and natural phenomena through hands-on experiments. Models the scientific method of questioning, hypothesizing, experimenting, observing, and inferring. Featuring dozens of easy to replicate experiments and activities, the investigative emphasis of the instruction allows both science specialists and others to effectively introduce students to the wonders of science.
SDPB 15-minutes
Science for You 106 - Air Pressure : How Heavy Is Air?

Encourages students to answer their own questions about scientific and natural phenomena through hands-on experiments. Models the scientific method of questioning, hypothesizing, experimenting, observing, and inferring. Featuring dozens of easy to replicate experiments and activities, the investigative emphasis of the instruction allows both science specialists and others to effectively introduce students to the wonders of science.
SDPB 15-minutes
Science for You 107 - Weather Science for You
107. Weather: How Do Clouds Float?

Encourages students to answer their own questions about scientific and natural phenomena through hands-on experiments. Models the scientific method of questioning, hypothesizing, experimenting, observing, and inferring. Featuring dozens of easy to replicate experiments and activities, the investigative emphasis of the instruction allows both science specialists and others to effectively introduce students to the wonders of science.
SDPB 15-minutes
Science for You 108 - Planet Earth Science for You
108. Planet Earth: Why Does It Get Dark?

Encourages students to answer their own questions about scientific and natural phenomena through hands-on experiments. Models the scientific method of questioning, hypothesizing, experimenting, observing, and inferring. Featuring dozens of easy to replicate experiments and activities, the investigative emphasis of the instruction allows both science specialists and others to effectively introduce students to the wonders of science.
SDPB 15-minutes
Science for You 109 - Energy Changes Science for You
109. Energy Changes: What is Energy?

Encourages students to answer their own questions about scientific and natural phenomena through hands-on experiments. Models the scientific method of questioning, hypothesizing, experimenting, observing, and inferring. Featuring dozens of easy to replicate experiments and activities, the investigative emphasis of the instruction allows both science specialists and others to effectively introduce students to the wonders of science.
SDPB 15-minutes
Science for You 110 - Light and Color Science for You
110. Light and Color: What Color Is an Apple at Night?

Encourages students to answer their own questions about scientific and natural phenomena through hands-on experiments. Models the scientific method of questioning, hypothesizing, experimenting, observing, and inferring. Featuring dozens of easy to replicate experiments and activities, the investigative emphasis of the instruction allows both science specialists and others to effectively introduce students to the wonders of science.
SDPB 15-minutes
Science for You 111 - Sound Science for You
111. Sound: What's an Echo?

Encourages students to answer their own questions about scientific and natural phenomena through hands-on experiments. Models the scientific method of questioning, hypothesizing, experimenting, observing, and inferring. Featuring dozens of easy to replicate experiments and activities, the investigative emphasis of the instruction allows both science specialists and others to effectively introduce students to the wonders of science.
SDPB 15-minutes
Science for You 112 - Magnetism Science for You
112. Magnetism: Why Does a compass Point North?

Encourages students to answer their own questions about scientific and natural phenomena through hands-on experiments. Models the scientific method of questioning, hypothesizing, experimenting, observing, and inferring. Featuring dozens of easy to replicate experiments and activities, the investigative emphasis of the instruction allows both science specialists and others to effectively introduce students to the wonders of science.
SDPB 15-minutes
Science for You 113 - Electricity Science for You
113. Electricity: Where Does Electricity Come From

Encourages students to answer their own questions about scientific and natural phenomena through hands-on experiments. Models the scientific method of questioning, hypothesizing, experimenting, observing, and inferring. Featuring dozens of easy to replicate experiments and activities, the investigative emphasis of the instruction allows both science specialists and others to effectively introduce students to the wonders of science.
SDPB 15-minutes
Science for You 114 - Bubbles Science for You
114. Bubbles: How Do Insects Walk on Water?

Encourages students to answer their own questions about scientific and natural phenomena through hands-on experiments. Models the scientific method of questioning, hypothesizing, experimenting, observing, and inferring. Featuring dozens of easy to replicate experiments and activities, the investigative emphasis of the instruction allows both science specialists and others to effectively introduce students to the wonders of science.
SDPB 15-minutes
Science for You 115 - Scientific Method Science for You
115. Scientific Method: Who Needs Science?

Encourages students to answer their own questions about scientific and natural phenomena through hands-on experiments. Models the scientific method of questioning, hypothesizing, experimenting, observing, and inferring. Featuring dozens of easy to replicate experiments and activities, the investigative emphasis of the instruction allows both science specialists and others to effectively introduce students to the wonders of science.
SDPB 15-minutes
Science is Elementary 101 - Let's Explore Science is Elementary
101. Let's Explore Plants How do air, light, and water help plants grow?

Channel children's natural curiosity into hands-on explorations of science. Investigate how science affects students everyday, and apply scientific concepts across curriculum areas. Engage students in observation and thinking with open-ended questions, visual examples, a three-step learning cycle, and You Try It! challenges.
SDPB 15-minutes
Science is Elementary 102 - Let's Explore Animals Science is Elementary
102. Let's Explore Animals
Why do animals have camouflage and other specialized body parts?

Channel children's natural curiosity into hands-on explorations of science. Investigate how science affects students everyday, and apply scientific concepts across curriculum areas. Engage students in observation and thinking with open-ended questions, visual examples, a three-step learning cycle, and You Try It! challenges.
SDPB 15-minutes
Science is Elementary 103 - Let's Explore Water Science is Elementary
103. Let's Explore Water
How does water freeze and melt?

Channel children's natural curiosity into hands-on explorations of science. Investigate how science affects students everyday, and apply scientific concepts across curriculum areas. Engage students in observation and thinking with open-ended questions, visual examples, a three-step learning cycle, and You Try It! challenges.
SDPB 15-minutes
Science is Elementary 104 - Let's Explore Light and Shadows Science is Elementary
104. Let's Explore Light and Shadows
How do shadows move and change size?

Channel children's natural curiosity into hands-on explorations of science. Investigate how science affects students everyday, and apply scientific concepts across curriculum areas. Engage students in observation and thinking with open-ended questions, visual examples, a three-step learning cycle, and You Try It! challenges.
SDPB 15-minutes
Science is Elementary 105 - Let's Explore Sound Science is Elementary
105. Let's Explore Sound 
How do sounds travel through water, air and solids?

Channel children's natural curiosity into hands-on explorations of science. Investigate how science affects students everyday, and apply scientific concepts across curriculum areas. Engage students in observation and thinking with open-ended questions, visual examples, a three-step learning cycle, and You Try It! challenges.
SDPB 15-minutes
Science is Elementary 106 - Let's Explore Tools and Work Science is Elementary
106. Let's Explore Tools and Work
When is a seesaw a tool?

Channel children's natural curiosity into hands-on explorations of science. Investigate how science affects students everyday, and apply scientific concepts across curriculum areas. Engage students in observation and thinking with open-ended questions, visual examples, a three-step learning cycle, and You Try It! challenges.
SDPB 15-minutes
Science is Elementary 107 - Let's Explore Magnets Science is Elementary
107. Let's Explore Magnets
How do like and opposite magnetic poles attract each other?

Channel children's natural curiosity into hands-on explorations of science. Investigate how science affects students everyday, and apply scientific concepts across curriculum areas. Engage students in observation and thinking with open-ended questions, visual examples, a three-step learning cycle, and You Try It! challenges.
SDPB 15-minutes
Science is Elementary 108 - Let's Explore Air Science is Elementary
108. Let's Explore Air
What is inside and empty jar?

Channel children's natural curiosity into hands-on explorations of science. Investigate how science affects students everyday, and apply scientific concepts across curriculum areas. Engage students in observation and thinking with open-ended questions, visual examples, a three-step learning cycle, and You Try It! challenges.
SDPB 15-minutes
Science is Elementary 109 - Let's Explore Weather and the Seasons Science is Elementary 109.
Let's Explore Weather and the Seasons
How do buildings protect us from seasonal weather?

Channel children's natural curiosity into hands-on explorations of science. Investigate how science affects students everyday, and apply scientific concepts across curriculum areas. Engage students in observation and thinking with open-ended questions, visual examples, a three-step learning cycle, and You Try It! challenges. SDPB 15-minutes
Science is Elementary 110 - Let's Explore Soil and Rocks Science is Elementary
110. Let's Explore Soil and Rocks
What are rock, soil, and sand made of?

Channel children's natural curiosity into hands-on explorations of science. Investigate how science affects students everyday, and apply scientific concepts across curriculum areas. Engage students in observation and thinking with open-ended questions, visual examples, a three-step learning cycle, and You Try It! challenges.
SDPB 15-minutes
SD Heroes Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

SD Heroes (Facts, Background Information & More): South Dakota played an active role in World War II, from the armed services to housing POWs to raising crops to training soldiers. In one way or another, everyone in the state was affected. More than 10 percent of South Dakota's population. An estimated 68,000 men and women enlisted in the armed services. Some 2,000 gave their lives. SDPB Radio looks at the state's role in this global conflict with a one-hour documentary, DAKOTA HEROES. The program earned a prestigious national Edward R. Murrow Award for documentary in 2002, one of the top journalism awards in the country.

The program covers a variety of fascinating topics, including:

-How the war changed South Dakota forever.
-What the state was like before Pearl Harbor.
-The role of women on the homefront and on the front lines.
-The bombing of Tokyo in 1942.
-The Army radio school in Sioux Falls, the air base in Rapid City and other training sites.
-Scrap drives, rationing and victory gardens.
-The attacks on the American prairies.
-Those who opposed the war.
-Lakota Code Talkers.
-The homefront as remembered in photography.
-George McGovern's involvement in the European air war.
-South Dakota's connection to the first atom bomb.
-First person stories and more.
SD Symphony Young People's Concert: Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet (Teachers Guide/ Photos)
A unique combination: an excellent orchestra performing pieces from one of the world's greatest ballets by one of the world's great composers based on one of the world's most beloved plays by perhaps the world's greatest playwright.
SDPB KIDS Schedule October 2013 (PDF - Lower Left) SDPB KIDS Schedule October 2013 (PDF - Lower Left)
SDPB KIDS Schedule October 2013 (PDF - Lower Left) SDPB KIDS Schedule October 2013 (PDF - Lower Left)
Sea Star (starfish) Dissection Sea star dissection lesson plan and interactive PowerPoint presentation (lower left).
Sea Star Dissection: Student Cut #1 for Lesson Plan Student Cut #1 - Sea star dissection for educational use: additional video, lesson plans, quizzes, additional dissections and more available at SDPB.org. The video details the external anatomy of a sea star.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(Echinoderm, echinoderms, spiny skin, radial symmetry, dermal internal skeleton, phylum, invertebrate, dissection, saltwater, best dissection, lab activity, SDPB, DSU, EDU, college, high school, middle school, university, edu, biology, zoology, cool dissection, starfish dissection, sea star dissection, seastar dissection, pyloric cecum, cardiac stomach, pyloric stomach, digestive glands, madreporite plate, ring canal, stone canal, radial canal, ampulla, tube feet, tubefeet, clam, gonads, PBS, Dakota State University South Dakota Public Broadcasting)
Sea Star Dissection: Student Cut #2 for Lesson Plan Student Cut #2 - Sea star dissection for educational use: additional video, lesson plans, quizzes, additional dissections and more available at SDPB.org. The video details the external anatomy of a sea star.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(Echinoderm, echinoderms, spiny skin, radial symmetry, dermal internal skeleton, phylum, invertebrate, dissection, saltwater, best dissection, lab activity, SDPB, DSU, EDU, college, high school, middle school, university, edu, biology, zoology, cool dissection, starfish dissection, sea star dissection, seastar dissection, pyloric cecum, cardiac stomach, pyloric stomach, digestive glands, madreporite plate, ring canal, stone canal, radial canal, ampulla, tube feet, tubefeet, clam, gonads, PBS, Dakota State University South Dakota Public Broadcasting)
Sea Star Dissection: Student Cut #3 for Lesson Plan Student Cut #3 - Sea star dissection for educational use: additional video, lesson plans, quizzes, additional dissections and more available at SDPB.org. The video details the external anatomy of a sea star.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

(Echinoderm, echinoderms, spiny skin, radial symmetry, dermal internal skeleton, phylum, invertebrate, dissection, saltwater, best dissection, lab activity, SDPB, DSU, EDU, college, high school, middle school, university, edu, biology, zoology, cool dissection, starfish dissection, sea star dissection, seastar dissection, pyloric cecum, cardiac stomach, pyloric stomach, digestive glands, madreporite plate, ring canal, stone canal, radial canal, ampulla, tube feet, tubefeet, clam, gonads, PBS, Dakota State University South Dakota Public Broadcasting)
Selection of the Winter Count Keeper (audio only) South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6)

Audio Only - Victor Douville, Sinte Gleska University, explains how the Keeper of the winter count was selected.

Winter Count Lessons

Related lesson plans and PowerPoint presentations, lower left.
Shadow of Meth Resources - Lower Left

A one-hour documentary on the meth epidemic in the prairie region told firsthand by those hardest hit. More Info

Methamphetamine affects more than just the person ravaged by their addiction. The story of the meth epidemic in the prairie region will be told firsthand through those hardest hit: the members of families torn apart by this insidious drug, the criminal justice system scrambling to contain a drug supply that seemingly has no end, the medical and counseling professions struggling to find treatment that works, and the first hand stories of those addicts ­recovering and not­ who are living their life one day at a time in the shadow of meth.

There's trouble in SD and it has a name: methamphetamine. Meth has some other names too: crank, crystal, ice, poor man's cocaine, glass tweak, zip and speed. This addictive, powerful, and destructive drug has a solid foothold in our home state. What can we do? Knowledge of the problem is the first step.

The Shadow of Meth program was produced by a consortium of public television and radio stations in some of the states hardest hit by the meth epidemic: North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Iowa, Wisconsin, Minnesota and Kansas City.
Sioux Falls in the 50s Sioux Falls in the 50s

50’s Influences and fads from local music to television to drive-ins, featuring Sioux Falls citizens who remember the era.

South Dakota Heroes Click here for resources about South Dakota Heroes

Local Heroes - Includes personal stories about the depression era and WWII to the 211th Engineering Company's recent tour in Afghanistan.

Active Duty: An online collection of news reports, an online diary and video from the 211th Engineering Company's recent tour in Afghanistan.

American Ace - The Joe Foss Story: American Ace is the story of Joe Foss, a World War II ace, Medal of Honor winner and governor.

Dakota Heroes: SDPB Radio looks at the state's role in this global conflict with a one-hour documentary, DAKOTA HEROES. The program earned a prestigious national Edward R. Murrow Award for documentary in 2002, one of the top journalism awards in the country.

Dakota Pathways - Home Front: This episode looks at how our citizens participated in the war efforts of our nation "on the home front."

HOMEFRONT - South Dakota Stories: HOMEFRONT and WAR stories that were shared with us; we are honored to share them with you.

Korean War Memorial and Survivor Stories: South Dakota Public Broadcasting’s coverage of the parade and dedication can be viewed online.

Pearl Harbor Survivors - SD Stories: South Dakota Public Broadcasting recorded the breathtaking stories of nine survivors.

Vietnam War Memorial Dedication: South Dakota Public Broadcasting’s coverage of the parade, dedication and the Love It or Leave It: Music of the Vietnam Era special can be viewed online.

WWII Memorial Dedication: South Dakota Public Broadcasting’s coverage of the parade and dedication can be viewed online.


South Dakota State Capitol (Chapter 1) South Dakota State Capitol (Chapter 1)

The Beginning: Dakota Territory - Briefly explains the origin and leadership of Dakota Territory and the location of the territorial capital city. For more resources, photo galleries, guides, etc.

Our Statehouse: A Capitol Idea - Produced in conjunction with the centenary of the South Dakota State Capitol, Our Statehouse: A Capitol Idea is an hour long documentary, a learning tool, an entertaining program, and an important record of South Dakota’s history. Our state Capitol is rich in architectural beauty, history, and political intrigue. Our Statehouse: A Capitol Idea tells the story of the Capitol in a visually stimulating and educational format. The program provides educators and citizens with a new tool for understanding the history of our state. It presents the stories of the key players behind the creation of the Capitol, the controversy in deciding a location, the reason Pierre was finally chosen as the Capital City, and details about construction. The program includes new footage and interviews, archival video, historic photographs and documents, and aerial footage. This teaching guide plus online elements support classroom use of the program. The companion Web site includes interactive online elements, downloadable educational resources, additional interviews and footage, and photographs not included in the one-hour program. (Architecture, state government, history, restore, 1910 Dakota Territory, Yankton, President Buchanan’s, President Lincoln, William Jayne. H, Governor Ordway, Bismarck North Dakota, Capitol on Wheels, Enabling Act of 1889, statehood proclamation, constitutional convention)

South Dakota State Capitol (Chapter 2) Battle Over Location: Describes the federal legislation that allowed the creation of the state of South Dakota and the elections to decide the location of the state capital. For more resources, photo galleries, guides, etc.

Our Statehouse: A Capitol Idea - Produced in conjunction with the centenary of the South Dakota State Capitol, Our Statehouse: A Capitol Idea is an hour long documentary, a learning tool, an entertaining program, and an important record of South Dakota’s history. Our state Capitol is rich in architectural beauty, history, and political intrigue. Our Statehouse: A Capitol Idea tells the story of the Capitol in a visually stimulating and educational format. The program provides educators and citizens with a new tool for understanding the history of our state. It presents the stories of the key players behind the creation of the Capitol, the controversy in deciding a location, the reason Pierre was finally chosen as the Capital City, and details about construction. The program includes new footage and interviews, archival video, historic photographs and documents, and aerial footage. This teaching guide plus online elements support classroom use of the program. The companion Web site includes interactive online elements, downloadable educational resources, additional interviews and footage, and photographs not included in the one-hour program. (Pierre, election, legislature, Congregational Church, Old Hughes County Courthouse, R.F. Pettigrew, G. C. Moody, senators, 1890, House of Representatives, Senate, Governor Mellette, Huron, campaign)
South Dakota State Capitol (Chapter 3) Permanent Pierre: Reports on the campaign Pierre pursued to finally secure election as the State Capital. For more resources, photo galleries, guides, etc.

Our Statehouse: A Capitol Idea - Produced in conjunction with the centenary of the South Dakota State Capitol, Our Statehouse: A Capitol Idea is an hour long documentary, a learning tool, an entertaining program, and an important record of South Dakota’s history. Our state Capitol is rich in architectural beauty, history, and political intrigue. Our Statehouse: A Capitol Idea tells the story of the Capitol in a visually stimulating and educational format. The program provides educators and citizens with a new tool for understanding the history of our state. It presents the stories of the key players behind the creation of the Capitol, the controversy in deciding a location, the reason Pierre was finally chosen as the Capital City, and details about construction. The program includes new footage and interviews, archival video, historic photographs and documents, and aerial footage. This teaching guide plus online elements support classroom use of the program. The companion Web site includes interactive online elements, downloadable educational resources, additional interviews and footage, and photographs not included in the one-hour program. (1903, 1905, legislature, Mitchell, senate joint resolution, Pierre, votes, election, Governor Charels Nelson Herreid, statehouse, fireproof, archives, congressional donations, Governor Samuel H. Elrod, architect, Montana State Capitol, C.E. Bell, M.S. Detweiler, state stone, materials, native stone, field boulders, rotunda, contractor, O.H. Olsen)
South Dakota State Capitol (Chapter 4) Design and Construction Begins: Describes the process for deciding to build the State Capitol, hiring an architect and contractors, and constructing the building. For more resources, photo galleries, guides, etc.

Our Statehouse: A Capitol Idea - Produced in conjunction with the centenary of the South Dakota State Capitol, Our Statehouse: A Capitol Idea is an hour long documentary, a learning tool, an entertaining program, and an important record of South Dakota’s history. Our state Capitol is rich in architectural beauty, history, and political intrigue. Our Statehouse: A Capitol Idea tells the story of the Capitol in a visually stimulating and educational format. The program provides educators and citizens with a new tool for understanding the history of our state. It presents the stories of the key players behind the creation of the Capitol, the controversy in deciding a location, the reason Pierre was finally chosen as the Capital City, and details about construction. The program includes new footage and interviews, archival video, historic photographs and documents, and aerial footage. This teaching guide plus online elements support classroom use of the program. The companion Web site includes interactive online elements, downloadable educational resources, additional interviews and footage, and photographs not included in the one-hour program. (Sandstone, limestone, Vermont marble, fieldstone from Highmore SD, rotunda, foundation June 25th, 1908, corner stone, Governor Coe I. Crawford, Fanebust and Sons, May 1910, June 1910 capitol lake, natural gas, dome, materials, statehood, contractor, O.H. Olsen, architectural history, neoclassic, murals, artists, Edward Simmons, Great Seal, art stained glass, pendentives, agriculture, goddess, Cerces, livestock, Europa, Zeus, wisdom, industry, mining, Minerva, motherhood, lunette, Edwin Blashfield, Sprit of the West, controversy, manifest destiny)
South Dakota State Capitol (Chapter 5) Historical Moments: Tells about the construction of the Capitol annex, and Pierre residents and others talk about memories of Pierre and the workings of government; among others, the daughter of Gov. George T. Mickelson talks about her father and the birth of her brother, Gov. George S. Mickelson. For more resources, photo galleries, guides, etc.

Our Statehouse: A Capitol Idea - Produced in conjunction with the centenary of the South Dakota State Capitol, Our Statehouse: A Capitol Idea is an hour long documentary, a learning tool, an entertaining program, and an important record of South Dakota’s history. Our state Capitol is rich in architectural beauty, history, and political intrigue. Our Statehouse: A Capitol Idea tells the story of the Capitol in a visually stimulating and educational format. The program provides educators and citizens with a new tool for understanding the history of our state. It presents the stories of the key players behind the creation of the Capitol, the controversy in deciding a location, the reason Pierre was finally chosen as the Capital City, and details about construction. The program includes new footage and interviews, archival video, historic photographs and documents, and aerial footage. This teaching guide plus online elements support classroom use of the program. The companion Web site includes interactive online elements, downloadable educational resources, additional interviews and footage, and photographs not included in the one-hour program. (Annex 1932, foundation, structure, shale, WPA workers, restore, rotunda, deteriorate, stenciled, George Mickelson, Governor, copper dome, spittoons)
South Dakota State Capitol (Chapter 6) Restoring the Capitol: Describes problems that surfaced in the Capitol over several decades and the numerous projects that restored the building to its original beauty as well as new additions to the Capitol grounds, including memorials. For more resources, photo galleries, guides, etc.

Our Statehouse: A Capitol Idea - Produced in conjunction with the centenary of the South Dakota State Capitol, Our Statehouse: A Capitol Idea is an hour long documentary, a learning tool, an entertaining program, and an important record of South Dakota’s history. Our state Capitol is rich in architectural beauty, history, and political intrigue. Our Statehouse: A Capitol Idea tells the story of the Capitol in a visually stimulating and educational format. The program provides educators and citizens with a new tool for understanding the history of our state. It presents the stories of the key players behind the creation of the Capitol, the controversy in deciding a location, the reason Pierre was finally chosen as the Capital City, and details about construction. The program includes new footage and interviews, archival video, historic photographs and documents, and aerial footage. This teaching guide plus online elements support classroom use of the program. The companion Web site includes interactive online elements, downloadable educational resources, additional interviews and footage, and photographs not included in the one-hour program. (Paint, stain glass, rotunda, marble, dome, cracks, architecture, architectural, Supreme Court, Governor, Paul War Cloud, Native American Progress, cliché as, Blashfield, restoring, restore, artifact, Capitol Lake, Hilger Gulch, Governor’s Grove, arbor day, Janklow, restoration, Capitol Complex Restoration and Beautification Commission, stenciled, American Renaissance, replicas, chandeliers, scagliola, columns, pillars, mosaic floors, blue tile, renovation, restoration, George Mickelson, Korczak Ziolkowski, Ruth Ziolkowski, Fighting Stallions, memorial, WW I, WW II, Korean, Vietnam)
South Dakota State Capitol (Chapter 7) Our Capitol Today: Takes a last look at the Capitol through the eyes of several commentators and at some pending energy efficiency upgrades. For more resources, photo galleries, guides, etc.

Our Statehouse: A Capitol Idea - Produced in conjunction with the centenary of the South Dakota State Capitol, Our Statehouse: A Capitol Idea is an hour long documentary, a learning tool, an entertaining program, and an important record of South Dakota’s history. Our state Capitol is rich in architectural beauty, history, and political intrigue. Our Statehouse: A Capitol Idea tells the story of the Capitol in a visually stimulating and educational format. The program provides educators and citizens with a new tool for understanding the history of our state. It presents the stories of the key players behind the creation of the Capitol, the controversy in deciding a location, the reason Pierre was finally chosen as the Capital City, and details about construction. The program includes new footage and interviews, archival video, historic photographs and documents, and aerial footage. This teaching guide plus online elements support classroom use of the program. The companion Web site includes interactive online elements, downloadable educational resources, additional interviews and footage, and photographs not included in the one-hour program. (Restored Capitol, restoration, 100 years, century)
South Dakota State Capitol Building (Entire Program) SDPB produced television special about the South Dakota Capitol in Pierre, SD.

For more resources, photo galleries, guides, etc.

Our Statehouse: A Capitol Idea - Produced in conjunction with the centenary of the South Dakota State Capitol, Our Statehouse: A Capitol Idea is an hour long documentary, a learning tool, an entertaining program, and an important record of South Dakota’s history. Our state Capitol is rich in architectural beauty, history, and political intrigue. Our Statehouse: A Capitol Idea tells the story of the Capitol in a visually stimulating and educational format. The program provides educators and citizens with a new tool for understanding the history of our state. It presents the stories of the key players behind the creation of the Capitol, the controversy in deciding a location, the reason Pierre was finally chosen as the Capital City, and details about construction. The program includes new footage and interviews, archival video, historic photographs and documents, and aerial footage. This teaching guide plus online elements support classroom use of the program. The companion Web site includes interactive online elements, downloadable educational resources, additional interviews and footage, and photographs not included in the one-hour program.

(Architecture, state government, history, restore, 1910 Dakota Territory, Yankton, President Buchanan’s, President Lincoln, William Jayne. H, Governor Ordway, Bismarck North Dakota, Capitol on Wheels, Enabling Act of 1889, statehood proclamation, constitutional convention, Pierre, election, legislature, Congregational Church, Old Hughes County Courthouse, R.F. Pettigrew, G. C. Moody, senators, 1890, House of Representatives, Senate, Governor Mellette, Huron, campaign, 1903, 1905, legislature, Mitchell, senate joint resolution, votes, Governor Charels Nelson Herreid, statehouse, fireproof, archives, congressional donations, Governor Samuel H. Elrod, architect, Montana State Capitol, C.E. Bell, M.S. Detweiler, state stone, materials, native stone, field boulders, rotunda, contractor, O.H. Olsen, sandstone, limestone, Vermont marble, fieldstone from Highmore SD, rotunda, foundation, June 25th, 1908, corner stone, Governor Coe I. Crawford, Fanebust and Sons, May 1910, June 1910, capitol lake, natural gas, dome, materials, statehood, contractor, architectural history, neoclassic, murals, artists, Edward Simmons, Great Seal, art stained glass, pendentives, agriculture, goddess, Cerces, livestock, Europa, Zeus, wisdom, industry, mining, Minerva, motherhood, lunette, Edwin Blashfield, Sprit of the West, controversy, manifest destiny, annex 1932, structure, shale, WPA workers, restore, rotunda, deteriorate, stenciled, George Mickelson, Governor, copper dome, spittoons, Paint, stain glass, rotunda, marble, dome, cracks, architecture, architectural, Supreme Court, Governor, Paul War Cloud, Native American Progress, cliché as, Blashfield, restoring, restore, artifact, Hilger Gulch, Governor’s Grove, arbor day, Janklow, restoration, Capitol Complex Restoration and Beautification Commission, stenciled, American Renaissance, replicas, chandeliers, scagliola, columns, pillars, mosaic floors, blue tile, renovation, restoration, George Mickelson, Korczak Ziolkowski, Ruth Ziolkowski, Fighting Stallions, memorial, Korean, Vietnam, 100 years, century) (People mentioned in program: Bell, C. E.: Architect of the Capitol, Blashfield, Edwin: (1848-1936) American artist and
Muralist, Boe, Nils: (1913-1992) 23rd S.D. governor, 1965-69 (R), Buchanan, James: (1791-1868) 15th U.S. President, 1857-61 (D), Bulfinch, Charles: (1763-1844) early American architect, built rotunda and dome of U.S. Capitol, Crawford, Coe I.: (1858-1944) 6th S.D. governor, 1907-1909 (R), Detweiler, M. S.: Architect of the Capitol, Elrod, Samuel H.: (1856-1935) 5th S.D. governor, 1905-1907 (R), Fanebust, I.: Landscaper of the Capitol grounds, Grams, Bill: (1912-1983) state legislator from Sturgis, 1967-80 (R), Herreid, Charles Nelson: (1857-1928) 4th S.D. governor, 1901-1905 (R), Holloway, Charles: (1859-1941) American artist, Janklow, William: (1939- ) 27th and 30th S.D. governor, 1979-1987, 1995-2003 (R), Jayne, William: (1826-1916) 1st Dakota Territory governor, 1861-63; territorial delegate to U.S. House, 1863-64 (R), Kneip, Richard: (1933-1987) 25th S.D. governor, 1971-78 (D), Lamont, Frances “Peg”: (1914- ) state legislator from Aberdeen, 1975-88 (R), Lincoln, Abraham: (1809-1865) 16th U.S. President, 1861-65 (R), Mellette, Arthur: (1842-1896) last Dakota Territory governor, 1885-89; 1st S.D. governor, 1889-1893 (R), Mickelson, George S.: (1941-1993) 28th S.D. governor, 1987-93 (R), son of Gov. George T. Mickelson, Mickelson, George T.: (1903-1965) 18th S.D. governor, 1947-51 (R), father of Gov. George S. Mickelson
Moody, C.F.: (1832-1904) member of Dakota Territory, House of Representatives, served on territorial Supreme Court, S.D. U.S. Senator, 1889-91 (R), Olsen, O.H.: Contractor for S.D. State Capitol, Ordway, Nehemiah: (1828-1907) 7th Dakota Territory governor, 1880-84, Pettigrew, R.F.: (1848-1926) Dakota Territory representative in U.S. Congress, 1881-83, 1885-89; S.D. U.S. Senator, 1889-1901 (R), Simmons, Edward: (1852-1931) American painter and muralist, War Cloud, Paul: (1930-1973) Native American author, artist, and publisher, Ziolkowski, Korczak: (1908-1982) designer and sculptor of Crazy Horse Memorial, Ziolkowski, Ruth: (1926- ) wife of Korczak Ziolkowski and director of Crazy Horse Memorial)

Spirit of the Dance: Wacipi South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2: OSEUS2)

Spirit of the Dance: Wacipi focuses on the dance styles and history of the Northern Plains Indians. Lakota elders, scholars and others share stories of the many dances that are still performed at pow wows (Wacipi) today.

The program features footage of pow wows all over the state, and explores how dance has evolved over the years, as well as the important role of the drum.
STAAS1 STAAS1
STAAS2 STAAS2
STAS1 STAS1
STAS2 STAS2
T. Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing - Cylinder Landscapes Extra Cylinder Landscapes Extra

Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing is a multi-part video series featuring South Dakota artist Dick Termes teaching basic drawing techniques. Resources available for the project are described in the following Teaching and User’s Guide and are available at PBS Learning Media. The series includes more than five hours of content in 20 individual videos (Preview), activities, a teacher’s guide and lesson plans that could be integrated into classrooms of all kinds or for use at home.
Tawapaha Olowan Wan (A Flag Song - S.D.) South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6)

Interpretation of Songs (Document)

Tawapaha Olowan Wan (A Flag Song - S.D.)

Each society had a song that used to honor war deeds, values and good deeds. This song was on hand and ended up becoming the SD Flag song, but historically each tiospaye had their own song.

This song is said to have come from many different areas. Many tribes use this Flag song during celebrations or social gatherings. Researched and translated by Earl Bullhead (Nica Ole).(E. Bullhead 2012)

Winter Count Lessons
Temples of Justice: Courthouses County Courthouse Presentation (Lower Left)

The South Dakota State Historical Preservation Office has developed a South Dakota Courthouse presentation (PowerPoint and script) that could be used by historical groups, schools and families that want to learn more about the history of the counties and courthouses in South Dakota.
Ten Little Fingers and Ten Little Toes Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

Ten Little Fingers and Ten Little Toes (SD Library Search) by Mem Fox and Helen Oxenbury Harcourt - It is time for another Buddy’s Book Club! I just love babies, their little toes and fingers… they are so cute! If you like babies too… then you must read Ten Little Fingers and Ten Little Toes. 

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
The Badlands: Nature's Time Capsule Go here for more information and resources

The Badlands of South Dakota are a masterpiece created by the elements: sculpted from the earth by water and wind.

The Badlands: Nature's Time Capsule examines: Geological "artforms" 75 million years in the making. The inhabitants who have called the area home. Modern-day preservation efforts.

The Black Hills and The Mountain Pine Beetle The Black Hills and The Mountain Pine Beetle. What an ongoing and severe Mountain Pine Beetle infestation is doing to Black Hills forests - and what is being done to limit the impact of the blight. (High Resolution Video)

Links to organizations and advocacy groups referred to in the program:
- A U.S. Forest Service Web page with pine beetle information specific to the Black Hills.
- USDA Forest Service: Black Hills
- South Dakota Department of Agriculture: Pine beetles
- Black Hills Forest Resource Association
- The Norbeck Society

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
The Complete Circle of Reservations The Complete Circle of Reservations - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshop in 2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1, OSEU1)
(OSEUS OSEU)
The Dust Bowl South Dakota: Lessons A look at how the Dust Bowl of the 1930's affected South Dakota. (High Resolution Video)

Related Programs:
- The Dust Bowl South Dakota: Memories
- Regional Youth Town Hall Meeting: Dust Bowl SD

Resources:
- Natural Resources Conservation Service - South Dakota
- South Dakota Association of Conservation Districts at sdconservation.org
- Unlock the Secrets in the Soil" USDA Soil Health Information
- South Dakota Agricultural Heritage Museum
- Learn more about South Dakota during the 1930s in this South Dakota State Historical Society slideshow on Flickr.
- View South Dakota Dust Bowl images on Flickr. (Courtesy: NRCS)

Related Content:
- Dust Bowl: A Film By Ken Burns (Video clips, photos and more/ Education Resources)
- American Experience: Surviving the Dust Bowl (Teacher)
- PBS LearningMedia

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
The Dust Bowl South Dakota: Memories A look at how the Dust Bowl of the 1930's affected South Dakota. (High Resolution Video)

Related Programs:
- The Dust Bowl South Dakota: Lessons
- Regional Youth Town Hall Meeting: Dust Bowl SD

Resources:
- Natural Resources Conservation Service - South Dakota
- South Dakota Association of Conservation Districts at sdconservation.org
- Unlock the Secrets in the Soil" USDA Soil Health Information
- South Dakota Agricultural Heritage Museum
- Learn more about South Dakota during the 1930s in this South Dakota State Historical Society slideshow on Flickr.
- View South Dakota Dust Bowl images on Flickr. (Courtesy: NRCS)

Related Content:
- Dust Bowl: A Film By Ken Burns (Video clips, photos and more/ Education Resources)
- American Experience: Surviving the Dust Bowl (Teacher)
- PBS LearningMedia

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.



The Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 10a - The Birthday Boy (Tȟúŋpi Aŋpétu Kiŋ) Activity Ideas Below Description

NOTE: Video player on this page only works using Internet Explorer browser. Use site below to view in different browsers.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Online

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


The Berenstain Bears Site (Click "Kids" for Activities) Flash – Use Internet Explorer.

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
With Mama and Papa too busy setting up Brother’s birthday party, Sister reluctantly decides to do her 'Tell Us About A Family Member' school assignment on Brother. However videotaping him for her project not only allows her to see a side of him she never saw before, it helps her realize just how much her big brother really means to her. Ultimately not only is Sister’s Birthday Boy video an A+ project, it also doubles as Brother’s best birthday gift ever. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ owáyawa uŋ tȟáŋtaŋhaŋ itówapinaškaŋškaŋyaŋpi waŋží káǧiŋ kte héčha. Ho éyaš húŋku é na atkúku tȟúŋpi aŋpétu wičhákičhopi tȟáwa kiŋ yuhá škáŋpi čha thiblóku éha kpasí na itówapinaškaŋškaŋyaŋpi waŋ káǧiŋ kta gluštáŋ. Héčhuŋ ečhúŋhaŋ tȟogyé awíyukčaŋ na líla waŋkátuya glawá čha aíč’ibleze. Owáyawa-ta wóohiye káǧiŋ na nakúŋ thiblóku tȟúŋpi aŋpétu wawíčhak’upi waŋ iyótaŋ wašté čha kíčaǧe.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Question: Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Answer: Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs (NOTE: Flash player – Use Internet Explorer.)

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version?

Visit your local library for the Berenstain Bears books.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Mondays, 2:00pm CT and Saturdays, 6:30am CT

The Lakota Berenstain Bears

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher.

(Search Terms - Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")
The Lakota Berenstain Bears: Episode 10b - The Green Eyed Monster (Wónawizi) Activity Ideas Below Description

NOTE: Video player on this page only works using Internet Explorer browser. Use site below to view in different browsers.

The Lakota Berenstain Bears Online

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


The Berenstain Bears Site (Click "Kids" for Activities) Flash – Use Internet Explorer.

New Lakota Dictionary Online

Description:
When Brother gets a brand new three speed racer, Sister’s envious feelings are personified in her dreams by a little green version of herself. This Green Eyed Monster convinces Sister to sneak brother’s new bike out for a ride but when she does, Sister realizes too late that it’s too big for her and she can’t control it. Fortunately Brother and Papa rescue Sister before Brother’s bike can crash, and then together they help chase the Green Eyed Monster away by jazzing up Brother’s old bike and giving it to Sister. (Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")

Lakota
Matȟó Hokšíla hunáhomnipi waŋ lečhála čha k’úpi yuŋkȟáŋ tȟaŋkšítku kiŋ inákiwizi. Wóihaŋble él wóanawizi kiŋ hé tȟaŋíŋič’iya yuŋkȟáŋ kȟáŋšnišniyela iyé iyéčheča éyaš isáŋm čísčila naháŋ tȟaŋátaya tȟózi. Líla iyútaŋyiŋ na gnáyaŋ čha thiblóku tȟa-húnahomnipi kiŋ ékhi na akáŋyaŋke-wačhíŋ éyaš khičháŋyaŋ okíhi šni. Wáphiya, thiblóku kiŋ é na atkúku kiŋ khiyéla úŋpi čha iyé é na hunáhomnipi kiŋ nuphíŋ awáŋyaŋkapi okíhipi. Ptáyela ištá tȟózi k’uŋ hé ȟabyápi na thiblóku kiŋ tȟa-húnahomnipi tȟáŋníla kiŋ yutȟéčapi na tȟaŋkšítku yuhákhiyapi.

From the Lakota Language Consortium:

Question: Will there be an option for English subtitles on the DVD?

Answer: Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe Probably not, since that would defeat the purpose of language learning... Think about the last time you watched a subtitled foreign film. How much of the language were you actually learning? More likely you were tuning out the foreign ...language, reading the English and watching the film. The same would happen here if we put the English in. With the Lakota only version, it will be a little harder at first to get the meaning, but it will improve your compression more in the long run.

Activity Ideas:
Below are three examples of how the Lakota Berenstain Bears series could be used in the classroom. The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”)

Face Value:

It was in the early 1980s; two men stepped into a studio at Sinte Gleska College and shared a group of sacred songs. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs were performed by John Around Him and translated by Albert White Hat Senior. The recordings were made in order to help teach others who want to bring the spiritual practices back to all of the people. It is believed that this was the first ceremonial recording produced after a ban had been placed on Native American religious ceremonies. The recordings were a milestone in the attempt to eliminate a culture and language. The Lakota Ceremonial Songs (NOTE: Flash player – Use Internet Explorer.)

The Lakota Berenstain Bears series is a milestone in Lakota/Native American history. This is the first children’s program ever translated into the Lakota language. The series represents an acceptance of a language that was once forbidden. Showing an episode in a classroom reinforces and encourages children to accept different cultures and languages.

From Book to Video (activity for older children):

This would be a good language arts experience for 5th - 12th grade. The original Berenstain Bears TV series is based on the books but they do not follow the text word for word. It is very interesting to compare an original text to a television adaptation. There is room for individual interpretation of the author’s vision. Visual background, characters, sound effects and voice are used to convey a message. Comparing a section in the book to a section of video can be an eye opener. Scenes, reactions and characters can be omitted or changed to fit the timeframe and vision of the television production. Was the author’s vision conveyed?

It is also very interesting to see if the author’s emotions are conveyed in the TV production(s). It would be very interesting to compare a section of the book, the original TV production and the Lakota version to see if the emotions are consistent. A complete understanding of the Lakota language is not necessary for this activity. I would have the students close their eyes for this activity. First a section of the book should be read, paying special attention to punctuation. Then I would locate the corresponding section in both TV versions and have the kids listen to them with their eyes closed. Then watch the section with their eyes open. Visuals and changes in voice pattern (tone and speed) are very important to convey emotion. Did the TV versions convey the expected emotions? Did the emotions in the original TV version match the Lakota version?

Visit your local library for the Berenstain Bears books.
Berenstain Bears, SDPB TV, Mondays, 2:00pm CT and Saturdays, 6:30am CT

The Lakota Berenstain Bears

Original Berenstain Bears on YouTube


Learning Lakota

Each episode has an accompanying Lakota script and glossary, which can be found at the following site: The Lakota Berenstain Bears Script and Glossary (Click “View Episodes”, “Episode Name” and “Supporting Materials”) To start, select 1-2 Lakota words from the glossary. Select words that are repeated many times in the script. For example, select tȟaŋkší – younger sister (male term). Then, have the students listen for the term while viewing. Every time the term is said the students should hold up a red piece of construction paper. The teacher should follow along with the script also raising a red piece of paper. The students that have a harder time hearing the differences in the individual words will see the other students raising their cards. Over time distinctions in sounds will become apparent as more words are recognized and added to the working list of known words. This would be a slow process, but it would be a start. Starting with too many words would be very frustrating for the students and teacher.

(Search Terms - Native American, Indian, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Lakota Language Consortium, Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, dialects, language, The "Matȟó Waúŋšila Thiwáhe")
The Oceti Sakowin: According to Who? Lesson Plan – The Oceti Sakowin: According to Who? - This lesson can be accessed HERE or by clicking the PDF, lower left.

This lesson was not created by the SDPB, and therefore should be attributed to the person(s) who created them. Each lesson plan identifies the developer. All of the lesson plans were created by participants at the CAIRNS Approaches to Teaching Lakota Culture workshops from 2007-2014.

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5, OSEU5)
OSEUS, OSEU
The Stavig Letters (Timeline, Photos and More)

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

The Stavig Letters Collection - The Stavig Letters, written in Norwegian and translated into English by Bruce and Marta Boyce, are an extensive collection of letters between two brothers, Lars Stavig who immigrated to America and his brother Knut who stayed in Norway. Consisting of more than 150 letters spanning more than five decades from 1881 to 1938, the Stavig Letters give voice and reality to the immigrant experience from the perspectives of both countries.

Readers Theater Production - 'The Stavig Letters: The Story of a Norwegian Immigrant' is a dramatic performance of the letters selected, edited and Dramatized by Dr. Wayne S. Knutson, Professor Emeritus at the University of South Dakota. The cast of three includes a narrator and the two half-brothers, Lars Stavig, who comes to the prairie, and Knut Stavik, who remains in Norway. Using direct excerpts from the letters and basic theater props, the play lasts approximately 70 minutes and can be performed anywhere. 'The Stavig Letters' is a program of the South Dakota Humanities Speakers Bureau.

The Television Program - This one-hour program takes the Readers Theater Production in a new direction. It uses footage shot in Norway, Northeast South Dakota, and the coast of Maine. This footage, combined with historic photographs and actor's voices, breathes new life into the immigrant experience in America. While the program focuses on the families and descendents of Lars Stavig in America, and his half-brother Knut Stavik, In Norway, it is a universal immigrant's story.
The Tall Houses Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

The Tall Houses (SD Library Search) by Gianna Marino, Viking - My neighbors are very mad at each other. They are competing against each other to build the tallest house in the neighborhood. Read Too Tall Houses to see who builds the tallest house.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.
The Watermelon Seed Here is one of Buddy’s favorite books. Buddy likes to read a lot and always finds out about new and interesting things in the books he reads. (Visit Buddy’s website for games, activities and more!)

The Watermelon Seed (SD Library Search) by Greg Pizzoli Disney-Hyperion Books - This is not good… he is starting to get really sick! He is turning pink and his stomach is starting to grow! Read The Watermelon Seed to see if he is ok or if he turns into a salad.

Tip for viewing an imbedded player. Try the following to reduce pixilation when enlarging the video. Click “View” on the top of the browser, then click “Zoom”, then increase the size. I normally increase to a size between 250% and 300%, then scroll to the player. The player is larger and there is no pixilation. To reverse, click “View” and reduce to 100%.

Traditional use of Tatanka (buffalo) Traditional use of Tatanka (buffalo) Lesson Plan (Also lower Left - PDFs)

Traditional use of Tatanka (buffalo) is a PowerPoint series developed by Badlands National Park and South Dakota Public Broadcasting.
1. Students will identify buffalo parts and their location on a buffalo.
2. Students will learn the traditional use of the buffalo parts.


IOTP, buffalo, Native American, Indian, traditional use, American Bison, bison, Tatanka, Great Plains, European exploration, settlement, hunting, fur trade, manifest destiny

Traditional use of Tatanka (buffalo) PowerPoint Series ***NOTE***
There are four interactive PowerPoint presentations at the link below. The presentations download very slowly if you choose “Open”. Please select "Save", and save them to your desktop for a quick download. (PowerPoint Presentations)

Traditional use of Tatanka (buffalo) is a 4 part PowerPoint series developed by Badlands National Park and South Dakota Public Broadcasting.

The PowerPoint series includes a brief history of buffalo in South Dakota. Also, there are photos of buffalo parts, like a buffalo hide and tail. Your students are encouraged to guess the traditional use of the buffalo part and its location on the buffalo. Please select one of the PowerPoint presentations below. (PowerPoint version 2002-SP3 or newer is suggested)

South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1 - Land Stewardship)
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6 - Cause/Effect: Cultural Identity)

Tribes of Dakota: Cheyenne River Reservation - Elders (Audio) South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2: OSEUS2)
(Essential Understanding 5: OSEUS5)

SDPB Radio - Tribes of Dakota: Cheyenne River Reservation - Elders (Resources/Entire Series)

Tribes of Dakota is an ongoing project of South Dakota Public Broadcasting to research, explore, uncover, and share the unique history and culture of South Dakota's Native Americans. Perspectives of indigenous people from across the state will be told from the Lakota Elders on the Cheyenne River Reservation, to the Urban Indians in Rapid City and Sioux Falls where they struggle to maintain cultural identity in mainstream society.
Tribes of Dakota: Flandreau Reservation: Casinos (Audio) South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7)

SDPB Radio - Tribes of Dakota: Flandreau Reservation: Casinos (Resources/Entire Series)

Tribes of Dakota is an ongoing project of South Dakota Public Broadcasting to research, explore, uncover, and share the unique history and culture of South Dakota's Native Americans. Perspectives of indigenous people from across the state will be told from the Lakota Elders on the Cheyenne River Reservation, to the Urban Indians in Rapid City and Sioux Falls where they struggle to maintain cultural identity in mainstream society.
Tribes of Dakota: Pine Ridge Reservation - Spiritual (Audio) South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 2: OSEUS2)
(Essential Understanding 3: OSEUS3)

SDPB Radio - Tribes of Dakota: Pine Ridge Reservation - Spiritual (Resources/Entire Series)

Tribes of Dakota is an ongoing project of South Dakota Public Broadcasting to research, explore, uncover, and share the unique history and culture of South Dakota's Native Americans. Perspectives of indigenous people from across the state will be told from the Lakota Elders on the Cheyenne River Reservation, to the Urban Indians in Rapid City and Sioux Falls where they struggle to maintain cultural identity in mainstream society.
Tribes of Dakota: Rosebud Reservation - Domestic Violence (Audio) South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7)

SDPB Radio - Tribes of Dakota: Rosebud Reservation - Domestic Violence (Resources/Entire Series)

Tribes of Dakota is an ongoing project of South Dakota Public Broadcasting to research, explore, uncover, and share the unique history and culture of South Dakota's Native Americans. Perspectives of indigenous people from across the state will be told from the Lakota Elders on the Cheyenne River Reservation, to the Urban Indians in Rapid City and Sioux Falls where they struggle to maintain cultural identity in mainstream society. (sweat lodge)
Tribes of Dakota: Urban Indians (Audio) South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 7: OSEUS7)

SDPB Radio - Tribes of Dakota: Urban Indians (Resources/Entire Series)

Tribes of Dakota is an ongoing project of South Dakota Public Broadcasting to research, explore, uncover, and share the unique history and culture of South Dakota's Native Americans. Perspectives of indigenous people from across the state will be told from the Lakota Elders on the Cheyenne River Reservation, to the Urban Indians in Rapid City and Sioux Falls where they struggle to maintain cultural identity in mainstream society.
Tribes of Dakota: Yankton Sioux - Treaties (Audio) South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 1: OSEUS1)
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6)

SDPB Radio - Tribes of Dakota: Yankton Sioux - Treaties (Resources/Entire Series)

Tribes of Dakota is an ongoing project of South Dakota Public Broadcasting to research, explore, uncover, and share the unique history and culture of South Dakota's Native Americans. Perspectives of indigenous people from across the state will be told from the Lakota Elders on the Cheyenne River Reservation, to the Urban Indians in Rapid City and Sioux Falls where they struggle to maintain cultural identity in mainstream society.
Types of Winter Counts (audio only) South Dakota DOE - Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards
(Essential Understanding 6: OSEUS6)

Audio Only - Victor Douville, Sinte Gleska University, explains the different types of winter count.

Winter Count Lessons

Related lesson plans and PowerPoint presentations, lower left
U. Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing - Sphere Landscapes Extra Sphere Landscapes Extra

Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing is a multi-part video series featuring South Dakota artist Dick Termes teaching basic drawing techniques. Resources available for the project are described in the following Teaching and User’s Guide and are available at PBS Learning Media. The series includes more than five hours of content in 20 individual videos (Preview), activities, a teacher’s guide and lesson plans that could be integrated into classrooms of all kinds or for use at home.
Upload testing This is a test. Please disregard.
USD Head Start Science Workshop Resources for science workshop with USD Head Start.
V. Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing - Different Forms: Spirals, Ribbons and Walls Video - Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing - Different Forms (Spirals, Ribbons and Walls) - In this video Dick creates “fun” (in his words) shapes by starting with shapes that resemble the main forms the series has dealt with but does them more organically. Then he adds dimensions to create forms like spirals, stars, ribbons, and walls.

Art Basics with Dick Termes: Drawing is a multi-part video series featuring South Dakota artist Dick Termes teaching basic drawing techniques. Resources available for the project are described in the following Teaching and User’s Guide and are available at PBS Learning Media. The series includes more than five hours of content in 20 individual videos (